Online psychology – Populer Psikoloji http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 22:17:41 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-01T204530.168-150x150.png Online psychology – Populer Psikoloji http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/ 32 32 FACT FOCUS: Unfounded theory used to reject COVID measures http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/fact-focus-unfounded-theory-used-to-reject-covid-measures/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 18:26:34 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/fact-focus-unfounded-theory-used-to-reject-covid-measures/ FILE – Dr. Robert Malone gestures as he stands in his barn Wednesday, July 22, 2020, in Madison, Virginia. An unfounded theory taking root online suggests that millions of people have been “hypnotized” to believe mainstream ideas about COVID-19. In posts shared widely on social media this week, efforts to fight the disease were dismissed […]]]>

title=hypnotized"

FILE – Dr. Robert Malone gestures as he stands in his barn Wednesday, July 22, 2020, in Madison, Virginia. An unfounded theory taking root online suggests that millions of people have been “hypnotized” to believe mainstream ideas about COVID-19. In posts shared widely on social media this week, efforts to fight the disease were dismissed with just three words: “mass-forming psychosis.” The term gained attention after it was launched by Malone in a Dec.31, 2021 podcast appearance. (AP Photo / Steve Helber)

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An unfounded theory taking root online suggests that millions of people have been “hypnotized” to believe mainstream ideas about COVID-19, including measures to combat it such as testing and vaccination.

In posts shared widely on social media this week, efforts to fight the disease were dismissed with just three words: “mass-forming psychosis.”

“I’m no scientist, but I’m pretty sure healthy people who spend hours in line to get tested for the virus are mass-forming psychosis in action,” it reads. a tweet that has been liked over 22,000 times.

The term gained attention after it was launched by Dr. Robert Malone in the podcast “The Joe Rogan Experience” on December 31. Malone is a scientist who once researched mRNA technology, but is now a skeptic of COVID-19 vaccines that use it.

But psychology experts say the concept Malone describes is unsupported by evidence and is similar to theories that have long been discredited. Here’s a look at the facts.

ALLEGATION: The concept of “mass training psychosis” explains why millions of people believe in a mainstream “story” about COVID-19 and trust the safety and effectiveness of vaccines.

THE FACTS: Malone pointed out the unfounded theory on a podcast hosted by comedian and commentator Joe Rogan. During the episode, Malone questioned the safety of the COVID-19 vaccine and claimed that mass psychosis caused “third of the population” to hypnotize him into believing what Dr Anthony Fauci, the nation’s top infectious disease expert, and the mainstream media say.

Malone went on to say that the phenomenon explained Nazi Germany.

“When you have a society that has become decoupled from each other and has a floating anxiety that things don’t make sense, we can’t figure it out, then their attention is focused by a leader or a leader. series of events on a small point, just like hypnosis, they literally become hypnotized and can be conducted anywhere, ”said Malone. He asserted that such people will not allow the “narrative” to be called into question.

Crediting a professor in Belgium, Malone also said in a December blog post that this “mass hypnosis” explains why millions of people are captivated by the “dominant narrative regarding the safety and efficacy of genetic vaccines”.

Psychological experts say there is no support for the theory of “psychosis” described by Malone.

“To my knowledge, there is no proof of this concept,” said Jay Van Bavel, assistant professor of psychology and neural sciences at New York University who recently co-authored a book on the identities of group. Van Bavel said he had never come across the term “mass-forming psychosis” in his years of research, and could not find it in any peer-reviewed literature.

“The concept has no academic credibility,” wrote Stephen Reicher, professor of social psychology at the University of St Andrews in the UK, in an email to The Associated Press.

The term also does not appear in the American Psychological Association’s dictionary of psychology.

“Psychosis” is a term that refers to conditions that involve a certain disconnection from reality. According to an estimate from the National Institutes of Health, about 3% of people experience some form of psychosis at some point in their life.

Richard McNally, professor of clinical psychology at Harvard University, wrote in an email that the people who support COVID-19 vaccines and public health advice are not illusory. On the contrary, they are “fully sensitive to the arguments and evidence presented by the scientific experts concerned”.

Health officials have found COVID-19 vaccines to be safe and effective, especially in terms of protection against serious illness.

Malone’s description of “mass training psychosis” sounds like discredited concepts, such as “crowd mentality” and “group spirit,” according to John Drury, a social psychologist at the University of Sussex in the UK. which studies collective behavior. The ideas suggest that “when people are part of a psychological crowd, they lose their identity and self-control; they become suggestible and primitive instinctual impulses predominate, ”he said in an email.

