Online psychology – Populer Psikoloji http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/ Sun, 10 Oct 2021 23:57:33 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-01T204530.168-150x150.png Online psychology – Populer Psikoloji http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/ 32 32 The greatest similarity between criminal minds and Luther http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/the-greatest-similarity-between-criminal-minds-and-luther/ Sun, 10 Oct 2021 19:22:00 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/the-greatest-similarity-between-criminal-minds-and-luther/ Computer scientists from both shows, namely DS Benny Silver (Michael Smiley), better known as Benny Deadhead, on “Luther”, and Penelope Garcia (Kirsten Vangsness) on “Criminal Minds”, are both avid gamers for a long time. their free time. Their two game experiences become key aspects of the cases in which the team intertwines. In episodes 3 […]]]>

Computer scientists from both shows, namely DS Benny Silver (Michael Smiley), better known as Benny Deadhead, on “Luther”, and Penelope Garcia (Kirsten Vangsness) on “Criminal Minds”, are both avid gamers for a long time. their free time. Their two game experiences become key aspects of the cases in which the team intertwines.

In episodes 3 and 4 of “Luther” Series Two, Luther and the SSU team encounter Robert and Nicholas Millberry, twin brothers who are revealed to be in competition with each other, choosing which crime to commit by rolling the dice. Benny helps figure out the code from the book the two brothers are using, which helps Luther locate the second brother and corner him before he can continue his series of crimes.

Penelope Garcia, the BAU’s computer and tech expert on “Criminal Minds,” also finds her online role-playing hobby becoming crucial to the case, particularly in the Season 1 finale, titled “The Fisher King, Part 1 “and the season 2 premiere, titled” The Fisher King, Part 2 “. The team runs into a serial killer by the name of Randall Garner, who they pursue through both episodes in an attempt to save his next victim. It is revealed that Garcia and Garner were both in the same online game, which Garcia played on the BAU network. This allowed Garner to access BAU systems and discover personal information about the team.

“Luther” is currently available on Hulu and HBO Max, while the first 14 seasons of “Criminal Minds” are available on Paramount +.

]]>
HERBERT GOLUB obituary (2021) – Boxford, MA http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/herbert-golub-obituary-2021-boxford-ma/ Sat, 09 Oct 2021 16:16:05 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/herbert-golub-obituary-2021-boxford-ma/ GOLUB, Herbert PhD Accomplished Psychologist Herbert Golub, Ph.D. was instrumental in passing the Psychologists Licensing Bill and Mandatory Mental Health Coverage for the Insurance Bill as a Chairman of the Legislative Committee and Secretary of the Massachusetts Psychological Association, two major factors in the psychological well-being of Massachusetts residents. Dr. Golub was born in Boston. […]]]>
GOLUB, Herbert PhD Accomplished Psychologist Herbert Golub, Ph.D. was instrumental in passing the Psychologists Licensing Bill and Mandatory Mental Health Coverage for the Insurance Bill as a Chairman of the Legislative Committee and Secretary of the Massachusetts Psychological Association, two major factors in the psychological well-being of Massachusetts residents. Dr. Golub was born in Boston. He practiced the profession of clinical psychologist for almost 50 years. Dr Golub obtained his doctorate. from the University of Minnesota where he met his wife and fellow clinical psychologist, Carol Golub, Ph.D. Dr. Herbert Golub received his undergraduate degree from the University of Massachusetts, then 2 graduate degrees from Boston University. Dr Golub has held faculty positions at Northeastern University, Boston University, Tufts College and Cambridge College. Throughout his career, Dr Golub has maintained a private practice, sharing the home office in Boxford, MA with his wife, Dr Carol Golub. He was a visitor to the American Psychological Association’s site for approximately 30 years, evaluating undergraduate psychology internship programs across the country. He was a chief psychologist at the Melrose and then Haverhill mental health clinics and later a consultant for the Massachusetts Department of Mental Health. Dr Golub also consulted for the Department of Mental Health for a dozen years in Roxbury and Mattapan, which he found particularly rewarding as these were the communities where he was born and raised and which had become heavily populated by minorities and immigrants. He was well known and people waved to him as he passed in his Toyota Supra. For about 30 years, he served as an expert psychologist witness for the Social Security Administration, testifying whether applicants met Social Security disability standards. More recently, Drs. Golub was military family life consultants for the Department of Defense on bases in Germany and Belgium, working with soldiers deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan and with the families they left behind in Europe during their deployment. Dr Golub has participated in many community activities. While residing in Boxford, he served on the school committee of North Shore Technical High School for 6 years. For about 15 years he was elected chairman of the Democratic City of Boxford committee. During that time, he hosted monthly North Shore Democratic municipal committee meetings at which Senator John Kerry spoke when he first ran for office. He was a 32nd degree Mason and a Shriner. He was currently a member of the Martha’s Vineyard Healthy Aging Committee and the Martha’s Vineyard Democratic Council. Herbert and Carol Golub were married in Minneapolis, Minnesota, in 1967. They have a son, Steven, a highly regarded bus driver who drove the National Guard to Ground Zero on September 11. On different occasions, he led President Obama and Vice President Joe Biden to Air Force One meetings. He also led Ted Williams and other players to the All Star Game when he was in Boston several years ago. In 2016, the Golubs retired to Martha’s Vineyard at their Chilmark home for over 20 years. Dr. Golub’s professional pursuits included being an avid Boston sports enthusiast and traveler to many unique destinations including Iceland and Cape Horn at the tip of South America in the same year. He especially enjoyed attending Boston Celtics games via his season tickets during the Larry Bird years. In middle school and high school, he enjoyed going to Fenway Park to get free admission to games after the sixth round. Golubs have traveled extensively in the Caribbean, South America, Europe and New Zealand. Starting in 2008, they wintered in Santa Barbara, California, which became their second home community.

