Psychologist – Populer Psikoloji http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 06:12:03 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-01T204530.168-150x150.png Psychologist – Populer Psikoloji http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/ 32 32 A group of Japanese psychologists offer support to Ukrainian evacuees http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/a-group-of-japanese-psychologists-offer-support-to-ukrainian-evacuees/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 05:37:04 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/a-group-of-japanese-psychologists-offer-support-to-ukrainian-evacuees/ More than 1,000 people have been evacuated from Ukraine to Japan since the start of the Russian military operation. Some struggle to adjust to life abroad and struggle with mental health issues. A group of psychologists in Japan launched a hotline to help these evacuees. The Japanese Society of Board Certified Clinical Psychologists began offering […]]]>

More than 1,000 people have been evacuated from Ukraine to Japan since the start of the Russian military operation. Some struggle to adjust to life abroad and struggle with mental health issues. A group of psychologists in Japan launched a hotline to help these evacuees.

The Japanese Society of Board Certified Clinical Psychologists began offering the service on June 1. People calling the hotline can communicate with psychologists in Ukrainian, Russian, English or Japanese.

Okumura Mariko is the senior executive director of the group. She explained that the evacuees faced challenges before arriving in Japan. Many felt their lives were in danger.
Some have been forced to leave loved ones behind in Ukraine.

Okumura also said evacuees are facing new hardships in Japan. They have to adapt to a totally different lifestyle. Russia’s aggression continues and many evacuees do not know when they will be able to return home.

The Senior Executive Director added: “There is not much our service can do. But we hope evacuees can feel that there is a place where their anxieties are understood.

The hotline is available on Wednesdays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. local time. The group says that a session lasts about 30 minutes. People providing support to evacuees can also use the helpline. The group says that some of them may want to consult the psychologists. The service is for people in Japan only.

The phone number is 03-3813-9990.

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How I cope with feelings of envy by saying the Arabic word ‘mashallah’ | Friendship http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/how-i-cope-with-feelings-of-envy-by-saying-the-arabic-word-mashallah-friendship/ Sun, 26 Jun 2022 12:00:00 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/how-i-cope-with-feelings-of-envy-by-saying-the-arabic-word-mashallah-friendship/ I doesn’t often feel envy and it’s not because I don’t know anyone worthy of it. The people in my life are just brilliant. My friends and family are talented writers whose books and magazines I proudly display on my shelves. They are learned psychologists, motivated designers, artists and poets whose work moves me deeply. […]]]>

I doesn’t often feel envy and it’s not because I don’t know anyone worthy of it. The people in my life are just brilliant. My friends and family are talented writers whose books and magazines I proudly display on my shelves. They are learned psychologists, motivated designers, artists and poets whose work moves me deeply. It’s easy to celebrate their most recent successes, to which I say:Mashallah.

Being a raised Muslim, mashallah is an Arabic expression that I use often, if not daily. Most commonly spelled as mashallah or mashaAllah, the most accurate way to represent the phrase in transliteration is ma sha Allah, meaning: “What God willed has happened.” In many cultures, saying mashallah is believed to protect a person from the evil eye. Another way of looking at it is that it shifts the focus from potential envy to admiration, gratitude, and respect.

“Language and emotion are intrinsically linked,” says psychologist Dr Emma Hepburn. “Having more finely tuned emotional words to describe our feelings is proven to benefit us. The language we use to ourselves and others, both verbally and in writing, can have an impact about how we feel. Kind words can calm and regulate us, while harsh words can create a response to threat.

Perhaps by saying a phrase that actively seeks to protect the recipient from the threat of envy, I inadvertently protected myself from letting envy get the better of me.

One of my earliest memories of craving someone intensely was in the winter when I was about eight years old. My best friend came to school with the most amazing cardigan I’ve ever seen. It was stocky and had small sheep and cow appliqués on the front, spun wool in green tufts for the trees, and towards the shoulders were cream-colored quilted clouds. Meanwhile, I wore the same thing I wore every day: a thin black acrylic sweater that no longer reached the knuckles of my bony wrists. I imagined how gorgeous I would feel wrapped in something as fabulous as a farmhouse cardigan. I also imagined what it would be like to see my best friend accidentally spill the powder paints we were mixing everywhere that day. I accidentally imagined on purpose spilling the paint on the cardigan myself, and for a moment the thought made me feel good. And then I remembered that she was the only person who had bothered to befriend me after weeks of orbiting the perimeter of the playground alone. Burning shame colored my cheeks red as I stirred my paint, because it is the color of shame – the color of blood.

The color of envy is green. The green-eyed monster. The grass is always greener. Envy is considered a dark emotion. Not as sexy as anger can be perceived, while melancholy and sadness can be shaped to suggest depth of character. Envy, however, is something to hide in the shadows of ourselves. I’m thinking of the viral meme of Kermit the Frog standing across from his doppelganger in a black hooded robe. We are presented with the binary forces of good versus evil, with the understanding that the shadow Kermit represents all of our darkest thoughts and impulses, a mirror of the positive aspect of ordinary Kermit. The fact that the dialogue within these memes presents conflict underscores this polarity. In my meme, the text above regular Kermit would read, “But she’s my best friend.” The text above Shadow Kermit would read: “Fuck friendship, spill the paint.” And Kermit, as my craving was at the time, is the brightest green. If anything had happened to the farm cardigan that day, I would have felt personally responsible.

