Psychology test – Populer Psikoloji http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/ Wed, 12 Jan 2022 02:51:17 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-01T204530.168-150x150.png Psychology test – Populer Psikoloji http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/ 32 32 5 twists and turns of ’90s horror movies that stand the test of time http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/5-twists-and-turns-of-90s-horror-movies-that-stand-the-test-of-time/ Wed, 12 Jan 2022 02:00:00 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/5-twists-and-turns-of-90s-horror-movies-that-stand-the-test-of-time/ The 1990s spawned many beloved and gripping horror films. However, only a few of them are chosen for setting the audience’s expectations, only to overthrow them with a stunning twist at the end. A good horror movie goes beyond the fear of jumping, but instead creates a healthy narrative, introduces meaningful characters, and gives clues […]]]>

The 1990s spawned many beloved and gripping horror films. However, only a few of them are chosen for setting the audience’s expectations, only to overthrow them with a stunning twist at the end.

A good horror movie goes beyond the fear of jumping, but instead creates a healthy narrative, introduces meaningful characters, and gives clues to the plot’s resolution, all while keeping audiences on the edge of their feet. seats. A great horror movie does all of the above, but also takes viewers out of their comfort zone and offers a final twist that no one saw coming – these memorable ’90s horror movies do just that.

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RELATED: 5 underrated ’90s horror movies


Scream-1996

Wes Craven’s now cult slasher masterpiece kicked off a massive franchise, reinvigorated the genre, and featured a great combo of true bloodbath, dark comedy, and a guessing game. The film doesn’t take itself too seriously, grapples with established clichés, but still contains a lot of scares and an ultimate ending.

The story follows Sidney Prescott (Neve Campbell), a high school student and a perfect last girl who is harassed by a masked killer in a Halloween costume. The film does a great job of making audiences guess the identity of the abuser, while also overturning expectations. In the momentous reveal, Ghostface is the last seemingly impossible person or people audiences would suspect – a twist that is cleverly replicated and reimagined in the many sequels.


Students of the Faculty

When Robert Rodriguez, the creator of From dusk till dawn, Desperado, and Planet terror, joins Kevin Williamson, the screenwriter behind the majority of iconic ’90s slashers like Scream, scream 2, and I know what you did last summer, the result is a wild, wonderfully bloody, mixed and dark and hilarious roller coaster ride that is Faculty. The film features a superb cast including Josh Hartnett, Salma Hayek, Robert Patrick, Famke Janssen and Elijah Wood, an epic soundtrack, conscious humor, surprisingly impressive effects, and a great ending. It’s a sci-fi horror experience that you don’t want to miss.


The story follows a mismatched group of high school kids who suspect something is wrong with their teachers, only to discover that the faculty has been infected by mean-looking aliens. With the reveal of the Alien Queen’s identity comes an excellent dramatic twist, throwing the film back onto the wonderfully bloody tracks of the monsters in the bloody race to the finish line.


Paul in funny games 1997

The Austrian horror of Michael Haneke’s home invasion (as well as his 2007 American frame-by-frame remake of Tim Roth and Naomi Watts) follows two well-behaved young men who break into a vacation home and take a family hostage, forcing them to play a number of twisted games. The psychological horror film smashes the fourth wall squarely, with one of the killers, Paul, speaking directly to the audience and wondering what would make them keep watching such a sadistic movie.


Funny games is intense, terrifying, disturbing, and asks tough social questions. It also features one of the most disappointing and unexpected ending twists. In a staggering power move, Paul squarely rewinds the scene where the captives finally manage to overwhelm and kill his partner, ruthlessly erasing their small victory and leaving the audience feeling equally helpless.


John Doe, Mills and Somerset in Se7en

David Fincher’s cult horror and crime thriller features a stellar cast that includes Brad Pitt, Morgan Freeman, Gwyneth Paltrow and Kevin Spacey, and follows the story of two LAPD detectives, Somerset and Mills, who track down a killer in series, whose explicit murders are based on the Bible’s Seven Deadly Sins.


Se7en is known for its grim narrative, grim visuals, compelling performances, and incredibly smart and heartbreaking ending. Unlike many other movies, including the aforementioned Scream franchise, Se7en twist isn’t based on the identity of the killer – in fact, he makes it into the final act. Instead, it revolves around the events that follow and the moral and personal revelations of the protagonists. It’s smart, ruthless, and needs to be experienced to be truly appreciated.


Malcolm and Cole in The Sixth Sense

This supernatural psychological horror is the epitome of a surprise ending or what has come to be known as the “Shyamalan Twist”. Directed by Mr Night Shyamalan, the film follows a child psychologist, Malcolm Crowe (Bruce Willis), whose 9-year-old patient Cole Sear (Haley Joel Osment) can see and communicate with the dead. Still haunted by his inability to save his former patient who committed suicide in front of him, Malcolm helps Cole understand and accept his supernatural gift.


The film’s ending comes with an original reveal, which is incredibly well-crafted and beautifully simple. To spoil nothing for those who managed to miss this spectacular ’90s horror masterpiece, suffice it to say that all the pieces of the puzzle come together and the whole narrative is turned upside down in a final cut to rapid fire. It’s really a twist to end all the twists and turns that few (including the director himself) have managed to replicate since.

