Science psychology – Populer Psikoloji http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/ Mon, 11 Oct 2021 12:16:21 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-01T204530.168-150x150.png Science psychology – Populer Psikoloji http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/ 32 32 Abbott to host world congress on therapeutic adherence and behavioral sciences on October 20-21 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/abbott-to-host-world-congress-on-therapeutic-adherence-and-behavioral-sciences-on-october-20-21/ Mon, 11 Oct 2021 12:01:05 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/abbott-to-host-world-congress-on-therapeutic-adherence-and-behavioral-sciences-on-october-20-21/ Experts from all therapeutic areas will share their knowledge, experiences and ideas on adherence Abbott is hosting the first World Congress on Adherence and Behavioral Sciences on October 20-21, 2021. Spearheading the conversation, the organization brings together experts from all therapeutic areas to share their knowledge, experiences and experiences. ideas about adherence. As a prelude […]]]>

Experts from all therapeutic areas will share their knowledge, experiences and ideas on adherence

Abbott is hosting the first World Congress on Adherence and Behavioral Sciences on October 20-21, 2021. Spearheading the conversation, the organization brings together experts from all therapeutic areas to share their knowledge, experiences and experiences. ideas about adherence.

As a prelude to the Congress, an exclusive and virtual knowledge session on ‘Adherence: from treating illnesses to treating people, ‘was addressed by Professor John Weinman of King’s College London, who is widely recognized as one of the founders of modern health psychology. Other distinguished speakers included Dr Sheri Pruitt, clinical psychologist and behavioral science consultant from the United States, and Professor John Piette, professor of behavior and health education and co-director of the Center for Managing Chronic Disease, Ann Arbor, United States. Speakers discussed various components of membership, covering societal and economic impact, the role of behavioral science and the way forward for effective and sustainable membership solutions.

Venu Ambati, Vice President, Pharmaceuticals, Abbott India commented, “We aim to leverage innovative approaches to shift thinking from ‘treating diseases to treating people’. With a: care, we have developed a unique program that reaches out to healthcare professionals, patients and caregivers to improve treatment adherence. Today, we are excited to extend these learnings through the First World Congress on Drug Adherence and Behavioral Sciences. By rethinking what it means to provide care, we can help people take charge of their health. “

Dr Sheri Pruitt, clinical psychologist and behavioral science consultant discussed the links between behavior and adherence, stating: “Adherence is observable and measurable behavior that is usually repeated, such as taking medication or adhering to it. daily exercise. When patients do not follow advice, behavioral science can come up with interventions that help them change their behavior.

Commenting on a: care’s unique approach to addressing the issue of non-adherence, Professor Weinman said, “Being involved in the a: care program has been a great experience because it has been wonderful to see, first hand. main, the great interest and responsiveness it has engendered among physicians in so many countries. “

Professor Piette commented: “Patients need more support for self-management than clinicians and health systems can realistically provide during face-to-face visits. Evidence from around the world has shown that a variety of digital tools can support patients’ efforts to take their medications as prescribed, communicate with healthcare teams about emerging issues, and improve their overall health.


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None of the 2021 Nobel science laureates are women – here’s why men still dominate STEM prizes http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/none-of-the-2021-nobel-science-laureates-are-women-heres-why-men-still-dominate-stem-prizes/ Sun, 10 Oct 2021 05:23:52 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/none-of-the-2021-nobel-science-laureates-are-women-heres-why-men-still-dominate-stem-prizes/ All of the 2021 Nobel Prizes in Science have been awarded to men. It’s back to business as usual after a few good years for the winners. In 2020, Emmanuelle Charpentier and Jennifer Doudna won the chemistry prize for their work on the CRISPR gene editing system, and Andrea Ghez shared the physics prize for […]]]>