Navigating envy was much easier in the pre-digital world of my childhood and adolescence. By the time I became a mother at 24, my peers were building their careers and taking life by the horns, which caused me to leave Facebook as quickly as I joined. It was just easier not to see the panoply of parties, promotions, and vacations I missed while I stayed home to change diapers. Filtered through the lens of my hormonal perspective as a sleep-deprived new mother, I knew I would have found it too much to bear to see things I wanted for myself, but, in that moment, I had no means of having; too hard not to feel some kind of longing that would have left me breathless if I had stayed online and watched all of this.

The eye icon on my Instagram Stories records a view count every time I post, a reminder of how the emergence of social media has added a real-time vector to our culture of hyperconsciousness. We are more aware than ever of seeing and being seen. Our eyes are drawn to announcements, vacation snaps and successes like magpies drawn to shiny things. Thus, not only do we bear witness to the lives of those with whom we physically interact, but we are now able to take a figurative look at the lives of those we have never met.

When I left Facebook as a new mother, I told people it was because I was a private person. I’m too introverted. I don’t have time, with the baby and all. I couldn’t tell it was because logging on made me nauseous with envy. Jungian analyst Gail Collins-Webb tells me that “envy is one of the most difficult emotions to address in analysis because it is closely associated with the emotion of shame, and shame goes to the heart of human suffering”. She suggests that when we experience envy, we should lean on her and allow her to instruct us: “Define what you are envious of. That tells you something. For example, an introverted person may be very jealous of an extrovert’s ability to have lots of friends and network in ways that they simply aren’t capable of. When you feel envy towards someone, what you are doing is projecting onto that person that they have this wonderful thing that you want. And that’s worth asking, isn’t it?

Recently a close friend achieved something that I consider one of my personal goals. She is talented and hardworking and deserves her success. For this reason, I find it easy to be happy for her without envy. “Mashallah, I’m so happy for you,” I said when she broke her happy news to me, knowing that I too would love to achieve something like this one day. A while ago, however, another friend realized something that I hadn’t yet, that I didn’t even have on my radar, and while I was congratulating them, something about it bothered me. . I had to admit that in the symphony of emotions I was experiencing, envy was the base note. I had never looked upon this friend with envy before, but this particular realization stirred up negative feelings. Collins-Webb tells me, “If you can follow your urge, it can tell you what you want and it also tells you what your shadow is because you cast it.”

When she says “shadow”, she refers to the darker aspects of our personality, which Carl Jung defined as our “shadow selves”. He explains in his 1951 book, Aion, that “to become aware of [the shadow]…involves recognizing dark aspects of personality as present and real. This act is the essential condition of any form of self-knowledge. “Shadow work”, therefore, is about recognizing and learning from the unconscious and the darker aspects of ourselves that we usually ignore and repress. It’s about figuring out where they’re coming from, because sitting with those feelings can teach us something about what we desire or what we want to change in our own lives.

When I questioned my desire, I was able to trace it back to desire and a feeling of injustice. I could recognize that the opportunity this friend had was the result of privilege and nepotism, so the feelings of envy began to dissipate. I also learned that I wanted something like my friend had for me, and not because they had it, but because I really wanted it. Following my craving, then, led me to a desire I didn’t know I had and as a result, I set to work to achieve what I wanted.

Dr. Sabinah Janally, clinical psychologist, says, “Words have the power to crush or transform sense of self and perceived reality. I don’t feel envy very often, but I realize that a lot of that comes from not avoiding it. For me, saying “mashallah” does not negate envy, it acknowledges that envy may well be present alongside acclaim and if I find it sitting alongside my praise and admiration, I encourage my look to turn inward to see what it can try to show me.

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Carlisle man uploaded thousands of child abuse images http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/carlisle-man-uploaded-thousands-of-child-abuse-images/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 11:37:00 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/carlisle-man-uploaded-thousands-of-child-abuse-images/ A CARLISLE man recently diagnosed with a mental health condition has been placed on the sex offender registry after admitting charges related to uploading thousands of child abuse images. At Carlisle Crown Court, Oliver Owen, 25, pleaded guilty to six offences, all involving indecent imagery. The defendant, of Bowman Street, Carlisle, admitted the following charges: […]]]>

A CARLISLE man recently diagnosed with a mental health condition has been placed on the sex offender registry after admitting charges related to uploading thousands of child abuse images.

At Carlisle Crown Court, Oliver Owen, 25, pleaded guilty to six offences, all involving indecent imagery. The defendant, of Bowman Street, Carlisle, admitted the following charges:

· That on September 7, 2020, he distributed indecent images of category C children.