View online memorial for Herbert PhD GOLUB

Published by Boston Globe October 9-10, 2021.

]]>
Brubaker keeps working hard – Times News Online http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/brubaker-keeps-working-hard-times-news-online/ Fri, 08 Oct 2021 12:28:05 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/brubaker-keeps-working-hard-times-news-online/ Posted on October 08, 2021 8:12 AM Until eighth grade, Lucy Brubaker tried her share of sports. It was then that she had Kyle Rusnock as her science teacher, and he encouraged her to try out for the cross country team. “I had tried a number of sports,” Brubaker recalls. “I played soccer for five […]]]>

Posted on October 08, 2021 8:12 AM

Until eighth grade, Lucy Brubaker tried her share of sports.

It was then that she had Kyle Rusnock as her science teacher, and he encouraged her to try out for the cross country team.

“I had tried a number of sports,” Brubaker recalls. “I played soccer for five years in elementary school. I had quit college and thought I needed a change.

“When I had Mr. Rusnock as a teacher, he recruited me to be part of the team. She is such a nice person and I appreciated that from the start. He created a fun environment.

From the start, Brubaker didn’t have a lot of adjustments.

“It just came naturally for me,” Brubaker said of his running debut. “I knew it would reduce my time. I wasn’t that fast when I started, but I kept working.

The oldest remembered the great improvement in her first year when she cut her time from 26 minutes to 23 minutes at the end of the year.

The following season, Brubaker started the year in the 24-minute window and eventually reduced his time to 20 minutes.

COVID slowed its progress last season.

“It was a different year,” Brubaker said of last season. “There were six games, and it was difficult to have a constant rhythm. I knew I had to work hard this summer to get back to where I was.

“We started our preseason earlier than usual, and that should help us all.”

This season, Brubaker opened the season with a time of 24:30 at the Moravian Academy Invitational on September 3.

“I think things are pretty good this year,” she said. “I was around the same time as my second year. I feel good and I think I can get better.

Rusnock has appreciated his contributions over the past four years.

“Lucy has been exceptional since the first day she started running for us,” said Rusnock. “She is a hard worker and takes on any challenges she has faced.

“She always works hard in training, and it has been contagious for the other athletes on the team. So far Lucy has started well this year and I can’t wait for her to post some of her best times.

When not running, Brubaker spends time taking piano lessons. She thanks her teacher, Mary Siddons, for her guidance over the years.

In addition to her running and piano lessons, Brubaker has served as class president for the past three years and has been involved with student council, the National Honor Society, the Brown and White journal, and the Varsity C Club. .

“I’ve been doing this for a long time,” she said. “It’s very different from running. I don’t see it as an escape from running, and it’s something I appreciate. I used to give recitals when I was younger, but I haven’t done any in a while.

Brubaker plans to go to college in the fall, but she hasn’t made up her mind. She embarked on a career in psychology, but she did not finalize her plans. Brubaker has no plans to run in college, but she would join a running club at school.

She begins to realize that her high school cross country career is coming to an end. In the spring, Brubaker will be running the 800 and the 4×400 and 4×800 relays. Looking back, Rusnock and her parents, Andrew and Kim, had the biggest influence on her.

“It’s crazy that this is my last year,” said Brubaker. “It hasn’t really touched me yet. Maybe that will be the case at our senior party this week. It will be difficult for me to understand. “

Until then, Brubaker will be enjoying the moments.

Lucy Brubaker tried her hand at other sports before embarking on cross country.

]]>
Morton Shaevitz obituary (2021) – La Jolla, CA http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/morton-shaevitz-obituary-2021-la-jolla-ca/ Thu, 07 Oct 2021 07:41:05 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/morton-shaevitz-obituary-2021-la-jolla-ca/ Dr Morton Herbert Shaevitz 1935 – 2021 La Jolla Dr. Morton Herbert Shaevitz passed away quietly at his home in La Jolla, Calif. On September 24. He was 86 years old. Morton was a husband, father, author, and psychologist. Known for his commitment to a healthy lifestyle and exercise, few would guess that as a […]]]>
Dr Morton Herbert Shaevitz
1935 – 2021
La Jolla
Dr. Morton Herbert Shaevitz passed away quietly at his home in La Jolla, Calif. On September 24. He was 86 years old. Morton was a husband, father, author, and psychologist. Known for his commitment to a healthy lifestyle and exercise, few would guess that as a young man growing up in Long Beach, he was severely overweight – a weight he lost in a short time. after enrolling at UCLA to pursue studies in psychology. While a student there, he met Diane Orloff, whom he married while studying for his doctorate. After graduating, the two moved to the University of Michigan, where Mort and Diane helped shape the radical ’60s movement on campus and where they raised their children, Erica and Jonathon. An opening at the University of California – San Diego has brought the Shaevitz clan back to California, where Mort will eventually meet his second wife, Marjorie Hansen, with whom he shares a background in psychology. The two would form a personal and professional bond that would last nearly fifty years and give birth not only to two more children – Geoffrey and Marejka – but also to a series of co-authored books on marriage, relationships and gender. a passion for his work which has led to an incredibly varied professional life. He was a staff member or advisor to countless institutions while maintaining a solid practice in working with individuals on the self improvement process. His commitment to his job stemmed from an almost insatiable need to be intellectually challenged – a trait he often said he was proud to have passed on to his children. Mort Shaevitz reluctantly left this land. He found his greatest joy in the exploits of his children and grandchildren. Their happiness and accomplishments, big or small, were his fuel, and his greatest frustration at the end of his life was not knowing what “would come next” for each of them. Mort is survived by his wife, Marjorie; children: Erica, Jonathan, Geoffrey and Marejka as well as their respective spouses John, Karen, Sarah and Adam; and grandchildren: Sam, Jonah, Jack, Rebecca, Annabel and Maisie. The family will be having a celebration of life in a few months and Mort will be the center of attention, the place where he has always been happiest. The family is requesting that commemorative gifts in honor of Mort Shaevitz be sent to the Scripps Health Foundation, where the donations will be designated to support the work of their senior physician in internal medicine, Dr. Gaston Molina. Submissions can be made online or mailed to the Scripps Health Foundation: Box 2669La Jolla, CA 92038 Call: 844-442-4483 (DONATE) Please sign the guestbook online at legacy.com/obituaries/ lajollalight

Posted by La Jolla Light on October 7, 2021.