MORE: 5 Most Anticipated Horror Movies Of 2022


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Are you feeling lucky? | Psychology today http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/are-you-feeling-lucky-psychology-today/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 02:21:54 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/are-you-feeling-lucky-psychology-today/ A scanning electron microscope image showing SARS-CoV-2 (yellow) emerging from the cell surface (blue / pink). Source: Credit: NIAID-RML A lot of Americans, not me, firmly believe that they can control their luck. They are unaware – most are not – that luck, when taken too strongly, is often escorted by greed. The big bet […]]]>

A scanning electron microscope image showing SARS-CoV-2 (yellow) emerging from the cell surface (blue / pink).

Source: Credit: NIAID-RML

A lot of Americans, not me, firmly believe that they can control their luck. They are unaware – most are not – that luck, when taken too strongly, is often escorted by greed. The big bet now is to get or not to get the free Covid vaccine against terrible disease or even death.

Consider this thought experiment: The Angel of Death comes to you with an offer. You have the choice between two unmarked suitcases: one contains $ 1,000, the other $ 200,000. In addition, you have the choice between a guarantee of not getting sick and not dying for the next 10 years or keeping one of the unmarked suitcases. Which option do you take, one of the suitcases or the death exit card?

On December 10, 2007, NBC aired an episode of their hit show Agree or disagree in which Shalanda London, a candidate from Cedar Hill, Texas, received, in essence, the same offer as our thought experiment, with the exception of the death exit card offer. She had the option of raising $ 101,000 (roughly the average between these two extreme amounts) or keeping one of the two unmarked suitcases. With her unyielding feeling that luck was on her side, she turned the deal down and ended up with the suitcase containing $ 1,000.

In her head, she flipped a coin. Each suitcase was identical; nothing favored one choice over the other. She thought – but not quite in those words –Here is $ 101,000. To free. But I’m given an opportunity to almost double that by flipping a coin. If the coin goes heads, I would almost double my money. If it’s tails, I only win $ 1000.

Why wouldn’t she accept the gift of $ 101,000, a profit windfall from a game that even predicts the odds of winning and losing? After all, his life was not at stake.

When the Angel of Death makes a gambling offer involving life, there is always something suspicious behind it. In this case, it tests or studies human behavior. Is greed behind the decision? Or is it a low appreciation of life? The reasons for the choice depend on many things. One would be comparative wealth and utility; for a billionaire, for example, those suitcases might have to contain $ 100 million and $ 2 billion to change their choice. Another would be the happiness of living and a third would be his profile of risky behavior.

Over the past year, several states have offered cash incentives to get the vaccine. New York State offered free scratch lottery tickets with 13 prizes ranging from $ 20 million to $ 5 million, although most were under $ 500. The state is now offering $ 100 in freebies to those who receive a reminder. Other states offered $ 20 gift cards to anyone who got the first shot.

What about money that could balance a choice between $ 20 and life or, in other words, between $ 20 and the peace of mind of being protected from one of the nonliving things? the deadliest in the world?

Consider the following experiment: bring two groups together A and B Random Americans. Group A is fully immunized against the most harmful variant and receives $ 5,000. Group B is not vaccinated. The Angle of Death offers group members A the choice to keep the $ 5,000 and the promise to honor full immunity from death or toss a coin – heads win $ 1,500 and sides lose $ 1,500. At the same time, provide students with B the choice of wagering on a certain win with a promise of full protection from death and a gift of $ 5,000 or flipping a coin – heads wins $ 6,500 and tails $ 3,500. Note: There is no mathematical difference between the two conditions. The odds of winning are the same for both groups.

Psychologists correctly predict that this group A will have a higher percentage of people opting for the raffle. It may sound strange, but the members of the group A will think subliminally, I am already immune to death. If I play there is a 50% chance of winning $ 1,500 and a 50% chance of losing $ 1,500. Group members B mentally counts, If I play, I will win $ 3,500 for sure, plus I have a 50% chance of increasing my winnings from $ 3,500 to $ 6,500. For both groups, the prior gain is greater than the potential loss. Group A Interpret the message in two steps: $ 5,000 is already mine, and there is a chance to win $ 6,500 more. Group B forgot that previous step of winning $ 5,000. The problem therefore arises as a pure bet.

By human behavior and risk management, there are apparent contradictions. Behavior towards risk depends not only on how that risk is perceived, but also on the risk taker’s view on gains and losses. With regard to risky behavior, there seems to be an asymmetry between risk aversion and the risk-seeking for mathematically equivalent choices.

Much of the gambling behavior is based on immediate prior wins or losses. For many, not being infected with Covid-19 is a strong incentive to risk future avoidance with extremely skewed odds. It feels like playing with the free money from the house: I did not contract the Covid, so I must already be immunized. Game choices are not made in historical isolation; they represent the old results of fortune.

Still, it’s a mystery why some habitual social gamers can manage their gaming pleasures while others lose judgment over rational gaming behavior in a thrill-seeking flirtation with danger.