· That between March 17, 2019 and October 23, 2020, he uploaded 1,081 images of indecent children, classified as category A, the most serious.

A similar offence, involving 640 Category B child abuse images.

· And another similar offence, involving 3,958 indecent images of Category C children.

· Own 240 forbidden images of children.

· And possessing extreme pornography that was “grossly offensive” and featured animals.

No details of the offense were revealed when Owen appeared at Carlisle Crown Court, but his solicitor, Judith McCullough, confirmed he had recently been diagnosed with Asperger’s Syndrome.

“It is something that can have an impact, both in terms of offenses and, ultimately, in terms of the resolution of this case,” the lawyer said.

She asked that background reports be prepared before sentencing, including that of a “prominent” psychologist.

Miss McCullough added: ‘The defendant himself has taken steps to seek help and it is clear that these proceedings are weighing heavily on him.’

She said Owen, whose family was in court to support him, understood that his sentence should include “the most favorable package available to the court”.

Recorder Ian Unsworth QC told the defendant, of Bowman Street, Carlisle, he must co-operate with those preparing the reports, noting it was essential the psychologist assessed him before sentencing.

The judge also noted that it was important for the court to have “all sentencing options” available to it.

Adjourning the case until August 26, Recorder Unsworth told Owen that his name would now be placed on the sex offender registry. How long he stays there will depend on his ultimate sentence.

The Recorder granted bail to the accused until his sentence is heard.

The Lucy Faithful Foundation is dedicated to the prevention of child sexual abuse and operates a hotline for those who fear being drawn into abuse-related offenses or who know someone else who may be at risk.

The charity runs the Stop It Now! helpline, an anonymous and confidential service available to anyone concerned about child sexual abuse, including:

* adults concerned about the behavior of other adults or children and young people

* those concerned about their own sexual thoughts or behaviors towards children, including * those concerned about their behavior online

* friends and relatives of people arrested for sexual offenses, including on the Internet

* any other adult concerned about child sexual abuse – including survivors and professionals.

The helpline number is 0808 1000 900.

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National Academy of Sports Medicine® and Athletics and Fitness Association of America Offer Free Access to Award-Winning Fitness and Wellness Conference http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/national-academy-of-sports-medicine-and-athletics-and-fitness-association-of-america-offer-free-access-to-award-winning-fitness-and-wellness-conference/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 00:06:49 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/national-academy-of-sports-medicine-and-athletics-and-fitness-association-of-america-offer-free-access-to-award-winning-fitness-and-wellness-conference/ Health psychologist and author Kelly McGonigal will speak at the eighth edition Optima Conference October 13-15 GILBERT, Ariz., June 22, 2022–(BUSINESS WIRE)–National Academy of Sports Medicine (NASM) and the American Athletic and Fitness Association (AFAA)the world leaders in fitness certifications, will host the eighth annual Optima Conference virtually from October 13-15, 2022. Registered attendees will […]]]>

Health psychologist and author Kelly McGonigal will speak at the eighth edition Optima Conference October 13-15

GILBERT, Ariz., June 22, 2022–(BUSINESS WIRE)–National Academy of Sports Medicine (NASM) and the American Athletic and Fitness Association (AFAA)the world leaders in fitness certifications, will host the eighth annual Optima Conference virtually from October 13-15, 2022. Registered attendees will receive complimentary access to over 100 educational sessions, workouts and networking events, including a keynote speech. opening by health psychologist and international bestselling author Kelly McGonigal, PhD.

“We are so excited to have Kelly join us for Optima, as she brings transformational insights into the physical and mental benefits of exercise,” said Laurie McCartney, President of Fitness and Wellness Brands at Ascend Learning, including NASM and AFAA. “By making this event a free event for the second year in a row, we are able to give as many audiences as possible access to the latest and most groundbreaking developments in the industry.”

The three-day virtual event will include sessions on a variety of health and fitness topics, a virtual showroom featuring new vendors, and enhanced group fitness experiences.

Keynote speaker McGonigal is best known for her TED Talk, “How to Make Stress Your Friend,” which is one of the top 20 most-watched TED Talks of all time, with over 23 million views. She is also the author of several books including The Willpower Instinct, The Upside of Stress and The Joy of Movement.

Optima received a Gold Stevie International Business Award for “Best Educational Conference”, making it one of the best events for members of the health and wellness industry. Last year the conference welcomed over 10,000 attendees from all facets of the fitness industry, including personal trainers, wellness coaches, athletes, massage therapists and health club managers. .

However, the Full Access Pass is free with registration; attendees will also have the option of purchasing the Full Access Pass with Continuing Education Units (CEUs) which allows attendees to earn credit towards recertification requirements based on attendance and participation while throughout the conference.

For more information and to register, visit www.nasm.org/optima-2022.

For more information on NASM, visit nasm.org. To learn more about AFAA, visit afaa.com.

