Psychology course – Populer Psikoloji http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 18:36:07 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-01T204530.168-150x150.png Psychology course – Populer Psikoloji http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/ 32 32 Effective WHO psychological intervention to prevent mental disorders among Syrian refugees in Turkey http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/effective-who-psychological-intervention-to-prevent-mental-disorders-among-syrian-refugees-in-turkey/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 17:29:20 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/effective-who-psychological-intervention-to-prevent-mental-disorders-among-syrian-refugees-in-turkey/ A self-help psychological intervention developed by the World Health Organization, Self-Help Plus, has been effective in preventing the onset of mental disorders among Syrian refugees in Turkey, according to a study published today in World Psychiatry. The study, the first randomized controlled trial on the prevention of mental disorders conducted among Syrian refugees suffering from […]]]>

A self-help psychological intervention developed by the World Health Organization, Self-Help Plus, has been effective in preventing the onset of mental disorders among Syrian refugees in Turkey, according to a study published today in World Psychiatry. The study, the first randomized controlled trial on the prevention of mental disorders conducted among Syrian refugees suffering from psychological distress but without a diagnosis of a mental disorder, found that the odds of having a mental disorder six months after the intervention were d. ‘About half for participants receiving Self -Help Plus compared to those in the control arm.

Almost all of the 642 adults enrolled in the trial, which ended in June 2020, were from Syria, with others from Iraq, the Occupied Palestinian Territory and Yemen. The average age of participants was 31, with almost 63% female. Half of the participants received Self-Help Plus and Enhanced Care As Usual (ECAU, consisting of support and / or social care provided on a routine basis) and half received ECAU alone.

A format provided by facilitators trained in a group setting

Self-Help Plus (SH +) is based on Acceptance and Engagement Therapy, a form of cognitive behavioral therapy. It consists of a pre-recorded audio course, delivered by non-specialized trained facilitators in a group setting and supplemented by an illustrated self-help book adapted to the target cultural group. Audio material provides information on stress management and guides participants through individual exercises and small group discussions. The self-help book covers all essential content and concepts. In accordance with the structure of the intervention, during the trial in Turkey, the course was delivered in five sessions of 2 hours.

In the trial in Turkey, supported by the European Commission, Self-Help Plus participants were significantly less likely to have mental disorders at six-month follow-up compared to the ECAU group (22% vs. 41%). The risk reduction appeared to be similar for the most common diagnoses of mental disorders – depression, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and anxiety disorders. Consistent with this, Self-Help Plus participants also showed improvements in symptoms of depression, self-identified psychological findings, and quality of life during a six-month follow-up.

Potential for expansion to other large refugee populations

Considering the magnitude of the effect observed in the study and the fact that Self-Help Plus can be provided to large groups of up to 30 participants at a time by lay facilitators after a short training, the results of the trial suggest that the intervention could be scaled up as a public health strategy to prevent mental disorders in large refugee populations exposed to continuing adversity. However, since the intervention does not address the determinants of refugee mental health issues, it must be applied with a strong advocacy for the protection of those facing adversity and for services that meet their needs. broader social, physical and mental health.

Significant need for mental health support among refugee populations

In 2020, the number of forcibly displaced people around the world, 80 million, was the highest since World War II. Among them, 26 million fled their country because of violence or persecution. The largest group of refugees came from Syria, representing 6.6 million people. An estimated 3.6 million Syrian refugees are currently living in Turkey. The WHO estimates that the rates of depression, PTSD and any mental disorder among people exposed to conflict over the past 10 years are 11%, 15% and 22%, respectively.

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Students and faculty express concern about return to face-to-face teaching | Texas A&M University-San Antonio http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/students-and-faculty-express-concern-about-return-to-face-to-face-teaching-texas-am-university-san-antonio/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 19:56:53 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/students-and-faculty-express-concern-about-return-to-face-to-face-teaching-texas-am-university-san-antonio/ With the start of a new year, the Texas A&M University-San Antonio social media team released a series of posts welcoming the return of in-person teaching this spring. “Comment below on what you are most looking forward to in this new semester,” a caption read with a photo of a student working at the campus […]]]>

With the start of a new year, the Texas A&M University-San Antonio social media team released a series of posts welcoming the return of in-person teaching this spring.

“Comment below on what you are most looking forward to in this new semester,” a caption read with a photo of a student working at the campus library.

These messages were initially greeted with some enthusiasm, but with the approach of the spring semester and the increase in COVID-19 cases locally, more and more students began to express their dissatisfaction with the this positive message.

Cyrena De Leon, a psychology student, was one of the first students to express her discomfort.

“(I am) concerned about the lack of communication regarding the upsurge in COVID cases,” she commented on Instagram on January 4.

“Why are we putting our campus in danger? We need options.

Due to factors such as vacation travel and the dominant, highly transmissible Omicron variant, San Antonio has seen a significant peak in cases since the beginning of the year.

All other major local colleges have has announced plans to start the spring semester online.

In a final update ahead of the semester, A&M-San Antonio reiterated its initial plans to “adhere to state and system guidelines“promising to provide students with rapid tests and N95 masks to slow the spread of the virus on campus.

