Psychologist – Populer Psikoloji http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/ Wed, 12 Jan 2022 22:50:39 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-01T204530.168-150x150.png Psychologist – Populer Psikoloji http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/ 32 32 A Parenting Psychologist Shares Five Simple Steps Parents Should Take for Their Family’s Mental Health http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/a-parenting-psychologist-shares-five-simple-steps-parents-should-take-for-their-familys-mental-health/ Wed, 12 Jan 2022 21:47:30 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/a-parenting-psychologist-shares-five-simple-steps-parents-should-take-for-their-familys-mental-health/ Renowned Parent Psychologist, Reena B. Patel is passionate about educating parents on the simple steps that can be taken to relieve some of that stress or anxiety. In fact, she says it’s about parenting differently in 2022. Reena has five simple steps parents should take for their family’s mental health and to have a happier […]]]>

Renowned Parent Psychologist, Reena B. Patel is passionate about educating parents on the simple steps that can be taken to relieve some of that stress or anxiety. In fact, she says it’s about parenting differently in 2022.

Reena has five simple steps parents should take for their family’s mental health and to have a happier family life as parents continue to navigate this ongoing pandemic.

Here they are:

  1. Be more flexible; Create an atmosphere of flexibility. Ex: creating situations like a “fire drill” – Stop, drop and change what you are doing helps teach children to be resilient when it comes to change. .
  2. Don’t overwhelm yourself or your children; Keep your days simple. Do one thing a day. Create a to-do and to-do list.
  3. Teaching gratitude at any age: Start a gratitude game! – create a concrete happiness list – use the words I see, hear, feel when you make the list with the kids. Ex: I see the beautiful blue sky today and it makes me smile.
  4. Relying on social media to gather information. Active versus passive screen time!
  5. Mom and Dad Divide and Conquer: Know your role and delegate as needed – it’s okay for dad to do things differently than mom as long as you’re consistent.

Reena joined ‘the four’ LIVE to chat. Watch the interview above.

To learn more, Click here.

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This psychologist helps international students overcome their psychological barriers http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/this-psychologist-helps-international-students-overcome-their-psychological-barriers/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 01:02:03 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/this-psychologist-helps-international-students-overcome-their-psychological-barriers/ Vivi Hua grew up in a family that emphasized traditional Chinese values: being as wealthy, smart, and accomplished as possible. There was a lot of pressure and psychological barriers – her education in Taiwan would later lead her to choose “the best school and” the best college “over her passion. She ended up enrolling in […]]]>

Vivi Hua grew up in a family that emphasized traditional Chinese values: being as wealthy, smart, and accomplished as possible. There was a lot of pressure and psychological barriers – her education in Taiwan would later lead her to choose “the best school and” the best college “over her passion.

She ended up enrolling in a sociology program. It was then that she saw that she appreciated the practical elements of learning and discovered that psychology would be a better fit instead.

Hua would then become a research assistant at a Taipei hospital, where she studied and worked alongside the head of the child and adolescent psychiatry department.

“After gaining clinical experience, I was able to apply for a degree in psychology at a graduate school,” she said. “I enrolled at Yeshiva University, a fairly well-known Jewish university in the New York metro area. “

Today, she uses the diploma to help those who face the same pressures and psychological barriers as she does. We caught up with her to find out more about her journey from international student to altruistic psychologist below:

Were your psychological barriers the main reason you wanted to pursue studies in this field?

I started with my undergraduate degree in sociology at National Taiwan University. Back then, the emphasis was on going to the best school and then the best university. So, it wasn’t very clear to me exactly what my interest was.

During my undergraduate studies (closer to graduation), I saw myself as a more practical person. Sociology is very theoretical so I started taking psychology lessons and it went a lot better.

As English is always preferred for students to obtain their psychology licenses, I had to build some references. This led me to work as a research assistant in a hospital in Taipei (capital of Taiwan). There, I conducted studies and worked alongside the head of the child and adolescent psychiatry department.

After gaining clinical experience, I was then able to apply for a degree in psychology at a doctoral school. I enrolled at Yeshiva University – a fairly well-known Jewish university in the New York metro area.

“This was primarily the program I enrolled in, which was a direct doctoral stream that was accredited and certified by the American Psychological Association,” she says of choosing Yeshiva University in the United States. Source: David Dee Delgado / AFP

What made you decide to study at Yeshiva University and in the United States?

This was primarily the program I enrolled in, which was a direct doctoral path that was accredited and certified by the American Psychological Association. As for the United States, at the time (not sure at the moment), it was still the go-to place for clinical psychology.

The country has a very good system of therapeutic and psychological care.

Explain to us the process of obtaining your psychology license in New York.