About NASM: The National Academy of Sports Medicine (NASM) is a global leader in fitness and wellness certifications and learning tools. Drawing on more than 35 years of expertise, NASM programs create a roadmap for fitness professionals to help their clients achieve better physical and mental performance in athletics and in everyday life. NASM provides an industry-unique training system, with the Optimum Performance Training (OPT™) model, creating robust courses and content based solely on scientific research. NASM has been the choice of over 1.4 million fitness professionals in over 100 countries, creating a global space for optimal wellness and fitness. To learn more about NASM, visit nasm.org or call 1.800.460.6276. For industry news and insights, follow on Facebook or Twitter at @NASM.

About AFAA: Since 1983, the Athletics and Fitness Association of America (AFAA) has issued more than 350,000 certifications in 100 countries, providing generations with the practical skills, science and practical experience needed for group leaders and trainers effective motivate and inspire others to move towards healthier and happier lives. To learn more about AFAA, visit afaa.com or call 1.800.446.AFAA. For industry news and information, follow us on Facebook or Twitter at @AFAA_fit.

See the source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20220621006074/en/

contacts

Jamie Killin
Thundering PR for NASM
jkillin@uproarpr.com
480-710-5270

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QPS accused of ‘discrimination’ against rookie with ADHD http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/qps-accused-of-discrimination-against-rookie-with-adhd/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 01:05:02 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/qps-accused-of-discrimination-against-rookie-with-adhd/ He said the QPS still classifies ADHD as a mental illness, in the same category as schizophrenia, although medical professionals classify ADHD as a neurodevelopmental disorder. He said these policies were outdated and strongly reinforced the stigma in the community about ADHD. “The other day they had cops at my daughter’s school… How am I […]]]>

He said the QPS still classifies ADHD as a mental illness, in the same category as schizophrenia, although medical professionals classify ADHD as a neurodevelopmental disorder.

He said these policies were outdated and strongly reinforced the stigma in the community about ADHD.

“The other day they had cops at my daughter’s school… How am I supposed to tell her that she can never be one of them because they just discriminate against you? That you’re not good enough for this,” Frost said.

“There’s absolutely no reason why I can’t perform the duties of a cop.

“I went to see two different doctors, my ADHD psychologist, and the other is a GP, and they both wrote official letters saying there’s absolutely no reason for this to affect my placement. as a cop.”

Frost paid over $2,000 in the process and several hundred dollars for appealing to QPS and Sonic Health Plus, the testing company used by QPS.

“It makes me physically sick to think that if one of my two children is diagnosed with ADHD in their lifetime, I will have to sit them down and explain to them that they are not good enough for certain careers…”

Nicholas Frost

He also wrote several letters, including to Police Commissioner Katarina Carroll, where he detailed how he wanted to join after seeing the QPS. You are made for this campaign, because he said it underlined how much personal experiences make you a perfect officer. He said he had received no responses.

“There are all these cops who don’t understand because when they were growing up people with ADHD were crazy, that’s how they saw it,” he said.

“All of these opinions and guidelines that they have written off are misinformed and incorrect.

“Review ADHD policy. I’m not saying let everyone in, I’m just saying review on a case-by-case basis.

Frost launched an online petition, which by Friday afternoon garnered more than 2,000 signatures, calling on QPS to review the guidelines.

He said he has since heard of several police officers with ADHD, both in Queensland and overseas, who are currently serving and taking the same drug.

A QPS spokeswoman said that as of June 10, the medical standards had been approved after being independently reviewed and updated to ensure best practice, were evidence-based and aligned with the roles required for the police and to meet police and community expectations.

“To determine its ability to fulfill the true professional requirements of the police, candidates diagnosed with a type of attention deficit/predominantly inattentive hyperactivity disorder (formerly known as attention deficit disorder) will be assessed at on a case-by-case basis, with a final decision based on the person’s history, symptoms, treatment and future prognosis,” the spokesperson said.

“Medical standards state that the applicant must obtain a full report from a psychiatrist
or psychologist specializing in that specific disorder detailing the nature and severity of the disorder,
as well as information about any treatment (eg, medication, therapy) and side effects.

“The use of amphetamine-based drugs is of particular concern. This report is then assessed to determine if the person’s diagnosis could potentially lead to impairment of executive functions essential to the maintenance of operational order, including training in the use of firearms.

The spokeswoman said ADHD was not compared to other medical diagnoses such as schizophrenia and that due to confidentiality rules, the SPQ was unable to disclose the medical conditions of its members current.

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Vancouver Psychologist’s Patient Disappears – Winnipeg Free Press http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/vancouver-psychologists-patient-disappears-winnipeg-free-press/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 07:00:08 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/vancouver-psychologists-patient-disappears-winnipeg-free-press/ Vancouver psychologist Dr. Annick Boudreau is convinced that her patient Danielle did not commit suicide. All the evidence is to the contrary: the suicide note, all the pills, the disappearance certificate. Danielle had improved greatly and had hinted during their last session that there was a man in her life and that she might be […]]]>



Vancouver psychologist Dr. Annick Boudreau is convinced that her patient Danielle did not commit suicide. All the evidence is to the contrary: the suicide note, all the pills, the disappearance certificate.