All of the 2021 Nobel Prizes in Science have been awarded to men. It’s back to business as usual after a few good years for the winners. In 2020, Emmanuelle Charpentier and Jennifer Doudna won the chemistry prize for their work on the CRISPR gene editing system, and Andrea Ghez shared the physics prize for her discovery of a supermassive black hole. 2019 was another year of all-male winners after biochemical engineer Frances Arnold won in 2018 for chemistry and Donna Strickland received the 2018 Nobel Prize in Physics. Strickland and Ghez were only the third and fourth female physicists. to obtain a Nobel Prize, after Marie Curie in 1903 and Maria Goeppert-Mayer 60 years later. When asked how it felt, Strickland noted that at first it was surprising to realize that so few women had won the award: “But, I mean, I live in a predominantly male world. , so seeing mostly men never really surprises me either. ” The scarcity of Nobel Prize winners raises questions about the exclusion of women from science education and careers and the undervaluation of women’s contributions to science teams. Women researchers have come a long way over the past century, but there is overwhelming evidence that women remain underrepresented in STEM fields of science, technology, engineering, and math. Studies have shown that women who persist in these careers face both explicit and implicit barriers to advancement. Bias are most intense in male dominated fields, where women lack a critical mass of representation and are often seen as symbols or outsiders. This bias is even more intense for transgender women and non-binary individuals. As things improve in terms of equal representation, what is still holding women back in the lab, in leadership, and as laureates? Good News at the Beginning of the Pipeline Traditional stereotypes hold that women “don’t like math” and “aren’t good at science”. Both men and women report these views, but researchers have challenged them empirically. Studies show that girls and women avoid STEM education, not because of cognitive disability, but because of early exposure and experience with STEM, education policy, cultural background , stereotypes and a lack of exposure to role models. Over the past decades, efforts to improve the representation of women in STEM fields have focused on tackling these stereotypes with educational reforms and individual programs that can increase the number of girls entering and remaining in what. the STEM pipeline is called – the path from K -12 to college and postgraduate training.

These approaches work. Women are increasingly likely to express an interest in STEM careers and pursue STEM majors in college. Women now represent half or more of workers in psychology and social sciences and are increasingly represented in the scientific workforce, although computer sciences and mathematics are an exception. According to the American Institute of Physics, women earn about 20 percent of bachelor’s degrees and 18 percent of doctorates in physics, an increase from 1975, when women earned 10 percent of bachelor’s degrees and 5 percent of doctorates in physics. . More and more women are earning a doctorate in STEM and taking up teaching positions. But they encounter cliffs and glass ceilings as they advance in their college careers. What does not work for women Women face several structural and institutional barriers in academic careers in STEM. In addition to issues related to the gender pay gap, the structure of academic science often makes it difficult for women to advance in the workplace and balance their professional and personal commitments. Science in the lab can take years of time spent in a lab. Restrictions in the tenure track process can make it difficult, if not impossible, to maintain a work-life balance, meet family obligations, and have children or take family leave. Additionally, working in male-dominated workplaces can leave women feeling isolated, seen as symbols and vulnerable to harassment. Women are often excluded from networking opportunities and social events, feeling outside the culture of the lab, academic department, and the field. When women do not have a critical mass in the workplace – they make up around 15 percent of workers – they are less empowered to advocate for themselves and are more likely to be seen as a minority group and a exception. When in this minority position, women are more likely to be coerced into accepting additional services as tokens on committees or mentors for female graduate students. With fewer female colleagues, women are less likely to form relationships with female collaborators and support and counseling networks. This isolation can be exacerbated when women are unable to participate in work events or attend conferences due to family or childcare responsibilities, and due to an inability to use research funds for research. reimburse childcare expenses. Universities, professional associations, and federal funders have struggled to overcome a variety of these structural barriers. Efforts include creating family-friendly policies, increasing transparency in salary reporting, enforcing Title IX protections, providing mentoring and support programs for women scientists, protecting research time for women scientists; and targeting women for hiring, research support and advancement. These programs have had mixed results.

For example, research indicates that family-friendly policies such as leave and on-site childcare can exacerbate gender inequalities, leading to increased research productivity for men and educational obligations and increased service for women.

Implicit prejudices about who does science All of us – the general public, the media, university employees, students and professors – have some idea of ​​what a scientist and a Nobel laureate look like. This image is predominantly male, white, and older, which makes sense considering that 96% of Nobel science laureates are male. This is an example of implicit bias: one of the unconscious, involuntary, natural, inevitable assumptions that all of us – men and women – around the world. People make decisions based on unconscious assumptions, preferences and stereotypes – sometimes even when they go against their explicit beliefs. Research shows that an implicit bias against women as academic experts and scientists is pervasive. It manifests itself in valuing, recognizing and rewarding the scholarship of men over the scholarship of women. Implicit biases can hinder women’s hiring, advancement and recognition of their work. For example, women looking for college jobs are more likely to be seen and judged based on their personal information and physical appearance. Letters of recommendation for women are more likely to raise doubts and use language that leads to negative career outcomes. Implicit biases can affect the ability of women to publish the results of their research and gain recognition for their work. Men cite their articles 56% more than women. Known as the “Matilda Effect,” there is a gender gap when it comes to recognition, awards, and citations. Women’s research is less likely to be cited by others, and their ideas are more likely to be attributed to men. Solo research by women takes twice as long to go through the review process. Women are under-represented in journal editors, as researchers and lead authors, and as editors. This marginalization in research control positions runs counter to the promotion of research on women. When a woman becomes a world-class scientist, the implicit biases work against the likelihood that she will be invited as a guest speaker to share her research findings, thus reducing both her visibility on the terrain and the likelihood of her being nominated for awards. This gender imbalance is remarkable for the paucity of female experts cited in reporting on most topics.