It’s more about completing your training program, because you need to complete your practical internship. After you graduate from college, you must also complete a year of postgraduate study through hours of supervision.

Meeting licensing requirements means there are a certain number of hours of supervision to complete. For international students, the only difference would be finding an employer for a visa.

How did you help international students in the United States overcome psychological barriers? What are some of the common misconceptions?

With 10 years of practice as an established psychologist, I provide therapy and help individuals overcome psychological barriers. I often meet international students who come to see me at a breaking point – in a state of extreme depression, on the verge of harming themselves or having thoughts of suicide.

It all comes from worrying about failing their classes and being kicked out of school. They insist on this because it’s tied to their student visa, so if they fail in school, they have to leave the country. There is a lot of mental struggle behind this.

These students usually do not contact me directly. Usually their friends, parents or the school psychologist do this. The challenges they face add up and start from the moment they set foot in school.

The biggest psychological barriers facing international students (especially those from Asia) are culture shock and fear of speaking out. In Asia, students are expected to listen out of respect for their teachers.

What is your advice for international students on how to relocate to a school in the United States and oovercome their psychological barriers?

I tell my students to prepare questions in advance so that they can keep pace with the class and their peers. Another thing I encourage is to raise your hand and ask questions to interact outside of the classroom as well.

It is a common situation for my students to live their first time away from home and their families. Not only do they have to learn to be independent, to pay bills, to do household chores, but it also adds to their academic responsibilities.

In addition to cultural and linguistic adjustments, students face emerging challenges in adulthood that result in psychological barriers. My advice to them would be to seek validation of their experience and take the time to develop new skills.

I also tell them to get out of their comfort zone and express themselves more in public. It is important to develop good relationships with peers and faculty to create the ultimate support system and also hone networking skills.

psychological barriers

“I often meet international students who come to me at a breaking point – in a state of extreme depression, on the verge of hurting themselves or having thoughts of suicide,” she says. Source: Samuel Corum / AFP

And you? What would you advise if you could go back in time?

I wish someone like me contacted me at the time. Now, American schools are offering mentoring systems to provide hands-on experience of what to expect in school.

It really benefits students who work with a professional who has been through a path of similar struggles.

What is most important to you: job satisfaction, salary, social life or a work / life balance? Why?

In my training as a psychologist, I had to go through personal therapy. So, coming from a very traditional Asian family, this achievement and this salary were the external pressures described as important.

Gradually, I became more connected with myself in personal needs and wants and I believe that there is much more to life than these external factors. When I went to the best university in Taiwan, I was not very happy.

If nothing is ever enough and your goal is to focus only on the external milestones, how will you find the balance? I encourage students to take a more balanced approach in different important areas of their lives.

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Cognitive psychologist Dr. Amy Moore reveals lessons learned from training 101,000 brains at TEDx West Monroe conference event http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/cognitive-psychologist-dr-amy-moore-reveals-lessons-learned-from-training-101000-brains-at-tedx-west-monroe-conference-event/ Fri, 07 Jan 2022 13:33:00 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/cognitive-psychologist-dr-amy-moore-reveals-lessons-learned-from-training-101000-brains-at-tedx-west-monroe-conference-event/ COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo., January 7, 2022 / PRNewswire / – At an independently hosted TEDx event in West Monroe, Louisiana, cognitive psychologist Dr. Amy lawson moore took the stage to reveal the results of her brain training research. Her speech began with a candid story about her own son struggling to read and spell words, […]]]>

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo., January 7, 2022 / PRNewswire / – At an independently hosted TEDx event in West Monroe, Louisiana, cognitive psychologist Dr. Amy lawson moore took the stage to reveal the results of her brain training research. Her speech began with a candid story about her own son struggling to read and spell words, including his name, at the age of nine. After brain training, her son was accepted into gifted and talented language arts and was subsequently tested in college-level English.

Dr. Moore asks the question: “How is it possible that my son who once struggled to spell his own name could pass two English classes in college with an A at 14?” She reveals that her son received 9 months of one-on-one brain training at LearningRx and similar stories resonate with the global network of brain training centers.

Lessons Learned from Training 101,000 Brains | Dr. Amy lawson moore | TEDxWestMonroe

Brain training, or cognitive training, is a broad term for the repeated engagement of mental tasks that aims to improve cognitive skills such as memory, attention, and visualization. There are “brain games” everywhere, but brain training is more than a game. To harness the brain’s ability to change through experience – a phenomenon called neuroplasticity – brain training must be intense, complex. , targeted, repeated and arguably delivered by a human. The LearningRx team has worked with over 100,000 children and adults in over 6 million brain training sessions.