This notion has been discredited by decades of research into crowd behavior, Drury said. “No respectable psychologist agrees with these ideas now,” he said.

Many experts told the AP that while there is some evidence that groups can shape or influence behavior – and that people can believe and believe the lies advanced by the leader of a group – these concepts do not not involve the masses suffering from “psychosis” or “hypnosis.”

Steven Jay Lynn, professor of psychology at Binghamton University in New York, said that Malone’s argument that a group can “literally become hypnotized and be led anywhere” rests on a myth about l ‘hypnosis.

“His claim represents a serious misunderstanding of hypnosis and doubles the popular misconception that hypnosis somehow turns people into stupid robots who think what the hypnotist wants them to think and carry out orders. ‘hypnotist,’ Lynn said in an email. “The scientifically established fact is that people can easily resist and even object to suggestions.”

Before the concept of “mass training psychosis” took off in recent days, it had been spreading online in recent months.

Mattias Desmet, the professor in Belgium that Malone cited for framing the idea, did not respond to requests for comment. Malone also did not return a request for comment.

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Fichera reported from Philadelphia; Kelety from Phoenix.

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This is part of AP’s efforts to tackle widely shared disinformation, including working with outside companies and organizations to add factual context to the deceptive content circulating online. Learn more about fact checking at AP.

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Parents fear the psychological and mental costs of online learning http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/parents-fear-the-psychological-and-mental-costs-of-online-learning/ Fri, 07 Jan 2022 00:26:17 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/parents-fear-the-psychological-and-mental-costs-of-online-learning/ Breadcrumb Links Toronto and RGT Post-pandemic Ontario News Study shows that “students who thought they mattered the least were those who learned full-time online” Author of the article: Scott Laurie Lisa Baetz and her two sons, Jacob and William, attend a small protest against distance learning at Lime Ridge Shopping Center in Hamilton. Photo by […]]]>

Study shows that “students who thought they mattered the least were those who learned full-time online”

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Some of the parents who have decided to boycott e-learning are concerned about the long-term impacts on their children.

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“I’m not logging in – and it’s already relieved a layer of stress for our family,” said Lisa Baetz, who joined six Hamilton families on Wednesday in a protest with their children against online learning.

“The prejudice for children of being out of school compared to those who are there is so much greater. So we have to get them back. But I don’t think for a second that we’ll be back.

Shannon Duran is also taking her two children – in grades 3 and 6 – away from online learning this time around.

“What I saw my kids do online was nothing like home schooling through the board like my mom did with us,” said Duran. “It was just tragic and that’s how I felt; it was as if their minds were dying.

Duran is quick to point out that his children have had amazing teachers during the various waves of disruption.

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But she wonders about the prolonged lack of in-person socialization.

A study last fall in the Psychoeducational Assessment Journal found that “the students who thought they mattered the least were the ones who learned full-time online during the pandemic (elementary and secondary students)”.

Their study involved 6,578 Canadian students in grades 4 to 12.

We apologize, but this video failed to load.

Researchers at the University of Ottawa examined student perceptions of the importance during the pandemic of in-person learning versus online learning.

“We found that elementary students who attended school in person reported being the most important, followed by high school students who learned part-time in person and the rest of the time online,” the authors wrote.

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Ontario’s latest education plan calls for students to learn remotely until at least Jan. 17.

The plan beyond is still unknown.

“It is important to know how online and digital education affects elementary and secondary school students, as online learning is likely to be retained to some extent after the pandemic,” concluded the authors of the school study.

Many parents say they are done with it online.

“The impact on the mental health of children and families – it’s taking its toll and we have to come back for these kids. These children need it; they deserve it, ”Baetz said.

“I can’t believe we’re in our 23 e month and fourth closure of schools.

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Children with chronic illness or special education needs need more support for online learning http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/children-with-chronic-illness-or-special-education-needs-need-more-support-for-online-learning/ Wed, 05 Jan 2022 01:05:00 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/children-with-chronic-illness-or-special-education-needs-need-more-support-for-online-learning/ Online learning poses additional challenges for children with chronic conditions or special educational needs, and these patients may benefit from greater support from pediatric clinicians to achieve academic success, according to a new article by opinion published in JAMA Pediatrics published today and co-authored by researchers at the Kennedy Krieger Institute and Johns Hopkins Medicine. […]]]>

Online learning poses additional challenges for children with chronic conditions or special educational needs, and these patients may benefit from greater support from pediatric clinicians to achieve academic success, according to a new article by opinion published in JAMA Pediatrics published today and co-authored by researchers at the Kennedy Krieger Institute and Johns Hopkins Medicine.