This update has only intensified the online outrage from students and faculty alike.

Within hours, the ad received nearly 200 comments on social media platforms.

Eddie De Leon, a computer junior who has expressed his concern online, says he feels “compelled to return” to his classes in person.

“Everyone has someone they care for who may not have access to a vaccine or who is immunocompromised,” De Leon said in an interview on Jan. 8.

“For us to go back and pretend nothing is happening … it doesn’t make me feel safe – it doesn’t make people I know feel safe or their families feel safe.” . “

English senior Madison Cardenas has contacted The Mesquite to express her concerns about the coming semester.

Cardenas said the university’s recent problems with housing, budgeting and COVID-19 were the administration’s fault.

“I think if (the university) has so much going wrong in such a quick succession, something is wrong,” Cardenas said. “I don’t blame the staff at all… It has to be at the administration level.

Cardenas said she wanted students to remember their concerns were important and should be voiced.

“We pay the tuition and we go there and we support this campus and everyone with it,” Cardenas said. “I think we deserve to have these opinions heard. “

Some faculty members have also expressed apprehension about returning to campus.

Representing more than 30 instructors on campus, the A&M-San Antonio chapter of the American Association of University Teachers (AAUP) posted a series of tweets criticizing the university’s decision in the first week of January.

According to Scott Gage, associate professor of English and director of the AAUP chapter of A & M-San Antonio, the university has shown a lack of “care and concern” for faculty, staff and students over other local colleges.

“There appears to be a narrative that the pandemic is over,” Gage said in an interview on Jan. 7.

Gage says the university’s recent post around COVID-19 is “based on a story of hope that just doesn’t match current reality.”

Administrators and spokespersons were largely silent when contacted by The Mesquite.

The office of University President Cynthia Teniente-Matson refused to discuss COVID-19 protocols in Mesquite on January 7, referring a reporter to the Office of Marketing and Communications, who did not answer phone calls.

Mark Weichold, the university’s new acting rector, told a reporter that the university would issue an announcement on Jan. 7 that would offer “some indication of our expectations for the spring.”

The university does not expect “any change of schedule or modality for the courses” according to their last update posted on social media on January 7.


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IIM-A begins mental wellness course http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/iim-a-begins-mental-wellness-course/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 04:28:45 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/iim-a-begins-mental-wellness-course/ The Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad (IIM-A) has launched a full-fledged elective (optional) course on mental and emotional well-being. Emphasizing the general structure of the course, Professor Pradyumana Khokle, Dean (Program) of IIT-Ahmedabad, states that while positive thinking, mindfulness, happiness, emotional well-being, values ​​and ethics , among others, have always been part of the full-time […]]]>

The Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad (IIM-A) has launched a full-fledged elective (optional) course on mental and emotional well-being.

Emphasizing the general structure of the course, Professor Pradyumana Khokle, Dean (Program) of IIT-Ahmedabad, states that while positive thinking, mindfulness, happiness, emotional well-being, values ​​and ethics , among others, have always been part of the full-time program and executive MBA courses, it is for the first time that a full and comprehensive course is organized by the institute.

Professor Khokle, who previously worked at Tata Motors’ Pune plant in the prototype testing department, says awareness of its importance has increased dramatically during the pandemic.

The course, offered to second year MBA students and in its first iteration, involves a combination of conceptual study and practical exploration in an 80:20 ratio. Practical work that involves workshops and off-site sessions is conducted using well-established tools and methods. Students can then continue their education in subject-matter master’s courses in specialized areas of organizational development or psychology. In addition, it also offers the possibility of undertaking long-term research in the field.

According to the management of IIM-Ahmedabad, the response from the students was good with 45 choosing him. A class size of 40 to 60 students is considered a good number for elective subjects, says Professor Khokle.

Management points out that while there was no explicit request from India Inc or other stakeholders, professors who worked across sectors took clues as to demand trends. Likewise, an online leadership course “Understanding the Bhagavad Gita”, which has been offered since 2016, has 48 students. Values ​​and ethics, behavioral orientation, role conflicts, purpose, leadership and conflict resolution are among the key elements of this course. . As social science courses see an increase in demand, professional development topics such as business analysis are also gaining in importance.

Professor Anindya Chakrabarti, co-chair of the e-Post Graduate Diploma in Advanced Business Analytics (ePGD ABA) program, reveals that business analysis is currently one of the most sought-after courses for development. “The program offers a carefully thought-out mix of courses in tools and techniques for data visualization, modeling and analysis of varieties of data of different sizes, machine learning algorithms, and cloud computing. And finally, domain-specific applications of data analysis in marketing, human resources, finance, operations and public policy and the skills required to integrate the results of the analysis into business implications that can support decision making ” , says Professor Chakrabarti





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Why does performance deteriorate under pressure? http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/why-does-performance-deteriorate-under-pressure/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 05:02:00 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/why-does-performance-deteriorate-under-pressure/ Experts such as pianists, athletes and surgeons learn their skills through extensive practice. However, the neurophysiological and psychological mechanisms underlying the problem of making errors due to psychological stress remain unexplored under pressure situations such as piano competitions or the Olympics. Training to prevent such mistakes also remains unexplored, despite the fact that they can […]]]>

Experts such as pianists, athletes and surgeons learn their skills through extensive practice. However, the neurophysiological and psychological mechanisms underlying the problem of making errors due to psychological stress remain unexplored under pressure situations such as piano competitions or the Olympics. Training to prevent such mistakes also remains unexplored, despite the fact that they can pose a threat to one’s profession and career.