Since 2015, hundreds of research studies have been published on brain training programs, and Dr. Moore’s name honors more than a dozen. Peer-Reviewed Research on LearningRx Brain Training Methods Demonstrates Complexity, Universality, and Transfer Effects of Human-Provided Brain Training for ADHD, Learning Disabilities, Traumatic Brain Injury and age-related cognitive decline.

Research you can read here: https://www.gibsonresearchinstitute.org/publications/

Dr Moore ends his TEDx talk with a story about a research participant with severe head trauma who has recovered his life and career after brain training. Dr Moore says, “It’s a story of hope with the message that we are not stuck with the cognitive cards that have been given to us!

About LearningRx®
LearningRx is the world’s largest one-on-one brain training company. Their training programs are delivered in more than 200 sites in North America and in 48 countries around the world. LearningRx has helped over 100,000 individuals and families hone their cognitive skills to help them think faster, learn more easily, and perform better. LearningRx’s methods have been used in clinical settings for over 35 years and have been peer reviewed in over a dozen scientific journals. To find out more, visit https://www.learningrx.com

Dr. Amy moore is a cognitive psychologist and brain training researcher in Colorado Springs, CO at the headquarters of LearningRx, the world’s largest network of cognitive training centers. She specializes in the rehabilitation of cognition and learning in neurodevelopmental disorders, brain damage, learning disabilities and age-related cognitive decline. She is also editor-in-chief of the Modern Brain Journal, a board-certified Christian counselor, and co-host of the Brainy Moms podcast. Learn more about his work at www.AmyMoorePhD.com and www.LearningRx.com

Media contact:
Christine perry
7192648808
[email protected]

SOURCE LearningRx TEDx


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NU psychology professor Renee Engeln studies body image and media http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/nu-psychology-professor-renee-engeln-studies-body-image-and-media/ Wed, 05 Jan 2022 04:57:59 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/nu-psychology-professor-renee-engeln-studies-body-image-and-media/ Photo courtesy of Renee Engeln Members of Engeln’s Body and Media Lab (“BAM”) smile for a photo. BAMs are working with Renee Engeln to research issues surrounding women’s body images. Psychology professor Renee Engeln’s Body and Media Lab shows how society’s obsession with beauty hurts women. Engeln’s research explores cultural practices that undermine the relationship […]]]>

Photo courtesy of Renee Engeln

Members of Engeln’s Body and Media Lab (“BAM”) smile for a photo. BAMs are working with Renee Engeln to research issues surrounding women’s body images.

Psychology professor Renee Engeln’s Body and Media Lab shows how society’s obsession with beauty hurts women.

Engeln’s research explores cultural practices that undermine the relationship between women and their bodies. She delves into topics such as negative body speech, feelings about idealized media images, and the adoption of exterior views on physical appearance. According to Engeln, many young women struggle with body image and there is immense pressure to conform to unrealistic and often discriminatory beauty and body ideals.

The lab is researching how to improve fitness experiences for women. He ran a fitness class on Zoom and monitored how exercise affected participants’ mood and body image.

“If you think about how your body looks while you workout, that’s bad news,” Engeln said. “It makes you enjoy your exercise less, it makes you less likely to want to exercise more, it prevents you from getting the body image benefits that exercise usually brings.”

The lab concluded that fitness facilities and instructors should promote exercise with an emphasis on its health and wellness benefits rather than focusing on weight loss or changes in appearance. physical.

Last fall, Engeln and other researchers at the lab wrote an op-ed in the Chicago Tribune about their study, which explained why women’s clothing, like high heels and tight-fitting clothing, is painful and inconvenient for women. carriers. She explained how such clothing correlates with higher “body monitoring,” chronic monitoring of your appearance that can be detrimental to mental health.

Nina Sachs, senior and Weinberg lab worker, said the northwest was a “hotbed” for body comparison and media exposure. She said she appreciates the way the lab’s research explores how women experience and treat their bodies.

“Having information about what this type of exposure can do to us and what we can do to improve (how) we see our bodies and the bodies of others can create an environment that is hopefully less competitive and comparative, ”Sachs said.

Sachs hopes the lab’s research will help cultivate a culture that is more holistic in nature.

Engeln said the current climate is toxic and encourages personal judgment on appearance. She said this is linked to many difficulties that NU students can connect with, such as eating disorders.

“These are not a healthy set of ideals that we are asked to aspire to,” Engeln said. “And it has a real impact on people’s lives. “

Harlym Pike, senior at Weinberg, who also works at the lab, said understanding the psychology behind beauty and body image is important because of their effects on relationships, mental health and other aspects of body image. life.

Pike’s lab work has helped her learn more about body image and its importance, especially among college students, she said.