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What UK charity is named after a New York bar? The Saturday Quiz | Life and style http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/what-uk-charity-is-named-after-a-new-york-bar-the-saturday-quiz-life-and-style/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 07:00:00 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/what-uk-charity-is-named-after-a-new-york-bar-the-saturday-quiz-life-and-style/ Questions 1 Which singer-songwriter is known as the “mother of MP3”?2 What is the largest arboreal mammal?3 Sandra Mason is the first president of which country?4 What UK charity is named after a New York bar?5 In global investing, what is a SWF?6 What monarch had a collection of stamps in 325 volumes?seven Which Lloyd […]]]>

Questions

1 Which singer-songwriter is known as the “mother of MP3”?
2 What is the largest arboreal mammal?
3 Sandra Mason is the first president of which country?
4 What UK charity is named after a New York bar?
5 In global investing, what is a SWF?
6 What monarch had a collection of stamps in 325 volumes?
seven Which Lloyd Webber musical has borrowed a title from Elgar?
8 Which race founded the sports newspaper L’Auto?
What links:
9
Abertawe; Caerdydd; Casnewydd; Llanelwy; Tyddewi?
ten Hudson; Crichton; Pennyworth; Carson?
11 Betelgeuse; Peter the great; plague rodents; music, dance etc?
12 Aspartame; isomalt; lactitol; steviol glycoside?
13 Thyssen-Bornemisza; Queen Sofia; Prado?
14 Canton; load; domain; fimbriation; fly, hoist?
15 little Albert; Asch compliance; Stanford Prison; Milgram?

Stuck on the stamp index? Photograph: FlamingPumpkin / Getty Images / iStockphoto

The answers

1 Suzanne Vega (Tom’s Diner was used for the tests).
2 Orangutan.
3 Barbados.
4 Stone wall.
5 Sovereign wealth fund.
6 Georges V.
seven Starlight Express.
8 Tour de France.

Sign up for our Inside Saturday newsletter for an exclusive behind-the-scenes look at the making of the magazine’s biggest articles, as well as a curated list of our weekly highlights.

9 Welsh names of Welsh towns: Swansea; Cardiff; Newport; Saint-Asaph; Saint David.
ten Fictitious butlers: upstairs, downstairs; Admirable Crichton; Batman; Downton Abbey.
11 Anagrams: star; tsar; rats; arts.
12 Artificial sweeteners.
13 Galleries in Madrid’s “art triangle”.
14 Parts of a flag.
15 Famous (or infamous) psychological experiments.


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Understanding the personality traits of the “big five” http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/understanding-the-personality-traits-of-the-big-five/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 18:19:27 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/understanding-the-personality-traits-of-the-big-five/ Contrary to Myers-Briggs type indicator or the Enneagram, you may never have heard of the ‘big five’ personality traits. While the first two have become common self-assessment tools, the Big Five model is primarily used by psychology researchers and human resource professionals. It can, in part, come down to design. Most personality tests are designed […]]]>

Contrary to Myers-Briggs type indicator or the Enneagram, you may never have heard of the ‘big five’ personality traits. While the first two have become common self-assessment tools, the Big Five model is primarily used by psychology researchers and human resource professionals. It can, in part, come down to design. Most personality tests are designed by psychologists to be user-friendly and provide positive insight, but the traits of the Big Five were derived by applying factor analysis to human observations.


Read more: The problem with the Myers-Briggs personality test


“It all arose from the following idea: can you find a taxonomy to describe human personality? Says Stefanie Schurer, human development economist and professor at the University of Sydney. “It was very empirical.” As a result, the model is not always magnanimous towards curious candidates. For example, one of the traits, “neuroticism,” is designed to indicate a person’s predispositions to anxiety and depression.

But the same design features that can steer the masses away from the Big Five also make them particularly useful to researchers. Psychologists have shown that the scores of people on the five traits remain relatively stable in adulthood. And, unlike the Myers-Briggs, scores on the Big Five were correlated with academic performance and professional performance. Despite the model’s relative obscurity in the public eye, researchers are fascinated by its implications six decades after its first iteration.

The big five

  • Openness to experience – This trait describes a person’s tendency to seek new experiences, be open to new ideas, and enjoy aesthetic activities (such as music or art). According to Schurer, this is one of the more uncertain traits when it comes to correlating high or low scores with life outcomes. “We see openness as crystallized intelligence; the kind of intelligence you can learn in a formal education, ”she says. “But this is not always positive. You don’t have a higher salary, for example, and you may be riskier in your sexual behavior.

  • Consciousness – This trait describes a person’s ability to set, work, and achieve goals. Unlike open-mindedness, awareness has been the focus of much research studying the outcomes of life, as it is the trait most correlated with things like academic and professional performance.

  • Extraversion – This trait is probably the most widely recognized measure of personality. Those who score high in extroversion are sociable, energetic, and tend to seek out human interaction. But, like many of the traits of the Big Five, extroversion has many “facets” that fall under its broad umbrella. Schurer explains that a high or low score on this measure can mean very different things depending on those underlying factors. “It has two main components,” she says. “One is dominance and the other is sociability. Some think they should be separated.