]]>
More privacy, please – October 2021 | Man’s pepper with trout http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/more-privacy-please-october-2021-mans-pepper-with-trout/ Wed, 06 Oct 2021 18:18:12 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/more-privacy-please-october-2021-mans-pepper-with-trout/ Do you want an easy way to stay on top of important privacy changes? Avoid sleepless nights wondering if you’ve missed a speed bump or pothole between annual updates? Do not worry anymore. Troutman Pepper is happy to offer More privacy, please – a monthly newsletter summarizing important industry and legal developments, as well as […]]]>

Do you want an easy way to stay on top of important privacy changes? Avoid sleepless nights wondering if you’ve missed a speed bump or pothole between annual updates? Do not worry anymore. Troutman Pepper is happy to offer More privacy, please – a monthly newsletter summarizing important industry and legal developments, as well as trends in the areas of cybersecurity, information governance and privacy.

UNITED STATES LAWS AND REGULATIONS

  • The Uniform Data Protection Act: A New Approach to Scoping. The Uniform Laws Commission (ULC) recently approved a final draft of the Uniform Personal Data Protection Act (UPDPA), in the hope of widespread adoption by the state. The final draft departs significantly from existing state privacy laws, especially in its scope. Among other things, the UPDPA applies to organizations that retain personal data, regardless of volume or revenue threshold, unless the organization processes the data “using only compatible data practices”. Compatible data practices are determined taking into account six factors, including the relationship of the data subject with the controller and the type and nature of the data collected. For a more detailed analysis of the UPDPA, click here.

  • Biden will appoint privacy advocate Alvaro Bedoya as FTC commissioner. As detailed in our recent Client Alert, on September 13, President Biden announced his intention to appoint privacy advocate Alvaro Bedoya as Commissioner of the Federal Trade Commission (FTC). Bedoya’s research focuses on the idea that privacy is a civil right, the violation of which involves civil liberties. So, if confirmed, it will likely focus on the damage done to marginalized groups, both in terms of consumer protection and competition. He is also likely to join FTC President Lina Khan in pushing the FTC to adopt a more aggressive enforcement and rule-making agenda.

  • Movement from all sides towards broader oversight of privacy and data security by the FTC. This month, the House Committee on Energy and Commerce voted to allocate $ 1 billion over 10 years to the FTC to establish and operate a new privacy office, which is a significant achievement. significant increase in the FTC budget. This again signals a trend towards broader national oversight of data privacy and security issues. More information can be found here.

  • FTC issues policy statement “On Violations by Health Apps and Other Connected Devices.” “ On September 15, the FTC released a policy statement, “On Violations by Health Apps and Other Connected Devices,” to reiterate the scope of the FTC’s violation notification rule and remind providers of its past guidelines. While the FTC has acknowledged that it “never enforced the [r]ule, ”he warned that the policy statement should“ warn entities of their continued obligation to shed light on violations, ”signaling that it intends to take enforcement action in the future. For entities not covered by HIPAA, this rule kicks in and requires providers of personal health records (PHRs) to notify consumers and the FTC (and in some cases, the media) of violations or significant civil penalties. The FTC specifically “advised mobile health apps to review their obligations under the [r]ule, including through the use of an interactive tool “previously provided by the FTC.

  • The Senate Trade Committee launches a series of hearings on the protection of consumer privacy. On September 29, the Senate Trade Committee held the first in a series of hearings on consumer privacy protection. The hearing, titled “Protecting Consumer Privacy,” covered key topics of discussion, including the need for comprehensive privacy legislation and the recently proposed $ 1 billion FTC Privacy Bureau credit. Senators on both sides expressed general support for the comprehensive privacy legislation, however, it was clear that the parties still disagreed on many of the key substantive provisions. Senators were also divided over the credit offered by the FTC. The next hearing in this series, “Enhancing Data Security”, is scheduled for October 6.

LITIGATION AND ENFORCEMENT IN THE UNITED STATES

  • State secrets privilege prevents Wikimedia’s upstream surveillance case. On September 15, the Fourth Circuit determined that the state secrets privilege required the rejection of the Wikimedia Foundation’s case against the National Security Agency (NSA) for allegedly spying on Wikimedia communications via “upstream surveillance.” Upstream monitoring involves collecting communications as they travel across the Internet with the help of telecommunications service providers. In Wikimedia Foundation v. National security agency, Wikimedia and eight other plaintiffs argued, among other things, that the NSA’s upstream surveillance violated the First and Fourth Amendments. During the jurisdictional discovery, however, the NSA invoked state secret privilege, allowing it to withhold information if disclosure could harm national security. The Fourth Circuit determined that because there is “simply no conceivable defense” to Wikimedia’s claims that would not also reveal how the NSA conducted upstream surveillance, the court must dismiss Wikimedia’s claims in favor. national security.