“It’s important to be aware of these patterns and relationships that exist around this topic to change the outlook… and hopefully bring about a positive change in our society when it comes to body image,” Pike said. .

Pike said work from the Body and Media Lab and other related labs demonstrates the importance of empirically studying the impact of technology and media on body image.

“I want to live in a world where the students in my class can focus on learning and not worry about their hair, makeup or clothes or if they’ve gained or lost weight,” Engeln said. . “For me it is a much healthier environment for all of us.”

E-mail: [email protected]

Twitter: @chiarafkim

Related stories:

Students Navigate Northwest Dinner Culture and ‘Lean Dinner’ With Eating Disorder

NU psychology professor publishes book on negative impacts of beauty standards on women

Psychology professor leads ‘beauty evil’ TED Talk



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New York clinical psychologist to help teens cope with stress http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/new-york-clinical-psychologist-to-help-teens-cope-with-stress/ Mon, 03 Jan 2022 01:12:00 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/new-york-clinical-psychologist-to-help-teens-cope-with-stress/ It’s no secret that people have had mental health issues during the pandemic. For many teens and children, feelings like anxiety and depression can be feelings they don’t know how to communicate. Schenectady’s clinical psychologist Dr Rudy Nydegger says it’s important to try and keep things as normal as possible for teens at a time […]]]>

It’s no secret that people have had mental health issues during the pandemic.

For many teens and children, feelings like anxiety and depression can be feelings they don’t know how to communicate.

Schenectady’s clinical psychologist Dr Rudy Nydegger says it’s important to try and keep things as normal as possible for teens at a time when everything else seems to be changing.

“They don’t know who to talk to or what to do,” Nydegger said. “Parents and friends are a good support system. “

Nydegger says parents should watch for any changes in their child’s behavior and can ask these questions if they notice they are acting differently.

“Are you feeling more nervous than usual?” Are you more worried? Are you isolating yourself? Nydegger has said things that parents can ask of their child.

Nydegger says talking with friends and family can help, but if symptoms of depression and anxiety don’t go away, professional help should be considered.

“You can talk to friends [and] family, but a professional brings knowledge, experience, expertise and perspective; it’s different, ”Nydegger said.

Even though the thought of sharing your feelings with a stranger can be scary, Nydegger recommends trying therapy at least once.

He says many teens like to talk with someone who is neutral and sympathetic.


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Can you really fall in love at first sight? http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/can-you-really-fall-in-love-at-first-sight/ Sat, 01 Jan 2022 16:51:35 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/can-you-really-fall-in-love-at-first-sight/ Some people vividly remember the first time they laid eyes on their partner. Some people describe the sensation as a spark, a feeling of excitement or contentment, or just a feeling of knowing they’ve found “the right one.” Others remember the moment in great detail, as if time had stood still when they met the […]]]>

Some people vividly remember the first time they laid eyes on their partner. Some people describe the sensation as a spark, a feeling of excitement or contentment, or just a feeling of knowing they’ve found “the right one.” Others remember the moment in great detail, as if time had stood still when they met the love of their life.

Are these magical encounters real or fantastic? Research has answers.

Source: Image by Pexels from Pixabay

Passion at first sight

Florian Zsok et al (2017) conducted an empirical investigation into the type of “love” that occurs at first sight. [i] They refer to love at first sight (LAFS) as a commonly recognized phenomenon that lacks a significant body of supporting research. They note that psychological theories of love contemplate LAFS as evidenced by a large amount of passion. Still, they note that it could represent an improvement in memory that couples create in an effort to improve their relationship. Zsok et al. studied LAFS by assessing feelings of love the moment study participants first met potential mates.

They found that LAFS ‘experiences were not characterized by great passion, intimacy, or commitment, but by physical attraction. As a result, they argue that LAFS is not its own distinct form of love, but is more aptly characterized as a “strong initial pull” described as LAFS at first glance or in retrospect.

Zsok et al. conclude that some people really experience LAFS when they first meet a partner, as opposed to just looking back through a biased pink-colored rearview mirror. However, LAFS doesn’t seem to involve feelings of actual love, but a passion, often accompanied by a willingness to start a relationship. Another good news reported by Zsok et al. is that reporting LAFS seems to be related to experiencing more love and passion in a relationship.

The seduction of similitude

Others have speculated that LAFS might involve an initial attraction to other similar people both visually and in personality. James A. Grant-Jacob in “Love at First Sight” (2016) [ii] believes that because similar attributes attract, people can become emotionally attached to another person at first sight. He explains that because most people are attracted to others whom they think they trust and these people often have similar personalities, people are drawn to others who are alike because they are perceived to have similar personalities. similar. He cites research indicating that couples with similar physical attributes enjoy strong relationship commitment and stability.