Clinicians must address school-related challenges or issues just like any other medical need in pediatric care, said Lisa Jacobson, PhD, NCSP, ABPP, Co-Director of Kennedy Krieger’s Center for Innovation and Leadership in Special Education (CILSE ) and Director of Research for the Institute’s Department of Neuropsychology.

This includes collecting a child’s complete medical history and details of their academic performance, as well as noting any signs of any academic difficulties the patient is facing. Clinicians can reach out to neuropsychology teams, educators, or social workers to help their chronically ill patients keep pace with their peers academically.

These recommendations are based on research conducted with pediatric oncology patients, who experienced unique barriers with e-learning during the COVID-19 pandemic; in fact, more than half, or 57 percent, of parents of children with cancer reported difficulty learning online during this time.

Before the pandemic, parents of children with cancer also reported difficulty obtaining special education services due to several factors, including a lack of familiarity with the resources available as well as how to obtain them. But these challenges are not unique to pediatric cancer patients; children with other chronic illnesses, including the longest COVID, or with special educational needs face the same obstacles, said Dr Jacobson.

However, these same families often have regular interactions with pediatricians throughout their child’s treatment or care. By raising awareness of the positive role pediatricians can play in educating their patients, these clinicians could provide assistance with school-related issues, she said, adding that not doing so could help. negative impacts on health throughout life.

Source:

Kennedy Krieger Institute

Journal reference:

Thornton, PC, et al. (2022) Education for children with chronic illness. Move forward in online and virtual learning. JAMA Pediatrics. doi.org/10.1001/jamapediatrics.2021.5643.

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Are New Years Resolutions Powerful or Useless? http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/are-new-years-resolutions-powerful-or-useless/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 22:51:05 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/are-new-years-resolutions-powerful-or-useless/ “Yesterday, everyone smoked their last cigar, drank their last glass and took their last oath,” he wrote on January 1, 1863. “Today, we are a pious and exemplary community. In thirty days we will have tossed our reform to the winds and we will have reduced our old loopholes considerably faster than ever. We’ll also […]]]>

“Yesterday, everyone smoked their last cigar, drank their last glass and took their last oath,” he wrote on January 1, 1863. “Today, we are a pious and exemplary community. In thirty days we will have tossed our reform to the winds and we will have reduced our old loopholes considerably faster than ever. We’ll also happily reflect on how we did the same thing last year around this time.

In Schaffner’s opinion, it’s no coincidence that many of us are especially eager to make positive changes after a hedonistic vacation period. “You have let yourself go too much and now is the time to cleanse yourself,” she said. It’s worth noting, she says, that many resolutions focus on abstinence – giving up our bad habits to cleanse our body and soul.

The “principle of purity” cannot fully explain our penchant for New Year’s resolutions. Many of us, after all, can make promises after relatively sober festivities. And many of our goals relate to work or personal activities that have nothing to do with spiritual and physical atonement. So, is there something special about the date itself that makes personal change of any kind appealing?

Some clues come from the way the brain organizes its memories. Psychologists have found that, rather than seeing our lives as a continuum, we tend to create a narrative, divided into separate “chapters” that mark the different stages of our lives. “People tend to think of life as if they are characters in a book,” says Katy Milkman, professor of psychology at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania and author of the book How to Change.

These chapters can characterize major life events, such as entering college, getting married, or having your first child. But your mind can also break these large chapters into smaller sections so that the start of a new year can represent a break in the story. “Whenever you have a moment that feels like a division of time, your mind does a special thing where it creates the feeling that you have a fresh start,” says Milkman. “You turn the page, you have a clean slate, it’s a new beginning.”

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How many more will die before we stop politicizing masks? http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/how-many-more-will-die-before-we-stop-politicizing-masks/ Fri, 31 Dec 2021 21:31:17 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/how-many-more-will-die-before-we-stop-politicizing-masks/ Despite record-breaking COVID-19 cases in North America, recommendations on how to celebrate the New Year vary. In Canada, Quebec has a curfew and Ontario has asked people to keep rapid tests to use when symptoms appear, rather than using them for socializing. Indeed, perhaps the most consistent thing about the pandemic as a whole has […]]]>

Despite record-breaking COVID-19 cases in North America, recommendations on how to celebrate the New Year vary. In Canada, Quebec has a curfew and Ontario has asked people to keep rapid tests to use when symptoms appear, rather than using them for socializing. Indeed, perhaps the most consistent thing about the pandemic as a whole has been the lack of consistency in public health responses. Some variations make sense. As the second largest country in the world, Canadians cannot expect the pandemic to unfold the same from coast to coast. But even taking into account the population density and the number of cases, we have still seen drastically different responses across the country.