Dr Shinichi Furuya and colleagues at Sony Computer Science Laboratories, Inc., along with Kwansei Gakuin University alumnus Professor Noriko Nagata and Reiko Ishimaru, discovered a training method to prevent fine motor impairment pianists due to psychological stress. The research group examined the robustness of processes that integrate auditory functions that perceive timing and motor functions that produce precise finger movements, transiently delaying the timing of sound production on an electronic piano to the Using a tailor-made auditory feedback system that can manipulate the volume and timing of piano sounds, then assess the degree of disturbance in piano performance immediately after the disturbance.

< Research content >

First, in Experiment 1, by artificially generating rhythmic errors during piano performance, we sought to clarify how pianists use auditory information to skillfully control the movement of their fingers. While the pianists were playing a piece of music at a specified tempo, we artificially delayed the timing of sound production from 80 milliseconds (one millisecond is one thousandth of a second) to the moment the pianist could not predict, and have investigated the extent to which subsequent performance was disrupted. In order to create a situation of increased psychological stress, another pianist observed and evaluated the performance while standing right next to the playing pianist. In addition, a video camera was placed in front of the artist in order to record the performance. The experiment was conducted with 11 pianists, and we found a significant decrease in the accuracy of the timing of the keystrokes with the presentation of delayed auditory feedback, only during performances in which the pianists were under psychological stress. This reaction is similar to that shown by those with no previous musical training experience (i.e. non-musicians) in situations without psychological stress. This indicates that with psychological stress, abnormally excessive motor disturbances occur as a reaction to erroneous information derived from the auditory perception of rhythm. However, such dysfunctions associated with psychological pressure have not been observed for the auditory function of discriminating between two sounds presented successively and the identification of the time interval between them, or the motor function responsible for speed and speed. precision of movement when moving fingers at the fastest speed. .

Next, in Experiment 2, we examined the effects of auditory-motor training using our auditory feedback system with 30 pianists. The training lasted for tens of minutes, after which the pianists were invited to perform under psychological stress. The research groups included two training groups with 10 pianists each: a training group that practiced ignoring the delay in the timing of sound production during piano performance (delay-ignore group); and a training group that practiced the strikes with faster than normal timing to compensate for the artificial delay in sound production (delay-adaptation group). In addition, there was another group of 10 pianists (control group) who had not received any training. A post-workout analysis was conducted to examine the performance disturbance (errors in the timing of the strike) caused by the presentation of delayed auditory feedback under psychological stress. This suggests that training normalized pianists’ ability to integrate auditory perception and movement, and so pianists could prevent erroneous finger movements in response to erroneous auditory information about rhythm, even under psychological stress. One of the reasons for this could be that, since the group to ignore the delay was trained not to excessively respond to abnormal auditory stimuli during performance, the training normalized the mental and physical functions that responded with an excessive degree of sensitivity to detected errors. through the ear under psychological pressure.

In summary, the deterioration of musical performance due to psychological stress was associated with a dysfunction of the skills of experts to control movement appropriately using auditory information, which degraded participants’ performance to a beginner’s level. The study also found that such skill impairment can be avoided with specialized sensorimotor training.

These findings may aid in the development of new theoretical approaches to pressure choking training and training systems for optimal performance under psychological stress, and to elucidate the neuroscientific, physiological and psychological mechanisms behind problems such as ‘performance anxiety and “yips” (symptoms of tension and anxiety in which actions that could be performed without problem in the normal situation cannot be performed as expected).

This research was conducted as part of the JST core strategic research program, Core Research for Evolutionary Science and Technology (CREST).

Research area: “Creation and development of basic technologies interfacing human and information environments” Research theme: “A study on the mechanisms of skills acquisition and the development of skills transfer systems”

/ Public distribution. This material from the original organization / authors may be ad hoc in nature, edited for clarity, style and length. The views and opinions expressed are those of the author (s). See it in full here.


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12 things our detractors are looking forward to in 2022 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/12-things-our-detractors-are-looking-forward-to-in-2022/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 06:40:10 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/12-things-our-detractors-are-looking-forward-to-in-2022/ As a new year begins (again), our reviews spotlight the television, movies, music, art, theater, dance, and comedy that promise welcome distraction. Marguerite Lyon The end of “Better Call Saul” I’ll be sad forever when “You better call Saul” is over, so part of me is actually dreading the sixth and final season. I never […]]]>

As a new year begins (again), our reviews spotlight the television, movies, music, art, theater, dance, and comedy that promise welcome distraction.