  • CFPB is seeking feedback on study plans for electronic disclosure on mobile devices. On September 10, the comment period on the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s (CFPB) information collection initiative, “Electronic Disclosure on Mobile Devices” ended. The CFPB issued the initial request on August 11, before seeking formal approval of the initiative from the Bureau of Management and Budget. The CFPB intends to conduct several studies using methodologies rooted in psychology and behavioral economics to understand electronic disclosure on mobile devices.

  • The CFPB publishes the long-awaited notice of a draft regulation on the collection of data on loans to small businesses. On September 1, the CFPB issued a 900+ page notice of regulatory proposal (NPRM) to implement small business loan data collection requirements under Section 1071 of the Dodd- Act. Frank on Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection. This rule applies to “covered financial institutions”, which are broadly defined and include a variety of entities that engage in small business loans. Financial institutions should take this rule into account when determining what types of customer information to collect and retain. To read a more detailed summary of the proposal, click here.

  • Tims v. Black Horse Carriers, Inc. The decision clarifies the limitation periods for BIPA claims. On September 17, the Illinois Court of Appeals released its long-awaited decision in Tims v. Black Horse Carriers, Inc., 2021 IL App (1st) 200563 (1st Dist. Sept. 17, 2021), dealing with the applicable limitation period for claims invoked under the Illinois Biometric Information Privacy Act (BIPA). The question before the court asked which statute of limitations should apply to BIPA claims: the Illinois “catch-all” statute of limitations or the one-year statute of limitations used in actions involving a publication “violating the right to privacy ”. The court ultimately concluded that the claims under Sections 15 (c) and (d) of the BIPA followed the one-year limitation period, while the claims under Sections 15 (a), (b) and (e) BIPA benefited from the longer five-year period. limits. For more information on the recent ruling, please see our Troutman Pepper Legal Alert available here.

INTERNATIONAL REGULATIONS AND APPLICATION

  • New UK standards for digital services for children come into force, providing a framework for the new US law. On September 2, the UK’s Age-Appropriate Design Code (also known as the ‘Children’s Code’) came into effect. The Children’s Code designates a set of 15 flexible standards that apply to online services, such as apps, online games, and websites and social media, that may be viewed by children. Notably, US lawmakers have urged online companies, such as Microsoft, Walt Disney, and Nintendo, to comply with the Children’s Code in the United States. In fact, Representative Kathy Castor recently introduced an update to the Privacy of Our Vulnerable Children and Youth Act (the Children’s Privacy Act), which incorporates key elements of the Code of to amend the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA). If enacted, the Kids PRIVCY Act would create a protected class of adolescents beyond the enforcement of COPPA (that is to say, children aged 13 to 17) and apply to all sites “likely to be viewed by children and adolescents”, not just “children-only” services. The Kids PRIVCY Act would also repeal the safe harbor regulations allowing industry self-regulation. To learn more about the 15 flexible standards of the Children’s Code, click here.

  • The new EU CCPs come into force on September 27. From September 27, all new data transfer agreements under the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) must use the new Standard Contractual Clauses (CPS) updated in June to reflect the Court’s decisions. justice of the European Union. Schrems II Organizations have until December 27, 2022 to migrate existing SCC agreements to integrate new SCCs. To learn more about the new SCCs, click here.

  • EMSA imposes trade repository fines of € 238,500 for data breaches occurring over a two-year period. The European Securities and Markets Authority (ESMA), the EU’s stock market regulator, has fined UnaVista Ltd., a UK-based trade repository, € 238,500 for eight violations of the European regulation on market infrastructures (EMIR). The EMIR regulation requires trade repositories like UnaVista to regularly provide information to regulators on various aspects of their business. According to a public notice from ESMA, over a two-year period, UnaVista (1) mishandled data that resulted in incorrect or unreliable regulatory reporting, and (2) failed to provide regulators with direct access and immediately to the required information. This fine emphasizes the importance of maintaining adequate data integrity and providing rapid regulatory access.

]]>
The vaccines are there. The school is open. Some parents are still suffering | News, Sports, Jobs http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/the-vaccines-are-there-the-school-is-open-some-parents-are-still-suffering-news-sports-jobs/ Wed, 06 Oct 2021 04:45:22 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/the-vaccines-are-there-the-school-is-open-some-parents-are-still-suffering-news-sports-jobs/ This photo provided by Amber Cessac shows Amber Cessac taking a selfie while her daughters do their homework at their Georgetown, Texas home on September 9, 2021. A year and a half later, families are still agonizing over the pandemic. There is always the exhaustion of worrying about exposure to COVID-19 itself, and the policies […]]]>

This photo provided by Amber Cessac shows Amber Cessac taking a selfie while her daughters do their homework at their Georgetown, Texas home on September 9, 2021. A year and a half later, families are still agonizing over the pandemic. There is always the exhaustion of worrying about exposure to COVID-19 itself, and the policies in schools and daycares where children spend their time. The spread of the more infectious delta variant, especially among people who refuse vaccinations, has caused a sharp increase in infections in children. But there are also COVID exposures and illnesses – and even minor colds – in schools and daycares that mean children are being sent home, forcing parents to scramble for babysitting. (Amber Cessac via AP)

PHOENIX (AP) – Eight days after the start of the school year, Amber Cessac’s five daughters, aged 4 to 10, had tested positive for COVID-19.

Having them all sick at once and worrying about the long term repercussions as other parents in their school, and even her own mother, downplayed the importance of the virus, “broke something inside of me” said Cessac.

“Anxiety and stress have sort of been suppressed”, she said. “It was just, I don’t know, to win and I felt so helpless.”

Like parents around the world, Cessac has been dealing with pandemic stress for over 18 months now.