  • Pleasantness – This trait is pretty self-explanatory, isn’t it? It measures a person’s tendency to trust and be compassionate with others. Therefore, those who score high on this trait tend to be selfless and concerned about their community.

  • Neuroticism – It’s a trait nobody likes to score points on, although comedians do just that. Neuroticism is defined as a tendency towards negative emotions, including anger, anxiety, and depression. High scores on this measure were correlated with a litany of health problems and even a shortened life expectancy.

Big Five scores tend to stay relatively stable, especially in adulthood, but some traits change over time. And, oftentimes, they change in predictable ways. “A lot of these changes can be explained by your roles and responsibilities throughout life,” says Schurer. “For example, if you have a child, it will change your perspective.”

A historical study outside Australia showed that as subjects got older, gained more responsibility, and relied more on their relational networks, measures of awareness and friendliness also increased. Conversely, the study found that neurosis, extraversion, and openness decreased with age.

The search for an empirical system

In 1879, the German psychologist Wilhelm Wundt founded the first psychological research laboratory, an event that represented the emergence of experimental psychology as a discipline distinct from philosophy. Suddenly aristocrats and academics concerned with the workings of the human mind began to wonder how they could quantify a theory.

As a result of this change, the thoughts and writings of Sir Francis Galton – an eclectic scholar and half-cousin of Charles Darwin – were gripped by a fundamental question: Could an empirical system be devised to classify human dispositions? “The powers of man are finite, and if they are finite, they are not too great to be measured,” Galton wrote in an 1884 essay. “Can we discover character markers to serve as a basis for a survey?” … The character that shapes our conduct is a definite and enduring “something”. “

Galton decided to conduct an experiment within the confines of his library to find out. He dusted off a copy of Roget’s thesaurus and retrieves a long list of English words describing “remarkable aspects of the character” by consulting the index. The thousand words he identified, by his own admission, were of little use; their meanings overlapped in a disorganized and unpredictable way. Before Galton’s view of a system measuring human character empirically can be realized, the list of terms would have to be reduced.

Modern iterations

Although Galton’s writings were dreamy and speculative, his ideas spawned a line of research on which scientists have drawn inspiration throughout the 20th century and to the present day. Over a period of three decades, from the 1930s to the 1960s, a cohort of personality researchers again created a list of words that could be used to describe the human disposition. But this time, they had more tools to identify underlying trends. By analyzing large datasets of people describing their own personalities and that of others, they grouped the tangled web of adjectives into distinct clusters.

“The Big Five was different,” says Schurer. “It was, ‘let’s create a kitchen sink of words, then take the redundancy out until all we have is the gasoline.'”

In 1949, an American psychologist Donald Fiske identified five main personality traits. Researchers replicated and refined Fiske’s work over the following decades, until the traits of the Big Five, as we know them today, emerged from the research of psychologists. Robert McCrae and Paul Costa in the ’80s and’ 90s. They called it the five-factor model, or FFM.

Today, the model is still evolving. Over the past two decades, studies using the Big Five have sometimes included a sixth factor, place of control, which measures the meaning of an individual’s action, or whether they believe their actions can make a difference in life.

Although the model is still evolving, the Big Five validity as a useful framework is well accepted in the scientific community. Schurer says that articles that criticize certain aspects of it aim to polish the model, not to dismantle it. For example, a 2019 study highlighted the biases that often accompany the use of the Big Five across cultures, especially in low-educated developing countries. “At this point, these are just variations,” she says. “It’s fine tuning now.”


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Dear New Zealand, it’s time to end Covid discrimination http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/dear-new-zealand-its-time-to-end-covid-discrimination/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 17:16:05 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/dear-new-zealand-its-time-to-end-covid-discrimination/ Dear New Zealand, It is a shame that as a country we have decided to follow a policy of discrimination. Supporting the creation of a two-tier society is unquestionably immoral. Whatever the reasons, no matter how much they appear now, discrimination is always wrong and is no different from discrimination against people with physical and […]]]>

Dear New Zealand,

It is a shame that as a country we have decided to follow a policy of discrimination. Supporting the creation of a two-tier society is unquestionably immoral. Whatever the reasons, no matter how much they appear now, discrimination is always wrong and is no different from discrimination against people with physical and mental disabilities, those with the “wrong” color of their mind. skin, the ‘wrong’ sexual orientation, the ‘wrong’ ‘religion, the’ wrong ‘sex, and now the’ wrong ‘medical status.

the Lancet recently posted articles like this, COVID-19: the stigma of the unvaccinated is not justified. Interestingly, this article was written by a German who, from my own personal observations, is often very sensitive to broad social discrimination.

Most New Zealanders have relatively stable family backgrounds. I mean, not very violent. For my part, coming from Hungarian Jewish origin, we have twenty-three names on the commemorative panel of the Holocaust museum in Budapest. There are twenty more from our family who were murdered and who are not on this board because their stories have been erased.