Marguerite Lyon

I’ll be sad forever when “You better call Saul” is over, so part of me is actually dreading the sixth and final season. I never want to say goodbye to Jimmy or Kim – but man, I’m dying to see them again. By the time “Saul” returns to AMC this spring, it will have been on hiatus for a full two years. (Bob odenkirk, her star, has recovered from a heart attack that occurred on set this year. most carefully woven in our time. Of course, thanks to “Breaking Bad,” we know exactly where some of these characters are heading, but not how they get there, what they think about it, or who they’ll hurt along the way. Come back soon! But also, take it slow.

OK, so yeah, it was weird that my friends Sherri-Ann and Amber and I were the only black people in the movies when we saw the movie “Downton Abbey” in 2019. At the time, we agreed that despite the lack of a colored world in the theater and on screen, we have always found pleasure in the grandeur – the clothing, the castle, the cast of the characters, especially the Dowager Countess of Grantham, Violet Crawley, wonderfully played. by Dame Maggie Smith. Now that we have set our calendars for March 18, 2022, for the rest, “Downton Abbey: a new era,“I can’t wait to see how the franchise tries to reinvent itself on the dawn of a new era, the 1930s, and how it performs in the current racial moment. (A black woman’s face appears in a trailer.) Partly in the south of France after the Dowager Countess learns she inherited a villa there, the film sends the Crawley clan upstairs and their employees downstairs on another adventure, with another marriage. While Julian Fellowes, the creator of “Downton,” has a new show, “The Gilded Age,” which premiered on HBO in January – which appears to be a bit more thoughtful in its approach to race, class and status. identity – here’s hoping that the sequel to ‘Downton’ bows out in the grand Grantham style.


Jane Wagner’s 1985 play “Searching for signs of intelligent life in the universe”Was tailor-made for chameleon gifts from his life partner (and, later, his wife), Lily Tomlin. Who else could have inhabited her 12 very distinct characters – including a runaway punk, a bored 1%, and a trio of disillusioned feminists – with such sardonic sympathy? When Tomlin won a Tony Award in 1986 for his work, it seemed to seal the idea that the performer and the play were one forever. But in the kind of casting that makes your head smack with pleasure, Cecily strong takes on Tomlin’s mantle in a Leigh Silverman-directed revival at the Hangar, which is scheduled to open on Jan.11. Strong – whose “Saturday Night Live” characters include Jeanine Pirro, the girl you wished you hadn’t struck up a conversation with Party and, more recently, Goober the clown who had an abortion when she was 23 – appears be another custom fit, almost four decades later.


Jon Pareles

Emerging from its own history as a stronghold of Western classical music, Carnegie Hall will be the hub of a city-wide multidisciplinary festival of Afrofuturism: the visionary and technophile ways in which the culture of the African diaspora has imagined alternative paths. The Carnegie series is set to begin on February 12 with the fast-paced and sometimes mind-blowing electronic musician Flying Lotus. (A challenge could be the acoustics of the main hall.) Performances at Zankel Hall include the Sun Ra Arkestra’s galactic jazz with cellist and singer Kelsey Lu and insurgent Moor Mother (February 17); flautist Nicole Mitchell at the helm of her Black Earth Ensemble; and clarinetist Angel Bat Dawid with his Autophysiopsychic Millennium (February 24); African-born hip-hop duo Chimurenga Renaissance and Malian composer Fatoumata Diawara (March 4); and DJ, composer and techno pioneer Carl Craig at the helm of his Synthesizer Ensemble (March 19). There is much more: five dozen other cultural organizations will organize festivals.


Anthony Tommasini

“Don Carlos” by Verdi may not be a flawless opera. But it is deep work; I consider it to be Verdi’s “Hamlet”. Written for the Paris Opera, it gave a nod to the grand French style and included epic scenes and choirs en masse. But when it premiered in 1867, it was deemed too long and ineffective. Verdi revised the opera several times, making cuts, translating the French libretto into Italian, leaving a confused legacy of revisions. the Metropolitan opera gives the audience the chance to hear the work as it was originally conceived in its French version in five acts, which many consider to be the best. Yannick Nézet-Séguin, who has directed some superb Met performances of the Italian adaptation, will be in that pit for this new production by David McVicar. The star-studded cast, led by tenor Matthew Polenzani in the title role, includes Sonya Yoncheva, Elina Garanca, Etienne Dupuis, Eric Owens and John Relyea. When performances begin on February 28, prepare for a five-hour show with two intermissions; I can not wait.


Mike hale

This winter brings more than the usual number of big stars taking time out for the small screen, like Uma Thurman (“Suspicion”), Christopher Walken (“Severance”) and Samuel L. Jackson (“The Last Days of Ptolemy Gray”) . The one that piques my interest the most is Renée Zellweger, assuming only her second leading TV role in “The thing about Pam, Which airs March 8 on NBC. Zellweger may be hit and miss, but her hits – “The Whole Wide World”, “Chicago”, “Judy” – keep her at the forefront of American actresses. Here she plays Pam Hupp, who is implicated in multiple deaths and is currently serving a life sentence for one of them, in a crime miniseries that showrunner Jenny Klein produced on solid TV shows like “The Witcher”. and “Jessica Jones”.