There is exhaustion in worrying about the disease itself, made worse by the spread of the more infectious delta variant, especially in people who refuse vaccinations, which has caused a surge in infections in children. .

The online school has disrupted the education of children and the work of parents. Then, returning from school in person this year resulted in increased exposures and community tensions as parents argued over appropriate protocols. The politicization of masks, vaccines and withdrawals has left many parents exhausted. Deciding what is acceptable for children and what is not can seem difficult.

“Parents are exhausted to a level we have never seen before” said Amanda Zelechoski, professor of psychology at Purdue Northwest University, who co-founded the website and nonprofit Pandemic Parenting. “We’ve been in survival mode for a year and a half now and it’s relentless.”

Schools are a constant concern for many. There is evidence that masks in schools help reduce the spread of the virus, and a majority of Americans support the requirement for masks for students and teachers. But it breaks down strongly along partisan lines.

Some Republican governors have tried to ban mask mandates.

District policies on masks, testing, and quarantines vary widely. Shortly after schools reopened in August, the rate of coronavirus infections forced dozens of districts to forgo in-person learning.

The four oldest girls from the Cessac charter school go to the suburb of Austin, Texas, do not need masks. Her children, who are too young to be vaccinated, told her they were among only a handful of children in their classes wearing masks. But she sent them back to school as they recovered.

“It’s not better elsewhere” she said. “All moms, we feel stuck in this situation. There is nothing we can do.

More than 5.5 million children in the United States have tested positive for COVID-19, with 20% of all child cases since the start of this school year, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics. Children are at less risk of serious illness or death, but at least 498 have died.

Vaccines have been available for children as young as 12 since May, but vaccination rates have lagged behind adults. Federal data shows that about half of 16 and 17 year olds are vaccinated, while 43% of 12 to 15 year olds are; two-thirds of American adults are vaccinated.

And if a vaccine for young children is expected before the end of the year, they remain more vulnerable. Many parents felt confused about how best to protect them. “You still had parents struggling with decisions and what is safe for my family, and feeling left behind or invisible because other segments of society may have moved on.” Zelechoski said.

More than one million students dropped out of U.S. public schools in the 2020 school year, which was marked by widespread distance classes. It is not yet known what happened this school year, but the fights for mask mandates have led some parents to alternatives.

Sheila Cocchi, a single mom still struggling with health issues after suffering from COVID-19 in February, pays a teacher to teach her at home for 10 hours a week with an online program. She also works from home in Fernandina Beach, Florida, just north of Jacksonville.

“Last year it was like it was OK, the whole world went crazy and we all have to adjust to that. Now it’s a different kind of stress ”, she said. “We are trying to get this under control as a nation, or at least as a state, and there are so many people who are not participating in it. I would like my children to go to school as much as anyone.

Other parents say they know being back to school is best for their kids, and they just hope it doesn’t matter.

In Fort Worth, Texas, Heather Buen, who works for a local utility and is a Democratic political organizer, asks her children to wear masks and wash their hands, even when other children or even teachers don’t. do not.

“It’s a lot of effort to maintain that” she said.

She believes seeing their father, an electrician, get COVID-19 helped scare them into sticking to preventative measures. The five children at the school did not get sick and Buen said she felt reassured as it appears that more students and staff are wearing masks now than at the start of the school year. Yet parents in three districts, including his own, sued, claiming that schools violate students’ constitutional rights because there is no mask mandate.

Lawsuits, fights in school boards, disagreements between family members and friends are also a source of stress.

“The denigration on both sides was the most difficult thing”, said Sarah Brazwell, who has a 3-year-old in daycare and a 9-year-old in elementary school. She is not ready to get the vaccine and wearing masks in her home town of Florida Panhandle is “a little unnecessary” she said, because so few people do.

Child care – finding her, paying for her, worrying about the spread of disease – has been a huge stress during the pandemic. Labor is scarce and it can be difficult to find a place. Infections and exposures, and even minor colds in child care centers, can mean children being sent home for days or weeks, causing parents to scramble repeatedly to get babysitting.

Deanna Manbeck, chair of the board of directors for her child’s small nonprofit daycare in Wilmington, Delaware, bears the brunt of the blame on about 20 families there. Masks are compulsory for teachers but not vaccines lest staff resign.

“How could I tell parents that we can no longer take care of their children and that they must find a new center on an optional mandate? As a mother, I want all teachers to be vaccinated, but we are not in a position to impose them ”, she said.

Jeff Sheldon and his wife began interviewing nannies for their two sons, a 3-year-old and a baby, after daycare closures and common childhood illnesses kept their children at home for weeks at a time this summer. He and his wife took sick leave and worked from home. Their mothers also helped.

“We cannot continue to live with the uncertainty of the closing of the courses at all times” he said of daycare in Lincoln, Nebraska, noting that his eldest son had thrived there.

While Sheldon was more able than his wife, who works for the public school system, to work from home, the pandemic has underscored the burden on women, especially the balance between childcare and work, and millions women have left the labor market.

Taking time off was a brief consideration for Dr. Ankita Modi, a pediatrician in Charlotte, North Carolina. She was upset at the very thought of crossing her mind, she said, but she was so desperate. In her school district, masks are optional, there is no distance school option, and she says contact tracing is ineffective. Local health officials agreed and threatened legal action against the district before agreeing to new proceedings in late September.

Her youngest child, 11, is not old enough to be vaccinated; the other two are. “It is as if you knowingly expose them to a real and concrete risk every day” she said. “That, as a parent, is really annoying. I don’t think anyone has slept well since school started.