Danielle had improved greatly and had hinted during their last session that there was a man in her life and that she might be coming out of her depression. Boudreau has never lost a patient, and she’s not about to admit that she may have missed the signs with Danielle.


Midday dark

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dark noon

The police decide to commit suicide after checking a few boxes. The police are despicable but nearly invisible here, with Boudreau assuming they hate them for proving another client wasn’t a slam-dunk murderer in his previous book, Primary obsessions.

Not very nuanced, but that’s what author Charles Demers gives us.

It’s amateur detective time – what could go wrong?

Danielle is — was? — a comedian who was hired to soften the image of a charismatic challenged labor leader from impoverished east Vancouver running for mayor on a left/green platform.

The candidate promised to ban trucks on Knight Street, a very long real street in Vancouver and the main truck route from the port. Wealthy developers cartwheeled at the prospect of ramshackle properties on Knight St. bursting all over bike lanes.

Shit if he didn’t win the mayoral election… then immediately flip-flopped to ban the trucks, just as Danielle disappeared.

Could she have had more than a professional relationship with the mayor? Could the bikers who allegedly control the port have threatened the mayor to keep the truck route? Could Danielle’s unknown fate be a message to her adoration? Could Annick, like in her first book, sometimes jump to the wrong conclusions and do some rather stupid and dangerous things while dancing on the edge of patient confidentiality and her clinical role?

Annick is quite friendly, her shortcomings aside. Through dark noonVancouver is a pretty sleazy place with a huge gap between rich and poor – and that’s even without the book paying much attention to the opioid crisis and the exploitation of women.

Annick’s romantic partner, Phillip, is a science reporter for the CBC, but in his youth he tangled with Asian gangs and still hangs out with friends who may not have cut those ties.

Danielle’s father, Ivor, is a crusty old journalist who moved from far left to far right over the course of his career.

Ivor is beaten for asking about his missing daughter. Annick and Phillip are being chased all over Vancouver. The police yawn.

Then, suddenly, the book is over. Don’t bother to ask, no spoilers here.

The problem with the book is that it’s barely a book. A longer story, perhaps. As Primary obsessionsit wraps up the story very quickly, after only over 200 pages, and then you get into the acknowledgments and author biography and other stuffing.

Unless you’re Louise Penny, it’s unusual to find a Canadian mystery hitting 300 pages these days, and many come closer to 200 pages than 300.

You can pass through dark noon in one evening, such is the decided absence of character and plot development.

Author Charles Demers is a comedian — he’s on CBC radio on The debaters — a writer, an actor, a political activist, an essayist.

He has the beginnings of a decent Canadian character – does he still have 100 pages of solid writing left in him?

Retired Free Press reporter Nick Martin remembers the brief newsroom fad of limiting stories to eight inches. He still gets grumpy about it.


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I’m a child psychologist – the three-step guide to helping your kids through divorce and how to have THAT conversation http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/im-a-child-psychologist-the-three-step-guide-to-helping-your-kids-through-divorce-and-how-to-have-that-conversation/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 08:37:26 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/im-a-child-psychologist-the-three-step-guide-to-helping-your-kids-through-divorce-and-how-to-have-that-conversation/ It is arguably one of the hardest things a person can go through – as a parent or as a child. But if you’ve separated from your partner and are considering a divorce, there are some key steps you can take to make the process easier for your children. 2 It’s important to avoid conflict […]]]>

It is arguably one of the hardest things a person can go through – as a parent or as a child.

But if you’ve separated from your partner and are considering a divorce, there are some key steps you can take to make the process easier for your children.

2

It’s important to avoid conflict around your children during a divorce, says child psychologist Vincent PapaleoCredit: Getty

Child psychologist Vincent Papaleo spoke to Maggie Dent on the latest episode of his Ask Me Anything podcast about the impact of divorce on children and the things he has learned throughout his career that can help people going through a marriage separation.

“A nine-year-old girl said to me, ‘My mom and dad don’t understand. I’m half my mom and half my dad and when they fight I feel like the two halves of who I am are in conflict and I can’t feel whole,” he began. .

“The enormity of this statement is breathtaking.

“And that’s so true. I’ve shared this anecdote with so many young people I’ve seen and they say, ‘That’s exactly how I feel, I feel like the person I am is broken and divided” – and that’s what we want to avoid.”

I am an expert on children - why
I'm a psychologist, there are three easy ways to tell if you're boring

It boils down to one main factor – limiting the “level of conflict between parents and children’s exposure to that conflict”.

And inside of that are three key points that Papaleo has come to know as common issues children suffer from during their parents’ divorce.

First, “they don’t want to hear their parents’ story.”

Second, “they don’t want to carry messages between their parents or be responsible for their parents’ communication.”

And finally, that “they don’t want to hear their parents or loved ones speak ill of their parents”.