Jason farago

When the Museum of Modern Art opened its expanded home in 2019, its most important Picasso suddenly found itself with a new companion: a tumultuous panoramic painting of American violence that Gold Faith Ring painted 1967. Ringgold, born 91 years ago in Harlem, has never been an obscure figure: her art has been exhibited in the Clinton White House as well as in most New York museums; his children’s books have won awards and reached bestseller lists. But she had to wait too long for a retrospective of her career in her hometown. The one at the New Museum, which opens February 17, will reveal how Ringgold intertwined the political and the personal: first in his rigorously composed “American People” paintings, which channeled the civil rights movement into grid, repetitive, and syncopated forms; then in “history quilts” in reconstituted fabric representing Michael Jackson or Aunt Jemima, and geometric abstractions inspired by Tibetan silks and embroidery. The show is accompanied by a major chance to rediscover: the first release in more than two decades of its “French Collection”, a cycle of 12 quilts which retraces the history of Paris in the 1920s through the eyes of a fictional African-American artist and model. .


Maya phillips

Robert eggers has only directed two feature films, and yet he is already known as a director of beautifully weird and critically acclaimed films. “The Witch”, from 2016, was followed three years later by the sinister and confusing “The Lighthouse”. Both established Eggers as a stylistic descendant of the Brothers Grimm, a maker of macabre fables that descend in torrents of madness. That’s why I can’t wait to see his third feature film, “The man of the North“, which premieres on April 22, about a Viking prince seeking revenge on his murdered father. Infused with Icelandic mythology, the story is based on Amleth’s story, the inspiration of Prince Hamlet, my favorite sad boy in English literature. Eggers wrote the screenplay with Icelandic poet Sjón, so we can certainly expect an epic with epic writing to match. There’s also a stellar cast, including Alexander Skarsgård, Nicole Kidman, Ethan Hawke, Anya Taylor-Joy, Willem Dafoe – and Björk as a witch. I’d watch this on my own.


Gia Kourlas

Four quartets», An ambitious one-night work by the modern choreographer Pam tanowitz, lands at the Brooklyn Academy of Music next month (February 10-12), barring a Covid cancellation. Based on poems by TS Eliot, the production includes live narration by actress Kathleen Chalfant, music by Finnish composer Kaija Saariaho and set by Brice Marden; Tanowitz continues his exploration of the relationship between emotion and form.


Isabelle Herrera

Diaristic and quietly intense, Saba, a rapper from Chicago, is the kind of artist who mourns with heartwarming calm. In 2018, his record “Care for Me” tackled this theme the day after the murder of his cousin and collaborator, stabbed to death a year earlier. Released on February 4, his next album, “Few good things, ”Confronts life’s equally devastating challenges: the anxiety of generational poverty and the depths of survivor guilt. It takes up the undulating and poetic flows of Saba, which exude a deep sense of storytelling. The beats are always buttery, jazzed up and meticulously arranged. But this time around, there’s more wisdom – a recognition that going through trauma means finding gratitude and affirmation when you can.


Jason zinoman

“Quarter-Life Special”, the first special stand-up of Taylor tomlinson, presented a young artist with real potential. Tomlinson forcefully spoke of a clear character (happy but not the life of the party; rather, as she put it, “the weak pulse of the bribe”) and told jokes marked by a diverse arsenal of ‘acts and ways of distracting. She’s covered standard territory (dating, sex, parents, kids) with enough insight and dark undertones to grab your attention. More excitingly, every now and then she would let her thought process fly in unexpected delusional directions, like the story that led her to imagine a police-led sadness test. “Instead of a breathalyzer,” she explained, “they make you sigh in a harmonica.” This Netflix special caused a stir, but it probably would have been bigger if it hadn’t been released in March 2020. A pandemic later, she has another hour ready and another Netflix special on the way. She is now playing it on tour, which is slated to stop in New York in January at Town Hall and then at the Beacon Theater.


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Some College Memories Remain Vivid Over the Years Chroniclers http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/some-college-memories-remain-vivid-over-the-years-chroniclers/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 05:00:00 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/some-college-memories-remain-vivid-over-the-years-chroniclers/ There are stories that I have told over the years about my personal and professional life that are mostly accurate. (The “mostly” relates to faulty memory or an attempt to embellish it for entertainment purposes or to protect identities or for other reasons.) So I ask anyone reading this to understand that this should not […]]]>

There are stories that I have told over the years about my personal and professional life that are mostly accurate. (The “mostly” relates to faulty memory or an attempt to embellish it for entertainment purposes or to protect identities or for other reasons.) So I ask anyone reading this to understand that this should not be viewed as a “gospel”, but rather appreciated.

College is a once in many lifetimes experience. It certainly was for me, as I chose a small liberal arts college that only admitted men. She was not chosen because she was entirely male, but rather in spite of herself.

I was a naive country boy with no significant money to speak of and Wabash College offered me high quality scholarships and education as well as inordinate freedom.

When I got there, I didn’t know a living soul. It was therefore an opportunity to reinvent myself.

The only rule at Wabash was that a Wabash man “must conduct himself at all times, both on and off campus, like a gentleman and a responsible citizen.” Of course, this rule was subject to a fairly broad interpretation, which left a great deal of leeway for personal development.