Even though it was two generations ago, the impact of these murders and their reasons are still at the forefront of my consciousness. My relatives, through no fault of their own, were also treated like second-class citizens and before the Holocaust in 1944 they had fewer rights than everyone else. Laws were changed to severely restrict the number of Jews allowed to hold academic positions, work in various professions, and hold government positions. Jews were excluded from municipal bodies and many were deprived of the right to vote. Jews have been banned from local spas, markets or the centralized food distribution system in many localities.

All of this was done because people did not have the courage to speak out against this discrimination and stand up for those targeted by it.

The famous psychology experiment conducted at Yale University in 1961, called the Milgram experiment, provided useful insight into why people are still able to do things even though they know their actions cause wrong. It is a very interesting experiment and if you are unfamiliar with it, reading it will be a good use of your time – although some dispute the validity of the experiments. Nonetheless, the main interpretation of the results is shocking and suggests that ordinary people tend to obey orders, even to the point of killing someone, if they believe that authority will accept responsibility for what is happening. When these participants were reminded that they were responsible for their own actions, hardly any of them were prepared to obey.

I would say we are in a similar situation right now.

Most Kiwis cannot stand discrimination. Discrimination policies should therefore not exist. However, there is one here now, denying the unvaccinated Covid the same rights as the vaccinated Covid. The only reason this exists is that the majority of people obey, knowing that discrimination is wrong. This obedience comes from believing that the government will accept responsibility for this discrimination within the mandate. As you know however, governments come and go, times change and history is a very harsh judge for those who support discrimination, especially when recent research shows that those vaccinated against Covid are a significant source of transmission.

Perhaps the deployment of the Covid vaccination by the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare is the one that is more suitable for our country than the current one.

“While we encourage all citizens to get vaccinated against COVID-19, it is neither mandatory nor mandatory. Vaccination will only be given with the consent of the person to be vaccinated after the information provided. Please get vaccinated on your own initiative, understanding both the effectiveness of preventing infectious diseases and the risk of side effects. No vaccination will be given without consent. Please do not force anyone in your workplace or those around you to be vaccinated, and do not discriminate against those who have not been vaccinated. ‘

Covid and the fear that surrounds it will disappear as with the bubonic plague of 1346-53, the Spanish flu of 1918-20, HIV-AIDS from 1981 and the ten other global pandemics that most people don’t even know about . What will be remembered is how people reacted to it and which side they chose.

Unfortunately, we have chosen discrimination and history will not forget it.

Truly,
David Clyne (changed from Klein after WWII)

Do you have something to add ? Join the discussion and comment below.


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How much older is Roselyn Sanchez than her husband Eric Winter? http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/how-much-older-is-roselyn-sanchez-than-her-husband-eric-winter/ Sat, 01 Jan 2022 01:00:29 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/how-much-older-is-roselyn-sanchez-than-her-husband-eric-winter/ Roselyn Sanchez has been married to fellow actor Eric Winter since 2008. Many fans of the couple know they have two children together, but may not be aware of their journey to becoming parents. Here is more about their history as well as how much older the Fantastic island star is that her husband. Roselyn […]]]>

Roselyn Sanchez has been married to fellow actor Eric Winter since 2008. Many fans of the couple know they have two children together, but may not be aware of their journey to becoming parents. Here is more about their history as well as how much older the Fantastic island star is that her husband.

Roselyn Sanchez and Eric Winter on the Red Carpet at the 2020 iHeartRadio Podcast Awards | Jeff Kravitz / FilmMagic for iHeartMedia

The age difference between Sanchez and Winter

Roselyn Milagros Sanchez Rodriguez was born on April 2, 1973 in San Juan, Puerto Rico, to her mother Olga Rodríguez and her father Efraín Sanchez. She is the youngest of four children and the only daughter of her parents.


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A Time Outside This Time by Amitava Kumar’s review – #fakenews onslaught | fiction http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/a-time-outside-this-time-by-amitava-kumars-review-fakenews-onslaught-fiction/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 09:00:00 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/a-time-outside-this-time-by-amitava-kumars-review-fakenews-onslaught-fiction/ HHow should writers react to the noise and fury of the current political moment? With the times frequently producing more spooky and fantastical dramas than even the most gifted novelist could imagine, how can literature compete? The solution proposed by the American journalist, author and professor of Indian origin Amitava Kumar is not to turn […]]]>

HHow should writers react to the noise and fury of the current political moment? With the times frequently producing more spooky and fantastical dramas than even the most gifted novelist could imagine, how can literature compete? The solution proposed by the American journalist, author and professor of Indian origin Amitava Kumar is not to turn away from the daily outrage of the news and #fakenews but to embrace it. By engaging in an “activism of the word”, this scholarly, original and ultimately unsatisfying book intends to oppose the “radical surprise of real life” to the “lies of the rulers”. In this way, Kumar hopes to “preserve the uncomfortable or disturbing truth from the incessant and widespread assault.”

