Afraid of needles? Doctors Have Tools to Help Patients Cope

Doctors say fear of needles prevents many people from shooting. A pediatric psychologist at Children’s Mercy Hospital in Kansas City said there are tools used to help patients receive the COVID-19 vaccine and other vaccines. For children who are afraid of needles, the hospital has a plan called the “Comfortable Promise”. The first step is to provide something that paralyzes the skin before the injection, such as a topical cream or a cold spray. The hospital has it and a tool called a shot blocker for vaccination. “If you put it on your arm and this injection is given to this opening here, basically put it between the pain and the brain, and put these spikes on your back, blocking the signals going to the brain. Nervously distracted and relieves pain response, ”Deacy said. Vibrant bees have a similar effect. Comfortable posture and distractions are also helpful. For younger patients, doctors recommend a small amount of sugar water. “The baby has the ability to convert sucrose or its sugar into endogenous opioids, which basically means it’s their own visceral pain reliever,” Decacy said. Severe phobias may require gradual treatment. Pediatric psychologists have said that this fear can cause people to avoid medical circles altogether. Regular immunity. “It’s not just the kids. One in four adults is afraid of needles. The hospital provides employees with shot blockers and pain-relieving sprays for the flu shot and COVID-19 vaccine.

Doctors say fear of needles prevents many people from shooting.

A pediatric psychologist at Children’s Mercy Hospital in Kansas City said there are tools used to help patients receive the COVID-19 vaccine and other vaccines.

For children who are afraid of needles, the hospital has a plan called the “Promise of Comfort”. The first step is to provide something that paralyzes the skin before the injection, such as a topical cream or a cold spray.

“It cools this top layer of skin and provides some distraction,” said pediatric psychologist Dr Amanda DC.

The hospital also has a tool called a shot blocker for vaccination.

“By laying on the arm and delivering that shot through that opening, it essentially places it between the pain and the brain, blocking the signal to the brain where these spikes on the back occur and providing nerve distraction. And reduce the pain in response. “

Vibrant bees have a similar effect. Comfortable posture and distractions are also helpful. For younger patients, doctors recommend a small amount of sugar water.

“The baby has the ability to convert sucrose or its sugar into endogenous opioids, which basically means it’s their own internal pain reliever,” Decacy said. ..

Severe phobias may require treatment which is gradually exposed to the needle procedure.

Pediatric psychologists have said this fear can cause people to bypass the medical setting altogether.

“That’s exactly what we want to prevent, and it’s like the spread of this phobia of missing health opportunities in the form of regular immunity,” Decacy said.

It’s not just the kids. One in four adults is afraid of needles. The hospital provides employees with shot blockers and pain-relieving sprays for the flu shot and COVID-19 vaccine.

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