Acknowledging the superficiality of love at first sight, Grant-Jacob acknowledges the argument that someone might become attached to someone they don’t share common ground with, thus limiting the length of the relationship. He notes, however, that the positive impact of a first impression can actually make up for the superficiality of the attraction at first glance, and the initial positivity can be replaced with predictability and familiarity, potentially resulting in long-term attraction.

Other researchers have found that couples who fall in love at first sight enter into romantic relationships more quickly. However, they did not all share the same personality traits, nor did they have an inferior relationship quality. [iii]

The gaze of lasting love

Regardless of your views on propriety and the possibility of love at first sight, when a relationship is sparked by an initial attraction, partners can fan the flame with respect, kindness, and build trust. In this way, we can maximize the possibility that the experience of love at first sight will turn into lasting love.


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Renowned Clinical Psychologist Launches “Sessions with Dr. Mark Lerner” TV Show http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/renowned-clinical-psychologist-launches-sessions-with-dr-mark-lerner-tv-show/ Fri, 31 Dec 2021 00:55:00 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/renowned-clinical-psychologist-launches-sessions-with-dr-mark-lerner-tv-show/ The show is in the vein of HBO’s Emmy, Golden Globe and Writers Guild award-winning show, “In Treatment.” LOS ANGELES, CA, UNITED STATES, December 30, 2021 /EINPresswire.com/ – In 2008, an HBO drama called “In Treatment” debuted and ran until 2010. The program, about a psychologist and his patients, aired five nights a week. It […]]]>

The show is in the vein of HBO’s Emmy, Golden Globe and Writers Guild award-winning show, “In Treatment.”

LOS ANGELES, CA, UNITED STATES, December 30, 2021 /EINPresswire.com/ – In 2008, an HBO drama called “In Treatment” debuted and ran until 2010. The program, about a psychologist and his patients, aired five nights a week. It has won critical acclaim and numerous honors, including Emmy, Golden Globe, and Writers Guild awards. There was clearly an audience for fictitious, meticulously scripted therapy sessions.

Today, there is an unquenchable thirst for video on demand (VOD) content by both VOD services and viewers. “Sessions with Dr. Marc Lerner“is an inspiring and enlightening television series that focuses on the lives of renowned individuals who have overcome and become.

Cold episodes opened in years past, where distinguished “clients” stage unscripted sessions of a turbulent period in the sanctuary of a psychologist’s office. Viewers are the proverbial flies on the wall, intently watching clients articulate authentic, unscripted thoughts and feelings. The psychotherapeutic community provides a unique forum for people to elucidate their stories. Ultimately, clients return to the present and share with Dr. Lerner how they harnessed their emotional energy to become who they are today.

Program creator Lerner says: “TV executives, producers and directors for video on demand (VOD) services such as Prime Video, Netflix, Hulu, discovery +, Disney +, Paramount +, HBO Max, Showtime, STARZ , Sling, and Apple TV + are looking for innovative and timely TV content. Viewers are looking for new TV shows that inspire and enlighten them. People are fascinated by the lives of famous individuals, especially those who have overcome adversity. ”

While the interviews are structured and cognitive, rehearsed and reflective, the sessions with Dr. Mark Lerner are unscripted and real. “Challenges don’t define us. The way we respond to them often does, ”Lerner said.

Please visit SESSIONSwith DRMARKLERNER.com review the production concept.

Dr Mark Lerner is a clinical and forensic psychologist, author and speaker who focuses on helping people through challenge and change. Dr Lerner regularly provides practical information, training and support to organizations and businesses, educational institutions, healthcare providers and first responders around the world. Dr Lerner has been called upon to consult and train organizations, including public and private companies, hospitals, pharmaceutical and pharmaceutical companies, airlines, police, fire and emergency services, medical establishments. education, the FBI, the US Department of Homeland Security and the United Nations in New York and Paris, France.

Aurora Rose
Unlimited Media Inc.
+1 951-870-0099
write us here


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Dr Dominic Bucciarelli Kasony’s new book “Autism: A Practical Guide for Parents” is an excellent source of information for parents of a child with autism. http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/dr-dominic-bucciarelli-kasonys-new-book-autism-a-practical-guide-for-parents-is-an-excellent-source-of-information-for-parents-of-a-child-with-autism/ Wed, 29 Dec 2021 05:13:51 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/dr-dominic-bucciarelli-kasonys-new-book-autism-a-practical-guide-for-parents-is-an-excellent-source-of-information-for-parents-of-a-child-with-autism/ PORT CHARLOTTE, Florida (PRWEB) December 29, 2021 Dr. Dominic Bucciarelli Kasony, a member of the Pennsylvania Psychological Association, a licensed professional counselor, a certified psychologist who performs psychological testing and counseling services for children with childhood disorders; completed their new book “Autism: A Practical Guide for Parents”: an educational self-help book for families with a […]]]>