The fifth wave brings various answers

Faced with the fifth wave, Quebec not only instituted a curfew, but also moved online schools until at least January 17. Ontario, facing a very similar record daily number of cases, continues with a more or less ‘as usual’ approach and has so far only delayed the opening of schools by two days to allow time distribute N95 masks to staff.

Public health experts recommend the use of K / N95 masks to reduce the transmission of Omicron.

Source: Markus Winkler / Pexels

Some universities are returning to distance learning until at least the end of February, while others still maintain that in-person classes will start by mid-January. Some campuses have made the use of N95 masks mandatory, while the majority have yet to change their mask policies. In other words, the question of masking returns to the fore.

COVID-19 Daily Adaptation Study

In March 2020, I launched an online journal study with my students and colleagues to track Canadians’ responses to the pandemic. The masks were not yet discussed at length and the general advice was to leave the PPE to the nursing staff. As such, we did not include questions on masks behaviors or attitudes.

As more data has come in from around the world regarding the relative effectiveness of various types of masks in reducing the spread of COVID-19, the messages about masks have started to change. Canada’s Chief Public Health Officer, Dr. Theresa Tam, first recommended the wearing of non-medical masks indoors on April 6, 2020. At that point, we added questions to our study on people’s attitudes and behaviors regarding masks.

Political polarization of masks

What we couldn’t have predicted in March or April 2020 is how politicized the mask-wearing issue would become. In fact, even the John Hopkins pandemic modeling events failed to account for the potential influence of political polarization and leaders avoiding public health. I don’t need to rehash the controversies that have arisen over the masks; suffice it to say that the issue has torn families apart and catalyzed countless protests.

New recommendations on what kind of masks to wear (eg, N95 versus non-medical masks) are now emerging as we enter the fifth wave of the pandemic with a more transmissible variant. What can we learn from the successes and failures of public health messages regarding masks during the first waves of the pandemic?

After adding questions about masks to our study, 1,527 Canadians participated in our 28-day study. Each participant received a daily link at 6 p.m. to tell us about their day, including questions about wearing the mask. All of the data I’m talking about here was collected before mandatory mask warrants were issued in any jurisdiction in Canada, and therefore the behavior reported by people was based on their own risk assessment and not their will. to follow the law.

What predicts mask wearing behavior and attitudes?

esrannuur / Pexels

People who are older and have more risk factors for serious complications from COVID-19 were more likely to wear masks.

Source: esrannuur / Pexels

Some of what we learned was not so surprising. For example, those most likely to report frequent mask wear and support for issuance of mask warrants were those most at risk for serious complications from COVID-19. Older people, who thought the pandemic was a more or more serious threat, who lived in an urban (vs. rural) area of ​​the country and who had personal risk factors reported the highest frequency of mask wear in the months prior to any mask warrant in Canada.

But, when we looked at support for mask warrants, we started to find more surprising patterns. Specifically, we looked at how patterns of mask mandate support varied before and after May 20, 2020. Why this date? On May 20, 2020, Dr Tam and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced at a press conference that they would personally wear a mask in public. At first glance, this may seem like a harmless announcement, but it is perhaps one of the many seeds from which the controversies surrounding the COVID-19 mask warrants in Canada were born.

For participants who started the study before May 20, believing the pandemic to be severe was associated with more positive attitudes toward the notion of governments mandating the use of masks in public. After May 20, however, the situation changed so that a wide variety of demographic and personality factors predicted attitudes toward mask mandates. Most notably, having more liberal political views and having a lower level of psychological reactance were both associated with greater support for mask mandates, but only for those participants joining the study after the Prime Minister and the Prime Minister’s remarks. Dr Tam. In other words, it appears that prior to the May 20 announcements political opinion had very little to do with Canadians’ attitude towards mask mandates, but after May 20 the political division shifted. started to grow.

Perhaps if other political leaders across the country had immediately followed suit with similar messages, mask-wearing would have become a universal and uncontroversial act of goodwill in a collective battle against COVID-19. Canada might have carved out a history of uniquely Canadian unity in the face of the crisis, but instead we have followed in the footsteps of the divided nation in our south.