The latest news today and more in your inbox

]]>
Harper partners with SIU for new undergraduate courses: Harper College http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/harper-partners-with-siu-for-new-undergraduate-courses-harper-college/ Tue, 05 Oct 2021 17:29:04 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/harper-partners-with-siu-for-new-undergraduate-courses-harper-college/ Harper College students can pursue a range of new bachelor’s options due to a new partnership with Southern Illinois University. On Tuesday, heads of Illinois institutions officially signed two agreements that provide students with a valuable opportunity to earn a bachelor’s degree near home and graduate from the SIU, either through the Harper College Academic […]]]>

Harper College students can pursue a range of new bachelor’s options due to a new partnership with Southern Illinois University.

On Tuesday, heads of Illinois institutions officially signed two agreements that provide students with a valuable opportunity to earn a bachelor’s degree near home and graduate from the SIU, either through the Harper College Academic Center. or online through the Saluki Step Ahead program.

“SIU Carbondale is committed to providing access, affordability and removing barriers for all students,” said SIU Carbondale Chancellor Austin Lane. “We are proud of our beautiful campus and the top-notch education and opportunities that Salukis receives. But we understand that not all Chicago students can move to Carbondale to complete their education, so we will be bringing SIU Carbondale to Windy City. ”

SIU brings its strong programs in accounting, paralegal studies, and public safety management to the University Center on the Harper campus. Programs are taught by UES faculty and delivered in a blended learning environment, combining the flexibility of online learning with on-campus coursework and resources.

All three SIU degree programs build on the success of the University Center, which also offers bachelor’s degrees in partnership with DePaul University, Northern Illinois University, and Roosevelt University.

“Since opening in 2018, the Harper College University Center has been a game-changer for students and their families,” said Avis Proctor, President of Harper College. “The number of registrations has increased to more than 330 students. Over 50 students have successfully completed their program. And those numbers continue to climb every semester.

SIU Harper Dr Proctor Dr Lane AgreementIn addition to hosting SIU at the University Center, Harper joined SIU’s Saluki Step Ahead program, which enables qualified community college graduates to attend SIU Carbondale remotely to pursue undergraduate studies in accounting, business and administration, criminology and criminal justice, health care management, psychology and radiological sciences. Students in the program pay Harper’s tuition fees for their first two years. In the third and fourth years, they receive an annual scholarship of $ 4,000. The goal is to enable them to graduate for $ 25,000 or less.

“We are pleased to partner with Harper College to open more avenues for students with limited options,” said Dr Lane. “Whether they take the SIU Carbondale courses online or at the University Center, we will welcome them as Salukis. Today’s agreement fits well with our Imagine strategic plan, whose pillars include improving student success and enhancing partnerships.

Dr Proctor noted that the pillars of the SIU align with Harper’s mission of uplifting his communities, highlighting the university center as a gateway not only to bachelor’s degrees, but also to career opportunities and strong paychecks.

“Partnering with SIU through the Saluki Step Ahead program and our university center offers valuable new pathways to a bachelor’s degree for students, especially adult learners who can handle jobs, families and other commitments,” Dr Proctor said. “These new ventures present a tremendous opportunity for students, families and, ultimately, our communities. ”

]]>
Coronababies or Covidivorces: the effects of COVID on couples http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/coronababies-or-covidivorces-the-effects-of-covid-on-couples/ Tue, 05 Oct 2021 00:08:21 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/coronababies-or-covidivorces-the-effects-of-covid-on-couples/ The COVID-19 pandemic has, among other things, had the paradoxical effect of removing many people from their occasional social interactions while placing them in prolonged forced confinement with their intimate partners. While the effects of this sudden change are bound to be huge, they are unlikely to be straightforward. Source: mohamed hassan for pixabay An […]]]>

The COVID-19 pandemic has, among other things, had the paradoxical effect of removing many people from their occasional social interactions while placing them in prolonged forced confinement with their intimate partners. While the effects of this sudden change are bound to be huge, they are unlikely to be straightforward.

Source: mohamed hassan for pixabay

An early and justified concern in this unprecedented situation was the safety of people (mainly women and children) in abusive relationships. Research has shown that domestic violence tends to increase during times of social unrest, public health emergencies, and large-scale disasters. The specific nature of the pandemic – forcing families to stay indoors and isolating them from community relationships and outside resources – presents unique risks for those who were already at risk prior to the domestic violence pandemic.

Beyond this obvious worry, the picture was to become darker. Indeed, it didn’t take long for the media to predict the surge in divorce filings, the increase in online searches for breakup advice, the boom in divorce deal sales and the surge in divorce. divorce rate.

These doomsday scenarios, alas, were quickly contradicted by preliminary data suggesting that divorces declined in 2020 and that most people felt a greater appreciation for their spouse and a deeper commitment to their relationships. The New York Times, covering all bases, reported talking about waves coming from both ‘coronbabies’ and ‘covidivores’.

So what is it ? Do intimate partners rekindle their flames or read to catch fire? Will the pandemic strengthen or unravel the bonds of intimacy? Who is right, those who predict that couples will succumb or those who anticipate that they will win?

In the old joke, a quarreling couple seeks marriage advice from the rabbi. The wife comes in first and produces a litany of complaints about her naughty husband, which is certainly the cause of their troubles.

“You are right,” said the rabbi.

After she leaves, the husband enters, recounting his own myriad of complaints about his bad wife, who is definitely to blame for their problems.

“You are right,” said the rabbi.

After they both left, the concierge, who was listening from the hallway, came in to confront the rabbi: “Forgive my chutzpah,” he said, “but the woman said one thing and you told her that ‘ she was right. The husband said the opposite and you told him he was right. That does not make sense !

“You are also right,” said the rabbi.

A study on the impact of the pandemic on couples

Relationships are complicated systems and they respond to challenges in complicated ways. Useful insight into one aspect of this complexity can be found in a recent (2020) study by Hannah Williamson of the University of Texas at Austin, which examined the potential impact of the pandemic on couples’ relationships. Williamson collected data from 654 participants three times between December 2019 and April 2020.