Women scientists enjoy less respect and recognition that should accompany their achievements. Research shows that when people talk about male scientists and experts, they are more likely to use their last name and more likely to refer to women by first name. Why is this important? Because experiments show that people referred to by their last name are more likely to be considered famous and eminent. One study found that calling scientists by their last name led people to see them as deserving 14% more of a National Science Foundation career award. Viewing men as winners has been the history of science, but it’s not all bad news. Recent research reveals that in the biomedical sciences, women make big gains by winning more awards, although on average these awards are generally less prestigious and have lower monetary value. Tackling the structural and implicit biases in STEM will hopefully avoid another half-century of waiting for the next woman to receive a Nobel Prize for her contribution to physics. I look forward to the day when a woman receiving the most prestigious award in science will be worthy of interest only for her science and not for her gender.

(This story was not edited by Devdiscourse staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)


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AI improves electronic health record (EHR) systems http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/ai-improves-electronic-health-record-ehr-systems/ Fri, 08 Oct 2021 20:47:09 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/ai-improves-electronic-health-record-ehr-systems/ Source: geralt / pixabay Researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center have teamed up to improve electronic health records (EHRs) with machine learning from artificial intelligence ( IA) and published their results in a recent to study. Automation of patient health […]]]>

Source: geralt / pixabay

Researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center have teamed up to improve electronic health records (EHRs) with machine learning from artificial intelligence ( IA) and published their results in a recent to study.

Automation of patient health records gives hope to clinicians, patients and stakeholders, such as increasing data transfer speed, reducing paper record maintenance costs, increasing efficiency, improving results by avoiding or reducing clinical errors. However, electronic health records have yet to achieve many of these positive benefits and are a major cause of burnout and stress among physicians according to researchers. Clinicians spend time using electronic health records instead of talking with patients.

The global electronic health records market was US $ 26.8 billion in 2020, with North America holding the highest revenue share of 45% according to Grand View Research. The global EHR market is expected to grow at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 3.7% between 2021 and 2028, according to the same report. Leading companies in the EHR market include Epic Systems Corporation, NextGen McKesson Corporation, MEDITECH, Allscripts and Cerner.

Patient health records were largely in paper form until electronic health records (EHRs) first appeared in the 1960s. Electronic health records, also known as electronic medical records (EMRs) , are used in medical settings to electronically store patient information such as medical history, prescriptions, lab test results, x-ray images, demographics, immunization status, billing history and more of data.

Fast forward to modern times and electronic health records have almost completely replaced paper records. Among U.S. office-based physicians, 85.9% use an electronic medical record system, according to figures from the Nation Center for Health Statistics of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

According to the researchers, the process of clinical documentation remains a “tedious, lengthy and error-prone process.” Scientists cite how this is especially the case in emergency rooms, where clinicians can see up to thirty-five patients during a shift, forcing them to quickly absorb the contents of the medical history. patients from “multifaceted requirements and fragmented interfaces for exploring and documenting information” that are often new to them before creating an informed diagnosis and focused care plan.

Although EHRs offer vast improvements in speeding up access and retrieval of patient records, documentation systems can be time consuming and cumbersome for clinicians to use.

“To better support this synthesis of information, clinical documentation tools must allow rapid contextual access to the patient’s medical record,” write the researchers.

To solve these problems with electronic health records, researchers at MIT CSAIL created a machine learning system called MedKnowts and implemented it at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, Massachusetts. The AI-backed EHR system integrates the information retrieval system with a note-taking editor so that the search is efficient. The system enables clinicians to use natural language and automates the entry of structured data. Documentation is streamlined with features like autofill text, proactive information retrieval, and easy parsing of long notes.

According to the study, the average score on the scale for using the system by scribes was 83.75 out of a possible 100. Researchers report that scribes found their AI-based system easy to learn and use, and would use it frequently.

With this new proof of concept, the researchers plan to further improve AI machine learning to identify the part of a patient’s health record that is most relevant for the clinician to focus on reading. The researchers plan to incorporate contributions from clinicians, such as medical terminology, in the future so that the system adapts over time. In the next steps, the team is exploring the possibility of commercializing AI machine learning technology in the future.