We can be sure what this novel is trying to do, because it keeps telling us. He does this through his narrator Satya, an American journalist, author and professor of Indian origin who attends an artists retreat on an Italian island which “would be where George and Amal Clooney spend their summers”. Satya is working on a novel called The Enemies of the People which, he says, is based on a false story – in fact, “on the many false stories that surround us ”. The plot of A Time Outside This Time, as it stands, includes a collage of newspaper clippings, tweets, and anecdotes that Satya has put together – as well as summaries of psychology articles he has read and read. of the journalism he conducted on the subject of truth and lies. .

Instead of “what used to be called a bourgeois novel” – dismissively glossed over as “the human heart in conflict with itself and so on” – Satya / Kumar serves up a torrent of name and information checks. A future reader would find in this book a sort of time capsule of the Trump years: through it pass not only Donald (and Ivanka) but Hillary Clinton, Sarah Silverman, Anthony Fauci, George Floyd, Narendra Modi, Marina Abramović and Tina Fey (“Oh, Tina Fey“). Here you can learn more about the Dunning-Kruger effect, the Milgram experiment, the marshmallow test, VS Naipaul’s meeting with Ayatollah Khomeini, Gandhi’s contact with the Spanish flu, and the involvement of the father of George Orwell in the opium trade in the Raj. There are more intimate sections, such as flashbacks to Satya’s childhood memories of the anti-Muslim riots in India and descriptions of his newspaper commissions on men and women caught up in the oppressive networks of India. the state. But it is all recounted in the bloodless prose of a Washington Post editorial: “He was dead five years later,” one character reads, “of a heart attack, as he went with him. his wife in a restaurant. It was a sad event.

When, at the start of the book, Satya declares, “to be honest, I thought I had a grip on the truth,” I wondered if his claim to write an anti-bourgeois novel before happy hour in a villa by a lake with the summer Clooney nearby was a devious trick. Perhaps – as one of Kazuo Ishiguro’s short-sighted and emotionless narrators – he would become more and more entangled in his misperceptions and self-deceptions until his worldview was overturned. An early detour, in which he discovers more than appears in the story of a Pakistani migrant trapped by the American police, seems to promise it. But as the novel progresses, the “radical real-life surprise” is increasingly – and surprisingly – absent. Satya is a good husband to a good wife, a research psychologist named Vaani whose only real purpose in the story is to tell him about experimental cognitive studies which he summarizes at length. Later, we find out that she has an ex-husband who hosts a Fox News-type show on Indian TV, conveniently offering Satya the opportunity to lecture against the rise of nationalist bigotry under Modi.

“Any good novel,” Satya reminds us, quoting historian Timothy Snyder, “invigorates our ability to think about ambiguous situations and to judge the intentions of others. But sincerely wanting to dramatize ambiguous situations and the intentions of others is not the same as doing it. In fiction, all the information in the world – whether true or false – does not replace the vivid representation of the character, relationship, interiority, etc.

A Time Outside This Time is published by Picador (£ 14.99). To support the Guardian and Observer, order your copy at guardianbookshop.com. Delivery charges may apply.


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Diners are more likely to eat vegetarian if menu is 75% meatless, study finds http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/diners-are-more-likely-to-eat-vegetarian-if-menu-is-75-meatless-study-finds/ Tue, 28 Dec 2021 12:52:26 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/diners-are-more-likely-to-eat-vegetarian-if-menu-is-75-meatless-study-finds/ By Alexandra Mae Jones Click here for updates on this story TORONTO (CTV Network) – Meat eaters are more likely to choose a vegetarian option over a meal containing meat when dining out if the majority of menu choices are vegetarian, but not if the menu is half -Half, according to a new study. It […]]]>

By Alexandra Mae Jones

Click here for updates on this story

TORONTO (CTV Network) – Meat eaters are more likely to choose a vegetarian option over a meal containing meat when dining out if the majority of menu choices are vegetarian, but not if the menu is half -Half, according to a new study.

It may seem logical that the more vegetarian options there are, the more likely they are to be chosen, but the researchers wanted to test this hypothesis in reality.

Conducted via an online survey, researchers from the UK presented participants with three different hypothetical menus, one of which consisted of 75 percent vegetarian options, one at 50 percent and one with only 25 percent of vegetarian dishes.

They found that meat eaters were three times more likely to choose a vegetarian meal when the menu was 75 percent vegetarian versus 50 percent.

The findings were published online in the February 2022 issue of the peer-reviewed Journal of Environmental Psychology.

Beth Parkin, a senior lecturer at the University of Westminster and one of the study’s authors, said in an article in The Conversation that switching to adding vegetarian meals more often is a way for people to change their behavior to help reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

According to a study published in the journal Nature Food in September, the entire food production system is responsible for 35% of all global emissions, and the production of food of animal origin produces twice as many emissions as the production of plant-based foods.

The new study, which looked at menu choices, said it supported the idea that people can be enticed to eat more vegetarian meals by simply changing the menu, without the need for major education campaigns for them. to convince.

A change in menus and options in restaurants could change attitudes inexpensively and effortlessly, Parkin suggested, noting that vegetarian food is as normal as meals with meat, while providing more variety.

The same researchers also conducted a trial with participants to see if the placement of symbols on a menu that designated a meal as vegetarian – for example, a “V” next to a dish’s title – had an impact on choices. of a client. do. They found that whether the vegetarian symbol was placed to the left or right of the name of the dish had no impact on whether the meal was chosen more often or not.