Sadly, the polarization around mask wearing only increased after the actual warrants emerged, and they continue today, across the continent. In more conservative regions of the United States and Canada, masks wearing frequencies are lower, as are vaccination rates lower.

Towfiqu barbhuiya / Pexels

What can you do in 2022 to help the world cope with the pandemic?

Source: Towfiqu barbhuiya / Pexels

Will 2022 see the end of the pandemic?

When our article was published, the world had seen 111 million cases of COVID-19 and 2.5 million global citizens had died. Just 8 months later, the number of deaths worldwide has more than doubled to 5.4 million.

Whatever the next round of public health recommendations regarding Wave 5, let’s hope this time the message doesn’t get lost in its association with the messenger. Hopefully the message is delivered clearly by our leaders across the country and by our entire political spectrum. Viruses do not select their hosts based on their political affiliation, so we must do everything possible to help our public health experts get their message across to the public. all Canadians.

As we move into this New Year, let us make a collective resolution to step away from defining the world in terms of “us versus them” and find the shared humanity in each of us. Our ability to make the fifth wave the last wave may depend on our ability to do so.

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Camelus Clothing Launches Online Store Supporting Centric Swap (CNS) Payments http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/camelus-clothing-launches-online-store-supporting-centric-swap-cns-payments/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 17:10:00 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/camelus-clothing-launches-online-store-supporting-centric-swap-cns-payments/ To celebrate the launch of their e-commerce platform that integrates with Centric, Camelus Clothing is offering a 10% sitewide discount for customers paying with CNS throughout the month of January. LONDON (PRWEB) December 30, 2021 Camelus Clothing, a new clothing brand based in the Channel Islands of northwestern Europe, has announced the launch of its […]]]>

To celebrate the launch of their e-commerce platform that integrates with Centric, Camelus Clothing is offering a 10% sitewide discount for customers paying with CNS throughout the month of January.

LONDON (PRWEB) December 30, 2021

Camelus Clothing, a new clothing brand based in the Channel Islands of northwestern Europe, has announced the launch of its e-commerce site. The store, which offers a Centric Swap (CNS) payment option, offers sports and streetwear clothing for both men and women.

Named after the Latin word for “camel,” the company features the silhouette of a camel in front of a pyramid in its logo. The slogan “Stamina / Patience / Endurance” describes the qualities of the namesake and business strategy, according to William Quaranta, founder and CEO.

“At Camelus Clothing, we offer bold styles and designs, made to last and stay in fashion for many years to come,” Quaranta said. “We believe that the ‘fast fashion’ approach to mass-produced, high-turnover clothing is neither good for consumers – who feel compelled to continually buy to stay in fashion – nor for the planet, because of the wastage of continued consumption and the liquidation of stocks. ”

As Camelus will continue to offer new products and designs, they focus on a more sustainable model of delivering products that Quaranta says are “built to last both in durability and in style.” The company does not hold inventory and instead produces items on demand through a network of manufacturing operations positioned in various parts of the world. This distributed production model also reduces shipping costs and environmental impacts compared to distributing across the planet from a single location.

Quaranta said he found a “deep resonance” between the ethics of Camelus and Centric. “I am struck by the Centric team’s commitment to stay the course and create a long-term cryptocurrency that will solve real world problems. Centric truly stands out as a worthy ‘camel’, in a crypto desert crowded with pumps and dumps. ‘donkeys’ and even coins. ”

Camelus is offering customers paying with Centric Cash (CNS) a 10% site-wide discount on all merchandise by the end of January.

“We will convert all Centric Swap (CNS) orders to Centric Rise (CNR) and keep CNR on our long-term balance sheet,” Quaranta said.

Tommy Butcher, COO of Centric, said, “Camelus Clothing is a welcome addition to the growing number of retailers integrating Centric. With the ten percent discount for paying with CNS, now is a great time to add some cool clothes to your wardrobe to get you through 2022 and beyond. “

Learn more about Centric – https://www.centric.com

Read the Centric whitepaper – https://www.centric.com/whitepaper

Visit Camelus Clothing – https://www.camelusclothing.com/

To stay abreast of all the latest developments with Centric, readers can follow Centric on Twitter and join the announcement channel on Telegram.

About Centric

Centric was designed with the vision of one day replacing traditional fiat currencies. Blockchain technology will enable a more transparent world and we believe our innovative approach to achieving long-term widespread adoption sets Centric apart from other cryptocurrencies today.