PORT CHARLOTTE, Florida (PRWEB) December 29, 2021

Dr. Dominic Bucciarelli Kasony, a member of the Pennsylvania Psychological Association, a licensed professional counselor, a certified psychologist who performs psychological testing and counseling services for children with childhood disorders; completed their new book “Autism: A Practical Guide for Parents”: an educational self-help book for families with a child labeled autistic. It features information on what to expect when living with a child with ASD and tips on how to deal with communication issues and behavioral challenges that arise along the way. The author has designed this to be understandable read for parents and professionals alike in the hopes of safely guiding these unique children to reach their full potential.

Dr Kasony shares, “Autism: A Practical Guide for Parents was written from the perspective of a father of (now adult) disabled children who is also a licensed and certified psychologist and counselor. When parents are faced with serious medical problems with their children, they become very gullible in the face of exaggerated and unethical claims from health care providers. The book contains substantial information on behavioral interventions to help solve behavioral problems in children with autism, including an extensive reading list to help supplement parent knowledge and interventions. In addition, a section is devoted to various (and sometimes mistaken) interventions including chelation, transcranial magnetic therapy, light therapy and others. A research section is included to emphasize the importance of psychometric testing and examination for the development of a reliable and valid vehicle test assessment.

A psychological approach to understanding autism begins with a specific perspective of this challenge. First of all, children are children, including children with autism. Second, you need to be aware of a wide range of autism symptoms including behavioral, medical, speech and language, and physical. In addition, you should join a behavioral health team, including a psychologist, behavior specialist, therapy support staff, and / or mobile therapist through your local managed care organization. Remember that you can make positive changes in your child’s behavior and emotional health to help them lead happy, healthy, and productive lives.

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I have organized this book to be easy to read for parents and professionals. I’m sure you wouldn’t want to read the abstract details of existential phenomenology, but instead let me help you understand the details of autistic behavior from a psychologist and father’s perspective. I hope I have succeeded in this task! “

published by Publishing Pages, Dr. Dominic Bucciarelli Kasony’s informative opus aimed at helping children on the spectrum live fulfilling lives. He also explains the reasons that make these children unique in their own way.

This volume is written from the empathetic perspective of a father and child psychologist to spread hope and positivity. He aspires that through this work readers will acquire a fair and balanced approach to ASD.

Readers who wish to experience this meaningful work can purchase “Autism: A Practical Guide for Parents” in bookstores around the world, or online at the Apple iTunes Store, Amazon, Google Play or Barnes and Noble.

For more information or for media inquiries, contact Publishing Pages at 866-315-2708.

On Publishing Pages:

Publishing Pages is a traditional, full-service publishing house that handles all of the intricacies involved in publishing its authors’ books, including distribution to the world’s largest retail outlets and royalty generation. Publishing Pages knows that authors should be free to create, not bogged down in logistics like converting eBooks, setting up wholesale accounts, insurance, shipping, taxes, etc. Page writers and publishing professionals allow authors to leave these complex and time-consuming problems behind and focus on their passion – writing and creating. Learn more about http://www.pagepublishing.com.

Read the full story at https://www.prweb.com/releases/dr_dominic_bucciarelli_kasonys_new_book_autism_a_practical_guide_for_parents_is_a_great_resource_of_information_for_parents_of_a_child_with_autism/prweb18409709.htm


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Do my children get carried away in their flight from reality? | Sophie brickman http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/do-my-children-get-carried-away-in-their-flight-from-reality-sophie-brickman/ Mon, 27 Dec 2021 11:33:00 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/do-my-children-get-carried-away-in-their-flight-from-reality-sophie-brickman/ Never confuse fantasy with “reality”. It’s a phrase that has floated, jokingly, in my family since my father’s coworker told him the bungle years ago. We New Yorkers of course never confuse fantasy with reality. But in our house, we happily confuse the two all the time. For months last year, as we were browsing […]]]>

Never confuse fantasy with “reality”.

It’s a phrase that has floated, jokingly, in my family since my father’s coworker told him the bungle years ago. We New Yorkers of course never confuse fantasy with reality. But in our house, we happily confuse the two all the time.

For months last year, as we were browsing Laura Ingalls Wilder’s Little House on the Prairie series, my kindergarten child was walking around the apartment in a full pioneer girl outfit, with a beanie, wondering how better to break the oxen or down to the ground. She’s committed, deeply, to the role, cut from the same fabric as Jeremy Strong and other method players, insisting that her pajamas were made of calico and roasted in the dress all summer long, even as she claimed that a blizzard was swirling outside and that ‘she could see his breath in the air.