The participants (60% female; 92% heterosexual; 82% white) were all adult couples (couples, engaged or married) from various socio-economic circumstances and residing in the United States. Forty-one percent of the participants had children living with them.

Williamson collected data on three outcome variables:

  1. Relationship satisfaction: “overall feeling of participants towards the relationship”.
  2. Causal attributes of the relationship: The causes that participants attributed to negative partner behavior (example quiz item: “The reason my partner criticized me is not likely to change”).
  3. Responsibility-Attribution: “The extent to which participants view the behaviors of their partners as intentional, selfishly motivated and blameworthy (i.e.

Williamson also examined several potential “moderating variables”, factors that may affect the link between sequestration of the pandemic and couples’ outcomes. These included demographic measures such as household income, education, relationship length and status, and children at home, and psychological variables, including negative experiences with the pandemic (i.e. : “How well do you think you and your partner have worked together as a team?”) And relationship conflict (for example: “This section asks questions about how you and your partner have been doing since the start of the pandemic. coronavirus’).

The results showed moderate levels of negative experiences among participants linked to the pandemic. The three most widely shared concerns were concerns about the health of family members, feelings of isolation from others, and difficulty obtaining favorite foods. However, the average relationship satisfaction did not change significantly.

Demographic variables (income, education, relationship status, cohabitation status, length of relationship, and presence of children in the home) did not affect relationship satisfaction, causal attributions or responsibilities attributions; neither do the pandemic-related negative experiences and stress levels. However, levels of relational adaptation and relational conflict moderated changes in all three outcome variables (relationship satisfaction, causal attributions, and responsibility attributions).

Specifically, “among people with higher levels of adaptation, relationship satisfaction increased and attributions of causation and responsibility decreased, while among people with lower levels of adaptation, satisfaction with the relationship declined, causal assignments increased, and responsibility assignments remained stable.

Conversely, “among individuals with lower levels of conflict, relationship satisfaction increased and attributions of causation and responsibility decreased, while among individuals with higher levels of conflict, relationship satisfaction has declined, causal allocations have increased, and liability allocations have remained stable.

In other words, couples forced into escrow at the start of the pandemic have not experienced an overall deterioration in their relationship satisfaction. In fact, the author notes, many participants became more forgiving and blamed their partner’s negative behaviors less, attributing them to the pandemic rather than their partner’s faults. However, the picture is not uniform. The results correspond to a variation of the phenomenon “the rich get richer” with regard to responses to the pandemic. Stronger couples benefited, while weaker couples suffered more.

The author notes that more data is needed to clarify whether these observed trends hold over the long term and whether differences between couples in their response to the pandemic may later translate into systematic differences in important life outcomes. such as marriage, divorce and procreation decisions.

But in the short term, it appears that the effects of the pandemic on couples’ relationships can go both ways, accentuating strengths and exacerbating weaknesses. Stronger couples tended to overcome, while struggling couples perhaps became more likely to succumb.

In a way, then, everyone’s predictions were, well, law.

]]>
Boba culture gets closer to Lincoln Park http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/boba-culture-gets-closer-to-lincoln-park/ Mon, 04 Oct 2021 03:01:20 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/boba-culture-gets-closer-to-lincoln-park/ Pearl tea, pearl milk tea, or boba – whatever you call it, just be delighted that the flavor concoction has caught on on campus. TSAoCAA, pronounced “tao-tah,” joined the handful of stores specializing in freshly brewed tea when it debuted on September 10, located at 1337 W Fullerton Avenue. Before entering the well-lit cafe, passers-by […]]]>

Pearl tea, pearl milk tea, or boba – whatever you call it, just be delighted that the flavor concoction has caught on on campus.

TSAoCAA, pronounced “tao-tah,” joined the handful of stores specializing in freshly brewed tea when it debuted on September 10, located at 1337 W Fullerton Avenue.

Before entering the well-lit cafe, passers-by can already glimpse the blossoming fruit and 12 different tea bases displayed on the counter through the large mirrored windows.

Owner Jack Shi is responsible for sourcing every store and market in town for the best ingredients.

“When I graduated in 2010, most tea shops only used powder instead of loose leaves,” Shi said. “It’s not very healthy.

Shi and his wife, Jenny Zheng, decided to franchise TSAOCAA in Chicago, a Chinese chain currently spread across Pennsylvania and Nevada, known for using natural ingredients.

In addition to using fresh tea, the couple also make their amber tapioca on site and refuse to use store-bought syrup and frozen fruit.

“The key code is not to buy too much,” Shi said in a telephone interview as he pulled into the sidewalk and prepared for another day of fruit picking. “Just buy the freshest quality.”

Anne Saw, Associate Professor in DePaul’s Department of Psychology, was one of TSAOCAA’s first clients.

Saw visited the new business after her Asian American college colleague “alerted” her to the opening upon seeing her on Instagram.

“My family and I went last weekend and wanted to extend a little grace as it was their opening weekend,” Saw said. “I’m sure they are [still] solve problems.

In addition to being a professor of clinical and community psychology, Saw also teaches Asian American cuisine at Explore Chicago, an experiential learning course for first-year students to help them integrate into the city.

One of the topics of the class last Friday was how the boba generation came about and how for many Asian Americans the boba is deeper than your usual 500ml plastic cup.

“In all communities, but you could say, especially in communities whose histories and cultures are not widely taught or shared, food is often a means for those who live in [the] community to strengthen ties and develop knowledge of pride in their cultures and histories, ”Saw said. “Boba is one of those foods that is uniquely Taiwanese, but has been widely adopted by Asian Americans and non-Asian Americans.”