We believe the biggest barrier to mass adoption of cryptocurrencies is price volatility. Cryptocurrencies, unlike fiat currencies, do not have a central bank to implement a monetary policy focused on stabilizing purchasing power. Thus, variations in demand induce massive price fluctuations. The decentralized model of price discovery has made most of the existing cryptocurrencies nothing more than stocks or commodities, psychologically valued, traded on unregulated stock markets and susceptible to manipulation. The lack of price stability has prevented the formation of credit and debt markets because volatility carries a premium.

While the rest of the industry is focused on transaction throughput and smart contracts, our focus is on solving price stability to realize the economic capabilities that blockchain enables.

About Camelus clothing

The camel is a symbol of endurance, patience, endurance and the achievement of long-term goals, so what better inspiration for our sportswear brand? We design our clothing and run our business with these qualities at the forefront of everything we do.

Our “on-demand” business model means that every item is made specifically for you, we hold no physical inventory, reducing overproduction waste and keeping our environmental impact minimal.

We want our clothes to be bold and to stand the test of time. One thing we hate about the fashion industry is “fast fashion” which is why we aim to work on designs that will stay fresh and popular for years to come. Allowing us to keep the same beaches for several seasons / years.

Our long-term goal is simple: growth.

We will constantly work on new designs and increase our customer base.

For the original version on PRWeb, visit: https://www.prweb.com/releases/camelus_clothing_launches_online_store_supporting_centric_swap_cns_payments/prweb18414194.htm

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Who obtained a doctorate in economics in 2020? http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/who-obtained-a-doctorate-in-economics-in-2020/ Tue, 28 Dec 2021 20:24:17 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/who-obtained-a-doctorate-in-economics-in-2020/ The latest data from the National Science Foundation’s survey of doctorates earned for the 1,216 doctorates in economics awarded in 2020 shows that men outnumber women by almost 2 to 1, 60% of doctorates went to foreigners on temporary visas, and 24 of 493 beneficiaries (about 5%) who were U.S. citizens or permanent residents were […]]]>

The latest data from the National Science Foundation’s survey of doctorates earned for the 1,216 doctorates in economics awarded in 2020 shows that men outnumber women by almost 2 to 1, 60% of doctorates went to foreigners on temporary visas, and 24 of 493 beneficiaries (about 5%) who were U.S. citizens or permanent residents were black.

Some lessons from the data:

Of 1216 doctorates in economics awarded in 2020, 797 (66%) went to men and 419 (34%) to women. By comparison, in physics, 21% of doctorates were awarded to women; in computer and information sciences, also 21%; in math and statistics, 29%; in political science, 39%; in chemistry, also 39%; in management and business administration, 42%; in sociology, 59%; in psychology, 72%.

Data on the race / ethnicity of doctors is only available for those who are US citizens or permanent residents. Here is the breakdown for 2020 and 2019:

The number of doctorates awarded to black U.S. citizens or permanent residents has increased slightly in recent years, from an average of 16 in 2013 to 2017 to an average of 25 in the following three years.

Among the 1,216 holders of doctorates in economics in 2020:

  • About half were married when they graduated. Men and women were equally likely to be married.
  • The median age at completion was 31, the same for women and men.
  • About 12% took five years or less from entering graduate school to graduation, 68% took more than five and up to 10 years, and 20% took more than 10 years. The median was 7.5 years; the median for men was a few months shorter than the median for women.
  • Almost 80% had no debt to graduate studies; half of the rest owed less than $ 20,000. About 85% had no undergraduate debt. (These data do not distinguish between those who did their undergraduate studies abroad and those who did so in the United States)

To read the Hutchins Center report on gender and racial diversity among doctoral economists employed by the federal government in 2020, visit this page.

The data in this article comes from the PhD Earned Survey restricted data analysis system, a survey of 55,000 people who graduated from the previous year. The Hutchins Center report uses data from the American Economic Association’s Committee on the Status of Minority Groups in the Economic Occupation, which is taken from the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System, and differs slightly from the Survey data. with holders of a doctorate.


The Brookings Institution is funded through the support of a wide range of foundations, corporations, governments, individuals, as well as an endowment. A list of donors is available in our annual reports published online here. The results, interpretations and conclusions of this report are those of its author (s) and are not influenced by any donation.

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The Psychology of Selling: 6 Traders’ Tactics That Might Get You To Spend http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/the-psychology-of-selling-6-traders-tactics-that-might-get-you-to-spend/ Mon, 27 Dec 2021 01:23:15 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/the-psychology-of-selling-6-traders-tactics-that-might-get-you-to-spend/ SALES are now in full swing – it feels like there are incentives everywhere to spend, spend, spend. But by being more aware of these subtle ‘nudges’ – sometimes used by retailers to make us spend more than we maybe could have – it might be easier to stay on a budget. The PriceSpy price […]]]>

SALES are now in full swing – it feels like there are incentives everywhere to spend, spend, spend.