“Do you want ice cream? This, my preschooler asks from various perches as his imaginary ice cream stand wanders the living room, the sadistic vendor offering flavors that often suddenly run out. On rare occasions, she transforms into a medic, offering injections with her spoons, although she is highly specialized, treating only one disease: jumping so high on the trampoline that you injure your arm. It’s a sloppy version of what happened to her older sister, who broke her elbow last year after falling from monkey bars, but remains etched in her mind as something very serious that can be repaired with a rapid injection. And over the past few weeks, his pretend play has gotten even more intense, with nightly requests for bedtime stories related to trampoline crashes.

“At two and a half, three, the blur between reality and fantasy is blurry,” Kathy Hirsh-Pasek told me when I reached her by phone. “And I think fantasy is very powerful for kids – it’s a safe place.”

Hirsh-Pasek is Professor of Psychology at Temple University, where she studies child development, and Principal Investigator at the Brookings Institution. I called her in hopes that she could put my kids’ amplified pretend play against the backdrop of our chaotic year. Was it a cry for help, an indication that our new normal, with its constantly moving lines in the sand – you can see Nana and Papa inside, but with masks on, or maybe only inside? ‘outside, but at a distance; here’s a Zoom kit kicked out of school before winter break, which we may have to use, but probably not – was it wreaking havoc?

When the children of Hirsh-Pasek were in this liminal reality-fantasy age, she told me, there were real monsters in their closet.

“So we had a whole ceremony with dream catchers, we turned the mattress, we caught the monsters and we threw them in the toilet,” she recalls. “We let kids know that they have the power to control something, even if they don’t. It’s a really powerful message.

And this can be especially important now, as children, even immune to the specifics of this continuing uncertainty, internalize more than we know.

“They remember every little thing we do, they model it, they understand it, they look at us like they’re sociologists,” Hirsh-Pasek said. “And we were a wreck.”

I might not wear a calico dress and hand out snapshots for hyper specific trampoline accidents, but haven’t we all lived, a bit, in a fantasy land in the past year and a half? Every time I cook and then cancel dinner plans; whenever I convince myself that on such and such a date, I won’t need to put a tiny surgical mask on my little urban doctor and send her to kindergarten; every night I think I’ll give up that handful, or three, of leftover Halloween candy to relax – it’s fancy. But, for a few moments, I live in this safe space. Children do this much longer, finding real comfort in their imaginations.

The kindergarten kid and I just finished reading The BFG, which I found both a particularly enjoyable way to suspend reality, but also a wonderful allegory of parenthood during the pandemic. For the four people who have yet to read this Roald Dahl classic (spoilers ahead), it’s about a tall, friendly giant and orphan, Sophie, who sees him on a pitch black night from the window. of the orphanage, while he blows something in a child’s room opposite. He sees her staring, picks her up and takes her to the Land of Giants, where she learns that while the BFG catches dreams and blows them into children’s rooms at night, there are other evil giants roaming the land. world, ripping people from their beds and eating them. The plot turns when Sophie and the BFG decide to do something. In the end, the giant villains are captured, and like most of Dahl’s fictions, the Child triumphs.

“It offers a way to say yes, there are monsters out there, but guess what, we have the power to deal with them,” Hirsh-Pasek told me. “Fantasy can make scary things less scary, help kids cope a little better, and show them that with us they have the power to change everything. She stopped. “Maybe that’s not 1000% honest. I understand. But I am down to earth with the fantasy. (She later sent me a study concluding that young children often learn real-world information better if it is featured in a fantasy story that violates real-world paradigms.)

The other night, hoping to extend my nighttime getaways with Dahl, I looked up the name on the BFG sign-up page: Olivia. A quick Google search pushed the moment onto its axis, refocusing much like a zoom of a Hitchcockian dolly. Olivia was the daughter of Dahl, who died suddenly in 1962, at the age of seven, of encephalitis caused by measles.

“As the disease was on its usual course, I remember reading to him often in bed and not feeling particularly alarmed,” he wrote in a widely circulated open letter urging parents to vaccinate their children. children, published during a measles epidemic in 1986. “Then one morning, when she was well on the road to recovery, I was sitting on her bed showing her how to shape small animals with medicine. colorful pipes, and when it was her turn to make one herself, I noticed that her fingers and her mind weren’t working together… Within an hour, she was unconscious. In twelve hours she was dead.

He dedicated James and the Giant Peach to Olivia while she was still alive. Twenty years after his death, he published The BFG with his name in mind. As Dahl knew so well, in fantasy you can do anything: make rivers of chocolate, fly inside giant peaches, even bring girls back to life.