Soon after Shi and Zheng opened their first TSAOCAA branch in Chinatown in December 2018, they decided it was time to expand.

Almost three years later, this is their Lincoln Park branch.

“Chinatown’s clientele is mostly Asian Americans and we are doing very well there,” said Shi. “Now I want to remove our name from Asia [American] population.”

Much like Saw, Sumana Syed, a sophomore at Columbia College Chicago, also heard about the new venture on social media.

To be a “heavy drinker of boba [who has] tried so many kinds of drinks and different flavors, ”Syed had to pay a visit.

Syed even convinced his sister to join this boba adventure.

Syed ordered the oolong sakura milk tea with strawberry boba with 70 percent sweetness and less ice cream.

“It was really good and just the right amount of sweetness,” said Syed, who previously worked at OneZo, a boba store in Texas. “It also made me nostalgic for the drinks I have at home.”

In addition to their specialty teas like the ones Syed tried, the newly opened cafe also offers food options such as Korean fried chicken, takoyaki (Japanese snack in the shape of a ball made from flour-based dough and octopus), bingsu (Korean dessert of crushed ice) and many others.

The couple-turned-business partner not only emphasizes the freshness of the tea and fruit, but also their chicken.

However, with that comes a higher price tag, which Shi recognizes.

“Our fried chicken might be more expensive, but it’s worth it,” Shi said. “It’s crispy on the outside and tender on the inside from the olive oil mixture. [that] makes all the difference.

To make it more accessible, TSAOCAA in Lincoln Park is offering a 10 percent discount for DePaul students and lunch menus for $ 10.95.

Lunch menus are accompanied by your choice of flavors of Korean Boneless Fried Chicken, French Fries and Soda. This is valid from Monday to Friday from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.

]]>
Morton Shaevitz obituary (2021) – San Diego, California http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/morton-shaevitz-obituary-2021-san-diego-california/ Sun, 03 Oct 2021 07:27:04 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/morton-shaevitz-obituary-2021-san-diego-california/ Dr Morton Herbert Shaevitz1935 – 2021 San DiegoIt is with great sadness that the family of Morton Herbert Shaevitz, Ph.D., ABPP, announce his passing on September 24 from advanced colorectal cancer. Morton was born in New York City in 1935 to Russian and Polish immigrant couple, Dorothy and Arthur. He spent his early years in […]]]>

Dr Morton Herbert Shaevitz
1935 – 2021
San Diego
It is with great sadness that the family of Morton Herbert Shaevitz, Ph.D., ABPP, announce his passing on September 24 from advanced colorectal cancer. Morton was born in New York City in 1935 to Russian and Polish immigrant couple, Dorothy and Arthur. He spent his early years in this city, but during World War II his family, including his beloved grandmother, “Grandma Molly”, moved to Long Beach, California. Mort attended elementary and secondary schools in Long Beach, then UCLA, where he received his bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees. in clinical psychology. In college, Mort met and married another UCLA student, Diane Orloff. After completing his doctorate, they moved to Ann Arbor, Michigan, where he became associate director of consulting services at the University of Michigan. In Michigan, Mort and Diane had two children, Erica and Jonathon. In 1969, while Mort was on a consulting visit with Dr. Carl Rogers at the Center for Studies of the Person, he learned that a position was opening at the University of California – San Diego. He got the post of director of counseling and psychology, moved the family west, and worked at the university until 1977. Over the years, Mort has also taught courses on gender bias. , Mediation and Conflict Management at the University of San Diego and worked in various positions at Scripps Clinic Medical Group, most notably as Director of Behavioral Health, from 1978 to 1993. Through the 2000s and until Until recently, Mort was Associate Clinical Professor for the Department of Psychiatry at UCSD, worked as a therapist with his own practice, Shaevitz & Associates, and provided executive advice through his firm MHS Consulting, all at La Jolla. Diane and Mort divorced in the early 1970s and a few years later married Marjorie Hansen Shaevitz, a marriage and family therapist. In the mid-1970s, they had two children, Geoffrey and Marejka. Mort and Marjorie have worked together as therapists, but have also written books together, including “Making It Together as a Two Career Couple”. On his own, Mort also wrote “Lean & Mean: The No Hassle, Life-Extending Weight Loss Program for Men”, “Sexual Static: How Men Confuse the Women They Love”, for Little Brown and Company, and in 2015, he and Ken Blanchard wrote “Refire! Make the rest of your life the best of your life,” published by Berrett-Koehler. In addition to books, Dr. Shaevitz enjoyed writing articles and public speaking. He has written dozens of professional and academic articles and has given numerous presentations across the country. Towards the end of his life, he wrote articles for Psychology Today and the California Psychologist. But what pleased him the most were his four children: Erica, Jonathon, Geoffrey and Marejka and their respective spouses / partners: John Huggins (Los Angeles), Karen Blumberg (New York), Sarah Moses (Los Angeles) and Adam Downey (Columbus, Ohio). He loved spending time with his four grown grandchildren: Sam and Jonah Huggins and Rebecca and Jack Shaevitz and couldn’t believe it when he became a grandfather again. During the 2010s, Mort was delighted to add Annabel, 5, and Maisie Jade, 4. A celebration of life will be given in his honor by his family in a few months. The family asks for this memorial. Gifts in honor of Mort Shaevitz will be sent to the Scripps Health Foundation, where donations will go to support the work of his senior internal medicine physician, Dr. Gaston Molina. / memorialdonationsScripps Health Foundation P.O. Box 2669 La Jolla, CA 92038 Call: 844-442-4483 (DONNER)

Posted by San Diego Union-Tribune on October 3, 2021.

]]>