“A lot of kids I see say their parents are constantly confusing them, constantly telling their contradictory stories, talking negatively and badly about each other,” he explained.

“And for children, it creates unreasonable tension and conflict.

“The overwhelming social science research is that the only predictor of a child’s post-separation level of adjustment is the level of conflict and their exposure to that conflict by their parents.

“So it’s our job to protect them and in my world I think one of the best indicators of parental confidence is the parent’s ability to think about their child’s needs and have a good relationship with the other. relative.

“Make decisions through your children’s eyes – do what’s best for them.”

For many people, talking with their children about their divorce is an incredibly difficult hurdle to overcome.

But Papaleo also had advice on how to handle that as well.

“Trying to choose the right words can seem extremely difficult,” he said.

“According to the age of the children, I observe that you want to say a little less, not a little more.

“Don’t give complicated, detailed and lengthy stories and dialogues about why you’re breaking up – instead give factual – ‘Mom and I, Dad and I had a hard time, you can see we didn’t have on , we have not been friends, we have decided not to live together anymore and we are going to separate.

“Firm, direct and precise.

“No ‘we want to remind you how much we love you and you’ll be fine’, because that gets lost in the narrative.

“It’s still an important conversation to have, but in this first installment, it’s so important to have less information that the kids can take away from the main message.”

And keep an eye out for some warning signs if you’re worried your child isn’t adjusting well to your divorce.

“Elementary-aged children often display quite transparent behavior that they don’t adapt to, and it’s usually seen quite easily by the people around them,” he said.

“Teenagers are a more complicated group, especially when it comes to loyalty – their understanding of separation and its circumstances is quite different.

“They can think about thinking, they can imagine how other people are feeling, they can have a view of their parents’ behavior and they will have a judgment about it.

I have 34JJ boobs and spent years buying bikinis that fit
Our neighbor built an extension touching our house - now we have to pay him £130,000

“What we don’t want is that we don’t want children who are faced with conflict and who, in response, run away to their peer group.

“And depending on how their peer group works, that can be really supportive or it can actually expose them to some pretty big problems.”

Papaleo also advised to be

2

Papaleo also advised being “firm and direct” when telling your children about your divorce – to make sure the “main message” gets to them.Credit: Getty
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Using psychology instead of fear to market safe travel http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/using-psychology-instead-of-fear-to-market-safe-travel/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 09:04:08 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/using-psychology-instead-of-fear-to-market-safe-travel/ Inspiring people to do what’s best for themselves and the community is never easy. We wish that was the case. But human beings are messy and complex organisms. Unlike the computer-generated algorithms that permeate our lives, we are not made up of programmable bits and bytes. This is why there have been so many attempts […]]]>

Inspiring people to do what’s best for themselves and the community is never easy. We wish that was the case. But human beings are messy and complex organisms. Unlike the computer-generated algorithms that permeate our lives, we are not made up of programmable bits and bytes.

This is why there have been so many attempts – and so many failures – to encourage people to behave well. Just look at recent vaccination and masking efforts.

Some attempts use fear to inspire behavior, but the effectiveness of the approach is questionable at best. On the other hand, positive messages have been shown to convince people to avoid certain activities.

GeoSure chooses positivity, safety and trust over apprehension and danger. This is something we have considered since the inception of GeoSure. As a data-driven startup that uses artificial intelligence and machine learning, GeoSure generates real-time safety data for over 65,000 neighborhoods around the world.

The safety scores — which cover eight categories, including metrics for women, LGBTQ+, and nightlife — could easily be marketed from a fear-mongering standpoint. But from the start, we wanted to flip the model upside down.

We choose hope, not panic. We choose to give people accurate data that empowers them and the wider community to make smarter decisions.

We sell to large corporations — and federal, state, and local agencies, including tourist boards — based on the empowerment, assurance, and emotional and physical well-being our data provides. The experience was intentionally designed for the end user. It’s different too.

There is solid evolutionary science behind our approach. After all, if we are well-meaning but scientifically irrelevant, we will not succeed in our mission.

GeoSure understands that human beings are information processing organisms. Humans have evolved with the ability to quickly identify and evaluate information that determines whether they will survive or perish, whether it is the sound of a woolly mammoth or the smell of deadly mushrooms. We no longer live in a thriving or dying environment, but our biological heritage still responds as if we do.

For these entrenched reasons, not positioning GeoSure to deeply appeal to our fear instincts may seem counter-intuitive. After all, there’s a reason the local news mantra has long been “if it bleeds, it leads.” Peril captures attention.

But let’s go a little further. In treacherous situations – whether the threat in our immediate environment comes in the form of a pachyderm or data from a digital platform – we are programmed to react in one of three ways: fight, flee or freeze. .

But if you want to know if it’s safe to go to a local restaurant at 9 p.m. in an unfamiliar city, the three “Fs” won’t help you. What will help is the reassuring, authoritative and trust-building experience that GeoSure offers. This emotional context is just as aligned with our evolved brains as waving the flag of fear.