Besides the lack of rules, there are several other unusual features of this institution, including diplomas written in Latin on real sheepskin. But what I want to talk to you about here is the requirement to pass comprehensive exams or “Comps” to graduate, regardless of your grade point average.

The Competitions are a test covering material from each course taken during all of your years at Wabash College. It included a written test as well as an oral grid by a panel of professors from the department of your major as well as at least one professor from another discipline.

In my case, I was crazy enough to major in chemistry, largely because he seemed to have questions that could be answered unequivocally. So the answer would be right or wrong which means I could study and understand the topic.

This contrasted with the literature or psychology courses I took, for example. Some of the tests in these classes had questions that could be interpreted in more than one way or points could be deducted due to the teacher’s style or opinion.

The concrete nature of chemistry as a subject, however, is more of a curse than a blessing when it comes to Comps, as there are right answers, making it nearly impossible to fake an answer.

As you can imagine, the time spent studying and taking Comps is incredibly stressful, as your entire college career can depend on your results.

I have told you all this so that you will understand the following story.

When my time came to take the written portion of Chemistry Comps in the spring of my senior year, I was assigned one end of a long table in the chemistry department library while a classmate of mine was taking the test at the other end. We were the only people in the room as the other chemistry majors were scattered around the rest of the chemistry building.

After four years with many classes together, I knew the other guy was brilliant. I expected him to complete the test in half the time it would take me to complete and score twice as well.

After we’re well into the test and over an hour has passed (Did I mention Written Comps are a timed test?) I heard moans from across the table. Naturally, my first thought was that he was way ahead of me and that he had found a scandalous question that even he was not prepared for and against which I wouldn’t stand a chance.

However, as the moans grew louder, I looked up from my test to see my brilliant classmate fall to the ground and start a fit of grand mal.

Not knowing what else to do, I called for help and tried to keep her from banging her head against the bookcases, table, and chairs around her.

Fortunately, it stopped seizing after several minutes which seemed like hours to me.

Next week, I’ll end this story and tell you another story to continue this change of pace as we begin the New Year.


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New laws of 2022 strengthen training, oversight and support :: WRAL.com http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/new-laws-of-2022-strengthen-training-oversight-and-support-wral-com/ Fri, 31 Dec 2021 16:21:00 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/new-laws-of-2022-strengthen-training-oversight-and-support-wral-com/ By Laura Leslie, WRAL Capitol Office Chief Raleigh, North Carolina – New North Carolina laws that come into effect on January 1, 2022 cover law enforcement training, local government corruption, firefighter cancer and healthcare. Of the 192 bills enacted in 2021, many became law when they were ratified. Others, like new criminal penalties, came into […]]]>

– New North Carolina laws that come into effect on January 1, 2022 cover law enforcement training, local government corruption, firefighter cancer and healthcare.

Of the 192 bills enacted in 2021, many became law when they were ratified. Others, like new criminal penalties, came into effect on December 1. But several significant policy changes, including some in the state budget, come into effect on Saturday.

Law enforcement officers will now have to undergo a psychological examination before they can be employed in the state. All law enforcement and justice officials will also receive required new regular training in mental health, as well as use of force and duty to intervene, community policing, minority sensitivity. and ethics.

Firefighters who are diagnosed with work-related cancer after January 1, 2022 can apply for a state pilot program to provide supplemental health insurance coverage through the state insurance department. The pilot program runs until June 2023.

Local elected officials who use their office for personal gain will now be subject to criminal prosecution. This follows corruption scandals in several cities across the state in recent years. The auditor will also be empowered to require external audits for local authorities in difficulty.

Adult nursing home supervisors will receive annual state training on approved infection prevention and control methods. The change was made in response to the pandemic, which has swept through many such facilities over the past two years.

People looking for information about behavioral health or drug treatment facilities will be able to search a new state database for complaints against those facilities.

People living in local state-assisted adult care homes will see their monthly personal needs allowance increased from $ 46 to $ 70.

Parents of foster and adopted children will receive an increase in their monthly assistance checks. For birth to 5 years old, the allowance goes from $ 475 to $ 514 per child per month. For children ages 6 to 12, it drops from $ 581 to $ 654 per child per month, and for teens ages 13 to 20, from $ 634 to $ 698 per child per month.

General contractors will be required to undergo a criminal background check to obtain their required state license. They will also be able to use approved online courses for the required continuing education hours.


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Understanding the science of stress and loneliness http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/understanding-the-science-of-stress-and-loneliness/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 01:00:00 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/understanding-the-science-of-stress-and-loneliness/ How did you develop your interest in psychology? When I was in school in Galway I was interested in science so I went to study engineering but soon realized I was more interested in people science. I think if psychology had been a subject in school I would have gone straight to college, but after […]]]>

How did you develop your interest in psychology?

When I was in school in Galway I was interested in science so I went to study engineering but soon realized I was more interested in people science. I think if psychology had been a subject in school I would have gone straight to college, but after I started engineering I reapplied psychology and that’s how I started to study it.

In what area of ​​psychology are you researching?