Note: this content is subject to a strict embargo in the local market. If you share the same market as the contributor of this article, you cannot use it on any platform.

Sonja Puzicsonja.puzic@bellmedia.ca


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In an Anchorage airport washroom in 1969, a man was given a real character test http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/in-an-anchorage-airport-washroom-in-1969-a-man-was-given-a-real-character-test/ Sun, 26 Dec 2021 21:28:04 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/in-an-anchorage-airport-washroom-in-1969-a-man-was-given-a-real-character-test/ Part of a lawsuit weekly series on local history by local historian David Reamer. A question about the history of Anchorage or an idea for a future article? Go to the form at the bottom of this story. Do you remember the cart problem? In the most common version of the scenario, you have the […]]]>

Part of a lawsuit weekly series on local history by local historian David Reamer. A question about the history of Anchorage or an idea for a future article? Go to the form at the bottom of this story.

Do you remember the cart problem? In the most common version of the scenario, you have the power to stop a streetcar from killing multiple people, but only if you hijack the streetcar to kill a single person. For a philosophical conundrum, the cart problem made a significant dent in pop culture and still appears regularly in cultural commentary.

The cart problem has several fundamental flaws. More importantly, the thought experience is functionally meaningless. While often entertaining to ponder, the scenario is too extreme. In a 2014 journal article, Christopher Bauman and his coauthors concluded: “Trolley problems do not engage the same psychological processes as other moral situations. In other words, your choice of cart problem says nothing about your real morals. Killing people with shopping carts is too far removed from everyday reality. Very few people find themselves in the singular control of a situation that could kill several people or a single person.

If you want to analyze your ethical standards and relative morals, the test should reflect a dilemma you might actually encounter. For example, what would you do if you found something valuable, maybe in an airport washroom?

Going to the airport is a routine activity for many Alaskans. Some visits are going well. The lines are short, the security is fast, the plane is on time. We all know how bad a trip to the airport can go, from excruciating waits and weather delays to all the other kinds of inconvenience.

As a frequent traveler, John L. Enicks hoped and probably expected that his July 1969 visit to Anchorage International Airport would be as calm as many. He checked in and headed to the appropriate terminal. Then he stopped at the bathroom – better than getting on the plane – and made a critical mistake. He emptied his pockets.

Maybe he was cleaning a stain. Or maybe he was doing an upstream inventory of his personal items. Perhaps he was distracted by the news, like the Apollo 11 astronauts who had not yet returned to Earth. Enicks never gave a public explanation for what happened that day. Whatever the reason, he left the men’s washroom at Anchorage Airport and boarded his flight. He left behind his wallet and two envelopes.

The wallet contained $ 745. Inside each envelope was $ 1,000. This sum of money is a good sum today. For 1969, that was a shocking amount of money to carry. Adjusting for inflation, $ 2,745 in 1969 is equivalent to about $ 20,700 in 2021 dollars.

The Anchorage Daily Times ran an article on Enicks’ lost money on July 24, 1969. On the same page there was an advertisement for mattresses made in Alaska by Tipton’s Interiors of Spenard. A queen-size mattress and box spring combo cost only $ 119.95 (about $ 900 in 2021). With his lost money, Enicks could have bought 22 sets with the remaining change.

A few pages later, there was an advertisement for Kut Rate Kid, a parcel store at the intersection of Gambell Street and Fireweed Lane. Kut Rate Kid was the original location of the now windmill in Spenard. At $ 3.99 – around $ 30 today – for a fifth, Schenley whiskey was one of the cheaper alcohol options. A case of Budweiser cans was $ 5.99, around $ 45 today. With his lost money, Enicks could have bought 457 cases of Bud.

Affordable housing has been an issue in Anchorage for most of the city’s existence. But 1969 was well after the construction boom after World War II and before prices skyrocketed as oil money started pouring into the city. The classifieds in this same edition of The Times include a downtown two-room house for $ 25,000 (approximately $ 189,000 in 2021), a three-bedroom Spenard house for $ 30,000 (approximately $ 226,500 in 2021). and a Girdwood cottage for only $ 17,500 (approximately $ 132,000 in 2021). Enicks carried an amount with him that would have gone a long way towards a down payment on a property that would be worth much more today than the inflation rate indicates.

An exceptionally honest person quickly discovered the wallet and envelopes. He surely looked inside the wallet, checking to see if there was any ID or if someone had already emptied it. We do not know if he hesitated for a moment. What we do know is that he quickly handed over the whole lot to airport security.

The only identification in the wallet was the name of Enicks, which was paged several times without a response. Airport security official John Hynes checked Enicks’ name against passenger lists for today’s flights. However, Enicks’ Northwest Airlines flight had already taken off.

Hynes then contacted the plane. While still in the air, a flight attendant informed Enicks that his wallet – and money – had been safely recovered. Enicks hadn’t even realized his wallet was missing when he learned of his recovery. A cashier’s check for the full amount was sent to Enicks by registered mail.