In fact, we are programmed to both avoid danger and seek out opportunity, which GeoSure makes possible. Opportunity is linked to the pleasure and reward centers in the brain. GeoSure can reach those with its message about the adventure that motivated you to take this journey. Are you making the trip to minimize the danger? Or to maximize positive experiences while feeling empowered and safe? GeoSure thinks it’s the latter.

Additionally, GeoSure encourages people to contribute to community safety. Many studies show that people derive pleasure from betting on the common good.

In short, we are replacing the short-term marketing of fear with the long-term promise of well-being. Fear is toxic, the anxiety it causes leads to emotional and physiological damage, including the release of cortisol which triggers inflammation. In contrast, positivity associated with GeoSure will generate what is known as “chronic positivity”. Aren’t employees and customers more composed, constructive, better decision makers in a confident state of mind than when they are bothered and uncomfortable?

The arc of positivity extends from GeoSure to all members of our network – the companies that offer our platform to employees and customers in partner cities, local tourist boards and, of course, end users.

In a way, it boils down to a cognitive bias called the “availability heuristic”: whatever is familiar or comes easily to mind is assumed to be common or typical. So when we are bombarded with negative information about something, we think something is negative. If we are instead presented with positive information, we will think of that something positively. Which would you rather live?

It is so simple and profound.

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Will hearing loss soon be commonplace? http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/will-hearing-loss-soon-be-commonplace/ Sun, 12 Jun 2022 17:23:10 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/will-hearing-loss-soon-be-commonplace/ Can you imagine a time when hearing loss would be commonplace? When would it be more prevalent than not in a social setting? When would this be the new normal? Given demographic trends, we may be fast approaching such a time. This is due to three important factors – (1) the median age of the […]]]>

Can you imagine a time when hearing loss would be commonplace? When would it be more prevalent than not in a social setting? When would this be the new normal? Given demographic trends, we may be fast approaching such a time. This is due to three important factors – (1) the median age of the US population is increasing, (2) people are living longer, and (3) the higher incidence of hearing loss among older adults.

Source: Ollyy/Shutterstock

Hearing healthcare will be increasingly important

In the report of the National Academies of Sciences Hearing care for adultsthe authors use demographics to demonstrate the growing impact that hearing health care will have from a social policy perspective.

According to the report, in 1900, 4.1% of the American population was 65 or older, which is just over 3 million people; in 2012, 13.7% of the population, or 40 million people, were 65 or older, and by 2060, 24% of the US population is expected to be 65 or older. These trends are similar in other developed countries of the world.

Combined with people living longer and higher incidence rates of hearing loss in older adults, we may be approaching a time when hearing loss is the new normal in adults. Higher rates of noise pollution and ubiquitous use of headphones may also make hearing loss more common in other age groups, although this may be offset by better regulated noise levels in work environments. .

The increase in the prevalence of hearing loss has some silver linings

The trends are frightening, but the good news for those of us with hearing loss is that as hearing loss becomes more ‘normal’, social change is inevitable. I can imagine several positive developments.

1. Stigma reduction. When something is mundane, the stigma recedes. This would be great news for people living with hearing loss and could push them to seek treatment sooner. Currently, people wait an average of seven to ten years before asking for help.

2. Cheaper and more widespread access to hearing solutions. This is already happening as companies prepare for a new FDA category of over-the-counter hearing aids for people with mild to moderate hearing loss. With increased demand and new competitors entering the market, innovation and lower prices are likely.

3. Trendier hearing aids. When everyone has one, individuality will become more important, making hearing aids fair game for fashion. It’s gonna be fun.

4. Quieter spaces. Wouldn’t that be wonderful! Restaurants could start turning down the music to attract older customers. Movies and other theaters can also start turning the volume down while dialing down the clarity of the sound.

5. Better hearing assistance everywhere. Closed captioning, looping and other assistive technologies may soon become the norm. Perhaps the captioning of live TV programs would also improve. As demand grows, new forms of hearing aids for public spaces will likely result.

6. More regular screening by physicians. Changing demographics are expected to lead to changes in the medical profession. Since earlier detection and treatment of hearing loss could help reduce associated health problems such as depression, an increased risk of falls and a higher likelihood of dementia, we could see hearing screenings become a standard part of an annual physical exam.

7. Clearer speech patterns. With more hearing-impaired people, careful enunciation and diction may once again become the typical speech pattern. It would definitely make things easier to hear!

8. Increased emphasis on auditory research. This can only be good news. The more scientists learn about how hearing works (and doesn’t), the more successful they will be in developing new cures and better ways to prevent hearing loss.

Copyright: Living with hearing loss/Shari Eberts. Reprinted with permission.