Basically, I’m looking at the psychology of health and stress, and right now we’re exploring loneliness in young adults. Loneliness is a hallmark of many mental health problems, and the emergence of adulthood is a time of great change. In this transition from adolescence to adulthood, around the age of 16 to 25, you are likely finishing school, perhaps leaving the family home, and building new networks of friends.

We know that the brain continues to develop significantly until the mid-twenties, and now we see that many cultural markers of adulthood, such as leaving home, getting married, starting a family, tend to happen later. It is therefore an interesting period in life for research from a biological and cultural point of view.

Tell us about some of the work you do.

I worked with Spunout.ie on a project funded by the Irish Research Council, where young adults talk about their views on what could lead to and maintain loneliness. This research brings together theories about loneliness and the experience of people in this age group.

Already from the data we have collected, we see that the quantity and quality of social connections are important for young adults, and that the pandemic has impacted them in terms of reduced opportunities.

Then, in the new year, my lab hopes to launch another research, this time on the psychology of this transition as young people with diabetes move from pediatric health services to adult health services, in order to better support this transition.

What would you like people to know about your field of work?

That we are looking for evidence and that we are trying to be objective. Because psychology is about people, we can all contribute something, but as researchers in psychology we take a scientific approach to studying human behavior, thoughts, and feelings. As researchers, we take a step back from our own experiences and focus on the evidence.

And what keeps you going?

Having an education or training in psychology is valuable, it helps you understand how others function – including yourself. I also really like the mix of research and teaching. Research in this area is evolving and I love that through teaching I can bring this new research to people who could then implement it outside of university, perhaps in clinical practice. Because research is only good if it is used or implemented.

Finally, how to gain space for yourself?

We have young children, ages two and three, so life is very busy. I find that since I have children, I need to be more realistic about the use of my time. I have to admit that maybe I cannot do absolutely everything I want to do and that it is more than normal to accept offers of help. I am fortunate to work with a great team of colleagues and PhD students, and that makes a huge difference.


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In defense of the liberal arts http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/in-defense-of-the-liberal-arts/ Tue, 28 Dec 2021 05:03:12 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/in-defense-of-the-liberal-arts/ During the holidays, families get together to reconnect and talk about their past, present and future. As often happens, those at the table or about to enter college will be asked what studies they are pursuing. And if the tradition holds good, there will be no miser at the table when it comes to giving […]]]>

During the holidays, families get together to reconnect and talk about their past, present and future. As often happens, those at the table or about to enter college will be asked what studies they are pursuing. And if the tradition holds good, there will be no miser at the table when it comes to giving advice and advice.

So when Uncle Harry asks you, “What the hell are you going to do with a degree in history?” Who needs the liberal arts? Be prepared with this response: “We all do it. “

As someone who goes to work with the incredibly talented professionals of Connecticut’s public television and radio every day – the home of “Media for the Curious” – trust me: society needs all critical thinking, of the curiosity and creativity that characterize the liberal arts can bring together, from sociology to history, the classics, the history of art, philosophy, theology, political science, the theater, the economics, psychology, mathematics and physics. Yes, math and physics are liberal arts too.

Connecticut is a shining beacon of educational institutions that value the liberal arts, but the cost is high – so high that for many it’s almost out of reach. As a result, the value of traditional liberal arts degrees is being flouted, with some colleges and universities feeling pressured to focus on so-called “hands-on” degrees that should make their graduates immediately employable. It is a false choice.

Connecticut’s tech, insurance, financial, and manufacturing companies need specialized skills to thrive, and many hiring managers are looking for people with the critical thinking skills honed by the liberal arts. After all, no challenge can stand up to the scrutiny, analysis, curiosity, and keenness of a mind whose gaze is lifted and eyesight widened by liberal arts training.

Albert Einstein said it best: “The value of a liberal arts education… is not learning many facts but training the mind to think about something that cannot be learned in manuals. The solution is therefore not to move the first generation students away from the liberal arts, but towards them.


I approach this issue from an extremely pragmatic point of view.

Every day at Connecticut Public, we create stories about some seemingly intractable issues in our world: climate change, strained democracy, lingering income inequalities, unresolved struggles against racial divisions, unequal access to housing, and bile-filled politics that encourages shrinking of the mind, not an expansion of it.

Think about it: in a world of ‘alternate facts’, where a social media post can spark an angry mob, we should be producing people whose minds and perspectives are shaped to be broad, perpetually inquisitive, and up-to-date. height of the analysis and resolution task. these problems.

People who changed the course of history have often developed and sharpened their minds through liberal arts education. A few of them are Alexander Hamilton, who studied literature and law; Ronald Reagan and George HW Bush, economics and sociology; Franklin and Teddy Roosevelt, history; and Jawaharlal Nehru, natural sciences.

Martin Luther King Jr. studied sociology; Judge Sonia Sotomayor, history; Harriet Beecher Stowe, Classics, Languages, Mathematics; Booker T. Washington, agriculture; Harvey Milk, mathematics; Marie Curie, Enrico Fermi and Frances Perkins, physics.

Oprah Winfrey studied Communication; Reed Hastings, mathematics; Audre Lorde, librarianship; David Brooks, history; Diane Sawyer, English and JK Rowling, French and Classics.