The vanity of the book, which you learn in the last few pages, is that the BFG actually wrote the thing and just published it under another name. The night we finished, my kindergarten child stared at the blanket for a while.

“I don’t think that’s true,” she said. My heart sank as I imagined him crossing that invisible border, from fanatic to hardened realist, a transition I feared would accelerate in recent years. Then, as she closed her eyes and began to fall asleep, she muttered: Actually is that Sophie told the story to Roald Dahl, and he wrote it.

And of course, in a way, she’s right.


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A blue Christmas? Take the time to grieve and understand what you need, says psychologist http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/a-blue-christmas-take-the-time-to-grieve-and-understand-what-you-need-says-psychologist/ Sat, 25 Dec 2021 20:30:00 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/a-blue-christmas-take-the-time-to-grieve-and-understand-what-you-need-says-psychologist/ Not everyone will be singing Christmas carols or decorating hallways this Christmas and that’s okay, says a psychologist. Janine Hubbard, president of the Association of Psychology Newfoundland and Labrador, says that if loved ones have passed away this year or in previous years, vacations – which typically include rituals and family time – can cause […]]]>

Not everyone will be singing Christmas carols or decorating hallways this Christmas and that’s okay, says a psychologist.

Janine Hubbard, president of the Association of Psychology Newfoundland and Labrador, says that if loved ones have passed away this year or in previous years, vacations – which typically include rituals and family time – can cause feelings of loss. more intense loss.

“Remember, there is no right or wrong way to grieve,” Hubbard said. “It’s a very individual process for everyone.”

Whether people choose to share memories or decide to have a muted party, everyone has a right to know how they are feeling and need to grieve, Hubbard said. In time, however, Hubbard said there are ways to encourage those who have died to celebrate traditions again.

“I have a Christmas baking tradition that reminds me of Christmas Eve at my grandmother’s every year,” Hubbard said. “These are the ways in which we can find some of these rituals, these traditions, so that our loved ones continue with us in a fun way.”

From left to right: Jovie Esguerra, Epitacia Bruce, Josie Estoque and Salve Achacoso. Achacoso said Bruce was like a second mother to her while raising her children. (Submitted by Katherine Achacoso)

It will be a different Christmas, say the family of Epitacia Bruce, commonly known as “Aunt Pitt”. Bruce was the first registered Filipino to come to Labrador. She arrived in 1965 and taught throughout Central Labrador.

Bruce passed away on November 15.

Salve Achacoso said her sister was her confidante and like a second mother to her as Achacoso was the youngest in her family of 15 members. When Achacoso started having children of his own, Bruce took on the role of grandmother.

“It is this great aunt who has a big heart that is enough for everyone in the family,” said Achacoso.

All the sisters of the Epitacia Bruce family. From left to right: Jovie Esguerra, Pablita Enable, Carmelita Matugas, Pitt Catre Bruce, Josie Estoque and Salve Achacoso. Epitacia Bruce, “Aunt Pitt” passed away on November 15, 2021. (Submitted by Katherine Achacoso)

Maricar Matugas-Ballantyne said her aunt was larger than life, with a smile and kind words to everyone. Now the family is preparing to leave for the holidays without Bruce, along with one of Achacoso’s other siblings and her husband, who passed away this fall, adding to the family’s grief.

“It’s very painful,” Achacoso said. “Knowing that I have to be strong for the family, I have to be able to show them that strength has its merit in that there will always be fights in life, but you have to keep your head above it.”

Matugas-Ballantyne agreed, saying it was hard to get into the Christmas spirit, but it gave him a chance to reflect and learn.

“Time spent with loved ones is very precious and is not forever,” said Matugas-Ballantyne. “We have to make sure we tell our loved ones that we love them because you never know when you will be able to see them for the last time.”

Don’t force the holiday spirit

Hubbard cautions against forcing yourself into the Christmas spirit, and says practicing kindness is key during the holiday season.

Understanding that emotions can be unpredictable, she suggests, can help ease the burden.

Psychologist Janine Hubbard says it’s important to take the time to grieve that you need this holiday season. (Meghan McCabe / CBC)

For those supporting someone suffering the after-effects of a death, monitoring them is essential, she said.

“It’s always a good idea, anyone, whether they’ve lost someone or are just alone over the holiday season to reach out,” Hubbard said.

As the holidays approach, Matugas-Ballantyne and Achacoso hope people will remember their sister and aunt as a happy person who was always there for others in times of need, had a big heart and wanted to shoot. the best of every moment.

“I hope I can be like her in terms of living fully without regret,” said Matugas-Ballantyne.

Read more about CBC Newfoundland and Labrador


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