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I’m a Psychologist and These 5 Easy Steps Stop a Sugar Craving in its Tracks http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/im-a-psychologist-and-these-5-easy-steps-stop-a-sugar-craving-in-its-tracks/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 07:45:00 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/im-a-psychologist-and-these-5-easy-steps-stop-a-sugar-craving-in-its-tracks/ WHEN cravings strike, we have to decide whether to give in to that donut or find an escape. A psychologist has revealed a seven-step process that helps get rid of cravings. 1 Food cravings make you want to eat sweet stuff from the barrelCredit: Getty – Contributor A food craving is a sudden, intense urge […]]]>

WHEN cravings strike, we have to decide whether to give in to that donut or find an escape.

A psychologist has revealed a seven-step process that helps get rid of cravings.

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Food cravings make you want to eat sweet stuff from the barrelCredit: Getty – Contributor

A food craving is a sudden, intense urge to eat something specific, often sweet but possibly salty.

Unlike true hunger, which gives us physical queues, a craving is a desire for a reward or a dopamine hit.

Dr. Meg Arroll, Registered Psychologist at Wellness Brand Lifetimetold The Sun that while the cravings are overwhelming, they usually only last about three minutes.

This means you can nip it in the bud quickly and then get on with your day.

“Distracting your attention from a craving for that short amount of time can really help the craving pass – so think about activities you can do that last three minutes,” Dr Meg said.

“Maybe belting out your favorite ballad, or you’re at work clutching a stress ball in your hand.

“Square jumping jacks can also help and offer the double whammy of a short exercise period.

“A three-minute progressive muscle relaxation exercise in which you tense and relax each muscle group starting with your toes and working steadily towards your face is also a great way to distract and relax your mind and body.”

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If you find that a little dancing or breathing exercise isn’t enough to banish thoughts of chocolate or chips, Dr. Meg has offered a more scientific alternative.

It is a form of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), a form of therapy that aims to understand how thoughts, feelings, and behaviors are intertwined.

Dr Meg said ‘we can change one of them to impact the others’.

“When it comes to food cravings, a helpful concept of CBT is ‘frustration intolerance,'” Dr. Meg said.

“[This is] how low the bar is (made up of thoughts and feelings) before giving in to the urge to eat (the behavior).

“While distraction is a good way to manage cravings because many different situations trigger cravings, you can also use this element of CBT to build a higher level of tolerance.”

The seven steps below form the internal remote control exercise.

1.When a craving for food or drink arises, press the pause button on your personal remote and stop in your tracks.

2. Now, while your body is in this freeze frame, use your mind’s eye to watch yourself give in to the urge.

This can include the brief gratification you usually feel after consuming a snack – be honest without yourself about how the scene normally goes.

3. Next, breathe deeply through your diaphragm for a few moments and fast forward this scene until after you gave in to the urge (for example, an hour later).

Now ask yourself: how do you feel? Are you disappointed that you folded?

The unpleasant feelings of guilt, shame and self-recrimination that normally accompany eating behavior may seem quite strong now, but try not to push these feelings away because they will help you.

4. Now that you’ve seen the future, press “rewind” on your remote and take yourself back to the present, only this time watch the scene unfold again where you don’t give in to urge.

Here you understand that you are not physically hungry and therefore do not have need food or drink – craving is just another thought that can be pushed out of your sight.

You are in control of your actions and can choose to make a decision that promotes your health.

Now ask yourself: how do you feel? Strong, in control and dominating those cravings Yes!

5. Finally, with this increased confidence and autonomy, press play and your remote and take your pick of what you want to do.

You have the ability to change your behavior and develop healthy lifestyle habits.

How to Prevent Food Cravings All Together

If you often find yourself experiencing food cravings, how can you get them to move more permanently?

Nutritionists at Anutr explain that preventing food cravings almost always comes down to balancing your meals and snacks.v

Every time you eat, make sure you’re getting “fiber, a source of protein and healthy unsaturated fats,” says Charlotte Lily Thompson, Associate Registered Nutritionist.

Keeping it low in sugar and salt is a bonus.

For example, his favorite snacks include a 30g serving of nuts and a handful of fresh berries; hummus and raw vegetables; apple slices and nut butter or a cooked oat bar.

A balanced meal or snack “helps you maintain consistent blood sugar levels throughout the day and feel full longer,” Charlotte says.

Charlotte added: “Also keep a bottle of water with you at all times.

“Often thirst can be mistaken for hunger, so if you’re hungry after eating recently, drink a glass of water and wait ten minutes – then, if you’re still hungry, it’s time for a snack. .”

Emma Moross, Registered Nutritionist, said: “If you find you’re suddenly hungry in the evening and want to eat everything from the cupboard, chances are you haven’t eaten well all day!

“Aim for three balanced meals a day that contain whole carbs (like brown rice, quinoa, or oats), healthy fats (like olive oil and avocado), and a source of lean protein (like fish, chicken or tofu).”

Sometimes food cravings — which are common throughout pregnancy — are “a red flag for certain health issues,” Emma said.

“For example, if you crave ice cream, that may be a symptom of anemia caused by iron deficiency,” she said.

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“Excessive sugar or carb cravings can be a sign that your blood sugar is out of balance – some sugar cravings are normal, though.

“If you have any cravings that concern you, always talk to your doctor.”

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