For understandable reasons, Enicks did not give an interview or publicly declare his near loss or the reason he was carrying so much cash in the first place. These details could have been interesting but are ultimately secondary to the ethical choice part of the story.

The unidentified man who found the wallet could easily have pocketed the money. It obviously would have taken Enicks hours to notice the missing wallet and envelopes. Money was a big temptation, maybe even a life-changing amount of money.

This brief anecdote raises two points. First, history is like life in that it is littered with both happy and tragic events. Sometimes it’s good to focus on the positive times, the people and things that promote joy, instead of desperation. Second, the choice of the unknown man is a real moral dilemma. What would you have done

• • •

• • •

Key sources:

Bauman, Christopher W., Peter A. McGraw, Daniel M. Bartels, and Caleb Warren. “Revisiting External Validity: Concerns About Cart Problems and Other Sacrificial Dilemmas in Moral Psychology.” Personality and Social Psychology Compass 8, no. 9 (2014): 536-554.

“CPI Inflation Calculator”. United States Bureau of Labor Statistics, bls.gov/data/inflation_calculator.htm.

Kut Rate Kid advertisement. Anchorage Daily Times, July 24, 1969, 5.

“The man didn’t even know he lost $ 2,745.” Anchorage Daily Times, July 24, 1969, 2.

Advertisement for Tipton interiors. Anchorage Daily Times, July 24, 1969, 2.


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Live Covid updates: Omicron news, vaccines and more http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/live-covid-updates-omicron-news-vaccines-and-more/ Fri, 24 Dec 2021 21:09:21 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/live-covid-updates-omicron-news-vaccines-and-more/ PictureTravelers attempted to bypass the disruption on Christmas Eve morning at Kennedy International Airport in Queens.Credit…Dave Sanders for The New York Times Thousands of potential travelers received last-minute cancellations of their Christmas flights on Friday and Saturday due to the recent Omicron case spike, including among airline employees. The number of cancellations worldwide for Christmas […]]]>
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Credit…Dave Sanders for The New York Times

Thousands of potential travelers received last-minute cancellations of their Christmas flights on Friday and Saturday due to the recent Omicron case spike, including among airline employees.

The number of cancellations worldwide for Christmas Eve and Christmas Day stood at more than 3,800, the Flight Aware website showed, including more than 1,000 in the United States. While cancellations represent a relatively small percentage of the roughly 80,000 arrivals on any given day, they have been a shocking disruption in a holiday season overshadowed by the highly transmissible Omicron variant, which now accounts for over 70 percent of new coronavirus cases. in the USA. States.

United Airlines on Friday canceled 176 flights of the 4,000 domestic and international flights scheduled to dozens of airports, mainly due to the call from sick crew members, said Joshua Freed, spokesperson for the Chicago-based carrier. . At least 44 other flights on Saturday have already been canceled, he added.

A spokesperson for Delta Air Lines said it had canceled 158 of the 3,100 flights scheduled for Friday, Christmas Eve, one of the busiest travel days of the year. The Atlanta-based airline was exhausting “all options and resources,” including rerouting and replacing planes and crews to cover scheduled flights.

The cancellations were caused by “A combination of issues, including weather and Omicron-related issues, and Delta expects at least 150 additional cancellations over the weekend,” spokeswoman Kate Modolo said.

Alaska Airlines recorded 17 cancellations on Thursday after a growing number of crew members reported exposure to the virus, but the carrier only needed to cancel nine flights on Friday, according to a spokesperson.

Other airlines, including JetBlue and Allegiant, have followed suit, according to Flight Aware, although American Airlines has said it currently has no flight cancellations.

While most travelers have been able to get to where they’re going, hundreds of people who had anticipated the near-normal first holiday season for years when they booked, scrambled to find alternatives.

Rugs, blankets and pillows littered the floors of Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport on Christmas Eve morning. Impromptu lodgings emptied before sunrise as those who had stayed overnight due to delays and flight cancellations tried to re-let their seats.

Joe Lampkin, a traveler from the Minneapolis area, was waiting near gate D4 early Friday, trying to catch a later morning flight to Seattle, where his family is waiting.

“I hope this one won’t be canceled,” Lampkin said.

At the Atlanta Airport, where Delta is headquartered, a line of about 30 people waited for a help desk in Terminal A, where two Delta employees were trying to sort out problems for passengers whose flights had been flown. been canceled or delayed.

Customers took to social media to voice their grievances over the cancellations.

The United States records nearly 187,000 new cases daily, a 55% increase in the past two weeks, according to the New York Times coronavirus tracker.

Similar problems were occurring around the world when airline staff called for reports of illness or exposure to the virus.

“A large number of our frontline team members are required to test and isolate as close contacts given the increasing number of cases in the general community,” said a representative from Australia-based Jetstar Airways. , which had to cancel around 80 flights.

Staff shortages have affected a range of service industries as the virus continues to spread.

England said this week it is reducing the number of days people have to self-isolate after showing symptoms of Covid-19 to seven days instead of 10 days, a change that officials say could help alleviate shortages. The United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention made a similar decision Thursday, although the change only applies to health workers.



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