But by being more aware of these subtle ‘nudges’ – sometimes used by retailers to make us spend more than we maybe could have – it might be easier to stay on a budget.

The PriceSpy price comparison website (pricespy.co.uk) urges shoppers to beware of failed ‘deals’ and highlights retailer tactics with help from consumer psychologist Cathrine Jansson-Boyd.

Here Jansson-Boyd reveals some of the tactics to watch out for …

1. The most prominent products on websites are not always the best

Jansson-Boyd says, “Many consumers assume that websites prioritize their most popular items. And because we fear that we will miss what is popular, it means that we often buy one of the items that is presented to us first.

“However, often the first things are just the things that companies need to get rid of urgently.”

2. The super practical “buy now” button

Many store website checkouts are incredibly efficient, often using pre-populated information to speed up the process.

Jansson-Boyd says, “You can order everything in seconds if you register all of your information on their sites.

“The faster a person makes a purchase, the better it is for the site because it means the consumer doesn’t have time to rethink their purchases and change their mind.”

3. The hype

Jansson-Boyd adds, “People are social by nature, and they assume there is security in numbers.

“Therefore, when reviews, likes and recommendations are used, it signals to the consumer that an item is tried and tested. It makes it look like the purchase is safe.”

4. The “call” discounts

Retailers sometimes build momentum by offering big discounts on certain items – and once they’ve caught your eye, you might be tempted to start filling your cart.

“Huge discounts are often used to entice consumers to visit stores or websites,” says Jansson-Boyd.

“They are essential in creating what is sometimes called buying momentum. Basically, it happens when one purchase gives you a psychological push to buy another.

“It basically puts consumers in the right frame of mind to shop, and they almost automatically look at what other items they can buy.”

5. “Free” deliveries that encourage you to spend more

Often, websites offer free shipping for expenses greater than a fixed amount. This can work in buyers’ favor sometimes – but if you’re spending a lot more just to get free shipping, ask yourself if it’s really worth it.

Jansson-Boyd says, “Consumers are often happy to meet the spending (free delivery) requirements because they will feel like they haven’t wasted their money on something intangible.

She adds, “From a seller’s perspective, it’s worth noting that many consumers change their mind if a shipping charge is added at the end.”

6. FOMO (fear of missing out)

“People are more affected by the losses than by the gains,” says Jansson-Boyd. “Therefore, people try to avoid the pain of missing something and linger on defeat if they do.

“Because people are afraid of missing out on something they think is a good deal, it can lead them to make hasty decisions that they might later regret.”

FOMO can appear when buyers see terms such as “limited stock available” or “limited time offer”.

HOW TO AVOID EXPENSES …

Buyers can use their own tactics to guard against the urge to splurge. Jansson-Boyd suggests researching what an item normally costs – that way you’ll know if it’s really a bargain.

She says, “Compare these items across multiple sites and use price history and comparison tools to understand the price change over time. buy now ‘prompt. “

And think about how you feel when shopping – for example, if you’re feeling stressed out or looking for an emotional uplift.

There may also be some physical tactics that you can use. When browsing online, Jansson-Boyd suggests not to sit too comfortably – because “you are more likely to view articles online in a less favorable manner.”

She adds, “If you are in a store, avoid touching items and using a shopping cart – you are more likely to buy items that you touch because that generates psychological property.”

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Obituary of Ronald Clark (1942 – 2021) – New Madison, OH http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/obituary-of-ronald-clark-1942-2021-new-madison-oh/ Fri, 24 Dec 2021 22:23:47 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/obituary-of-ronald-clark-1942-2021-new-madison-oh/ Ronald S. Clark, 79, of Greenville, Ohio, died Thursday, December 23, 2021 at the Village Green Health Campus in Greenville.He was born on February 1, 1942 in Birmingham, Alabama, to the late Albert and Rebecca (Griffin) Clark.In addition to his parents, Ron was predeceased by his sister, Pat Phillips.After graduating from high school, Ron continued […]]]>