While a liberal arts degree does not guarantee that you will change the world in the same way as others, the world needs more problem solvers who dare to think, engage, observe, analyze, understand and sway. Express.

As the leader of an organization that provides media to the curious, there is no better way to support the curious than to advocate for the expansion of the liberal arts in our state.

Hoping that your vacation has been full of joy and, especially this coming year, curiosity.

Mark G. Contreras is President and CEO of Connecticut Public.


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WSU Tri-Cities student overcomes health challenges to graduate http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/wsu-tri-cities-student-overcomes-health-challenges-to-graduate/ Sun, 26 Dec 2021 13:00:00 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/wsu-tri-cities-student-overcomes-health-challenges-to-graduate/ Pasco, WA Climaco Abarca isn’t sure what he hit when he dived in the river near Burbank at the age of 15. He remembers that he didn’t hit rock bottom, but he saw a lot of blood when it started to flow. Now, more than 20 years after the accident that left him paralyzed, Abarca […]]]>

Climaco Abarca isn’t sure what he hit when he dived in the river near Burbank at the age of 15.

He remembers that he didn’t hit rock bottom, but he saw a lot of blood when it started to flow.

Now, more than 20 years after the accident that left him paralyzed, Abarca has completed his first full semester at Washington State University Tri-Cities with a view to pursuing legal studies.

“There is no way I can live on Social Security,” he said. “Eight hundred dollars a month doesn’t pay the bills. …. This is the main reason I did it, so that I can have a better tomorrow.

The journey back here has not been easy for the man from Pasco, now 36. He had to deal with years of fighting infections and a system didn’t save him money for college until recently.

Abarca’s cousin saved him from drowning on that April trip to the river, but that was only the start of what would turn into a complicated recovery. He spent a month in the hospital and more time in rehabilitation.

Through hard work, he was able to regain some mobility and returned to Pasco High School in the fall.

He took classes with the help of an assistant and joined the Running Start program at Columbia Basin College, which allowed him to take college courses while still in high school.

After a delay caused by his injury, he graduated in 2005. And the following year, he obtained his associate degree from CBC.

Things were looking up for him when he started at WSU Tri-Cities, but his success quickly derailed.

Provided Climaco Abarca.jpg
Climaco Abarca, a WSU Tri-Cities student in Pasco, returned to school after complications from his paralysis kept him out for more than a decade. Courtesy of WSU Tri-Cities

A decade of delays

In 2007, Abarca developed an infection on his tailbone which reduced his ability to attend class while he was receiving the treatment he needed.

The infection persisted for years. The surgeries helped her condition for a while, but the problems would return soon.

During a suspended period in 2012, he tried to return to WSU, but the infection forced him to quit again.

“I didn’t think I was ever going to finish,” he told the Herald.

Eventually he found a treatment that worked and was preparing to return to class in 2020, but the COVID-19 pandemic struck.

Tuition fees

Abarca was able to take advantage of a federal program that allows people receiving Supplementary Security Income (SSI) to save money without fear of losing their benefits.

Without access to Washington State’s ABLE Savings Plan, he could not save more than $ 2,000.

“But with the program, you can save more money. It takes money that you earn with your pay stubs every month and then you can use it for big purchases like school and other things. Without this program, I would never have been able to save enough for school, ”Abarca said in a statement from WSU Tri-Cities.

Although he has not yet been able to return to class, Abarca has still spent time volunteering.

He has assisted at Grace Clinic and served on the Board of Directors of the Tierra Vida Community Owners Association. He also volunteers as an interpreter.

And he spent the last year working as a contact tracer for the Benton-Franklin Health District.

Back to class

With her healthy health and in-person classes at the Richland campus, Abarca was ready to go back to school. He said it was important for him to show others not to give up.

“I have my nieces. I always encourage them to do better in school and that is the only way for them to be successful in life, ”he said.

After a decade away from class, the comeback turned out to be a bit of a struggle.

Even though it was difficult, he realized that his health was good and that he wasn’t going to be put off by a lower grade. He enlisted the help of the WSU Tri-Cities tutoring programs and was matched with an additional instructor who helped him get back on track.

“I came back to school thinking I would be where I was when I left school, but I had a rude awakening about it,” he said. “You realize that you have lost some of those skills that you had when you took regular classes. But honestly, with the support and help of the tutoring, I’m starting to get the grades I used to earn again.

He finished the semester passing 80 percent in one class and was successful in his other two classes. He hopes to complete his bachelor’s degree in psychology and pursue law studies at Gonzaga University in Spokane.

He wants to use this degree to help people like him. When he was injured, he couldn’t find anyone who knew the law and could help him.

“If there is something they can do to improve their situation, I want to be able to help them,” he said.

For now, Abarca is preparing for another semester and hopes to secure an internship at a law firm.

“I want people to know that if you’re healthy you can do it,” he said. “Things do happen, but you can overcome it as long as you have your health.”

Cameron Probert covers the latest news and education for the Tri-City Herald, where he tries to answer readers’ questions about why the police and firefighters are in your neighborhood. He studied communication at Washington State University.


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