Ronald S. Clark, 79, of Greenville, Ohio, died Thursday, December 23, 2021 at the Village Green Health Campus in Greenville.
He was born on February 1, 1942 in Birmingham, Alabama, to the late Albert and Rebecca (Griffin) Clark.
In addition to his parents, Ron was predeceased by his sister, Pat Phillips.
After graduating from high school, Ron continued his education at the University of Alabama, where he received his bachelor’s degree in psychology. He then attended the University of Middle Tennessee and obtained his Masters in Psychology. Ron spent over 18 years coaching at various high schools in Tennessee and Florida, then continued as a sales representative for several companies including Jostens and Neff Lettering.
Ron enjoyed being a substitute teacher, watching, playing and coaching football, spending time with his family, and spending time with his beloved dog, Millie. Some of Ron’s greatest accomplishments have been to marry his wonderful wife and have three children, start Renaissance clubs at many local schools, and score three touchdowns in under a minute.
Ron is survived by his wife of 28 years, Lisa (Kessler) Clark, whom he married on March 19, 1994; her children, Caitlyn Clark, Cassidy (Colton) Nealeigh and Carson Clark, all of Greenville; and many nieces and nephews.
Ron’s family will receive friends on Sunday, January 2, 2022 from 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. at the Tribute Funeral Homes, Greenville Campus.
Memorial contributions can be made to Tribute Funeral Homes, supported by Renaissance Clubs, 1000 N. Broadway Street, Greenville, Ohio 45331.
Online condolences can be shared with family by visiting www.tributefuneralhomes.com.
To send flowers to the family or plant a tree in memory of Ronald “Ron” Clark, please visit our tribute store.

Posted by Tribute Funeral Home on December 24, 2021.

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Fall Graduates Cross the Stage on Campus | Texas A&M University-San Antonio http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/fall-graduates-cross-the-stage-on-campus-texas-am-university-san-antonio/ Thu, 23 Dec 2021 01:14:10 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/fall-graduates-cross-the-stage-on-campus-texas-am-university-san-antonio/ Texas A&M University-San Antonio hosted fall 2021 graduates and their friends and family on December 18-19 in three beginning ceremonies. Despite the rain and wind on both days, graduates like Valerie Barrera, who earned a Bachelor of Science in Psychology, were grateful for the university’s attempts to accommodate guests. “(The start) feels more personal here […]]]>

Texas A&M University-San Antonio hosted fall 2021 graduates and their friends and family on December 18-19 in three beginning ceremonies.

Despite the rain and wind on both days, graduates like Valerie Barrera, who earned a Bachelor of Science in Psychology, were grateful for the university’s attempts to accommodate guests.

“(The start) feels more personal here on campus than at the AT&T Center,” Barrera said. “It’s faster and not as long so it was really good.”

The start of the College of Education and Human Development and the start of the College of Business took place on December 18. The College of Arts and Sciences was held on December 19.

Each debut took place in the auditorium, open only to graduates. Each graduate walked across the stage and was treated to 10 guests.

Guests watched live and cheered from various spaces on campus, including a large tent near the recreation area. For those who were unable to attend, all three ceremonies were broadcast live and are available on Youtube.

The father of Jessica Faur, who graduated with a bachelor’s degree in marketing, said he was satisfied with the ceremony.

“(The university) did very well”, Faur, who watched the ceremony from inside the facilities noted. “The broadcast was good… (Jessica) is our first daughter to graduate from college, so we’re very excited for her future.”

Opening remarks for each ceremony were delivered by Vijay Golla, Vice-Rector for Research and Graduate Studies.

Rohan Christie-David, Dean of the Faculty of Commerce, could not attend the ceremony on December 18 due to sickness. President Dr Cynthia Teniente-Matson was also absent from all ceremonies due to sickness.

“… Our university president Dr. Cynthia Teniente-Matson cannot be here today due to illness“Golla said in opening remarks.” While it has been a great disappointment for her, we know the time has come to be careful and protect the health of our fellow members in the community. “

After the closing remarks, the recession was interpreted by Mariachi Damas de Jalisco. Due to the inclement weather, the mariachis could not perform on stage for the start of the College of Education and Human Development and instead performed outdoors in tents afterwards.

The graduates were then able to take photos around the campus, including General the Jaguar.

Ninfa Vela, who got a bachelor of business administration in management, took pictures with his family in the cafeteria. She said the past two semesters have made crossing the stage more meaningful.

“Besides the pandemic, I lost family members and some got terminally ill, which was difficult,” Vela said. “These became the most important semesters because they allowed me to reaffirm the importance of resilience and perseverance. “

Going forward, Vela is leaving San Antonio, but is interested in the online MBA opportunity available at the university in the fall of 2022.

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