Copyright © 2021 Cami Rosso All rights reserved.


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How to deal with climate anxiety, according to psychologists http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/how-to-deal-with-climate-anxiety-according-to-psychologists/ Thu, 07 Oct 2021 14:03:04 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/how-to-deal-with-climate-anxiety-according-to-psychologists/ You don’t have to look too closely to know that climate change is one of the dominant – and most anxiety-provoking – stories in our lives. This summer, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) released a landmark report detailing the terrible future of the planet, one that United Nations Secretary-General António Guterres called “a […]]]>

You don’t have to look too closely to know that climate change is one of the dominant – and most anxiety-provoking – stories in our lives. This summer, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) released a landmark report detailing the terrible future of the planet, one that United Nations Secretary-General António Guterres called “a code red for humanity.”

Without immediate and drastic action, it is unlikely that we can avoid a warming of 1.5 degrees Celsius over the next 20 years, a so-called climate tipping point that will cause irreversible impacts on our planet. weather situation, food supply and health. Young people expected to experience an “unprecedented” number of natural disasters, according to a study by the journal Science. Simply put, climate change may seem like an impossible load to carry.

This thing you might be feeling right now is called “climate anxiety” – the fear and stress of the climate crisis – and it’s a growing phenomenon, explains. Thomas doherty, a psychologist specializing in an environmental approach to therapy at Sustainable Self in Portland, OR.

There are practical and helpful ways to confront and calm him down, says licensed psychologist David H. Rosmarin, Ph.D., assistant professor of psychology at Harvard Medical School and founder of the Center for Anxiety. And working to resolve eco-anxiety can also help us overcome other forms of anxiety that we face every day, Doherty notes. Here’s how to fight climate anxiety, according to experts.

1. Focus on the present

The greatest risks to humanity are not immediate, but long term, explains Rosmarin. The IPCC report is written in urgent language designed to stimulate action by world leaders; it does not say, however, that we must prepare for the end of the world.

So remember that even in the worst-case scenario, it will take us two decades to reach that climate tipping point – urgent, yes, but a time frame that we can work with. When you’re obsessed with how the environment might crumble over the next few years, Rosmarin recommends trying to retreat. “Being aware and taking reasonable action against a distant risk is good, but being concerned is usually not productive,” he notes. At such times, take a walk, write down your thoughts, or do something else that calms you down and helps you refocus on the present. it will only make you more anxious.

This strategy is not perfect — some people are already living with the effects of climate change (such as those who breathe forest fire smoke in the West), and many people are refuse to have children because of fears for the future. But it’s worth it, Rosmarin says, if you’re caught in vague and overwhelming ecological anxiety.

2. Remember you can live with anxiety

“Anxiety is a normal, healthy emotion,” Doherty says. At a basic level, anxiety is “fear shrouded in a cloud of uncertainty”. It happens when we are faced with a situation that may or may not threaten us – and he describes it as useful because it prompts us to step into that cloud and take action to protect ourselves. “It’s normal for people to feel anxious about climate change or disruption because it has so many potential threats,” Doherty explains.

But as with others prolonged stressors like, say, chronic disease, divorce, or a pandemic, you can go on living – even thrive – with the anxiety it causes, Rosmarin says. “Such anxieties don’t need to take hold of life,” he explains.

Rosmarin remembers a patient who worried about her health in the same way many others worried about the environment; it is natural to worry about the big issues that are affecting you. He encouraged her not to try to push aside her anxiety, but to learn to live her life by his side. “She noticed that it was very empowering to think that she didn’t need to let go of her anxiety to have a happy life,” he says.

“Anxiety is a normal, healthy emotion.”

So don’t immediately try to bury your anxiety about the environment; delve into this so-called cloud, Doherty recommends, and find out what you can do to tackle climate change in your life. This way, your anxiety will help you build something positive, instead of turning your head and focusing on the negatives.

3. Pay attention to your other emotions

It’s easy to get caught up in a whirlwind of sad, scared thoughts about the surroundings. But eco-anxiety, by its very nature, comes from loving the world around us. “I try to get people to have a 360-degree view of emotions in general, as well as the environment, so that we’re not limited to a few different emotions,” Doherty explains.

“Once you start opening that up, you develop more of the ability to deal with your anxiety,” he says. “People realize that they have more emotions in it, such as hope, curiosity, empowerment or compassion. Once we activate many emotional channels, this anxiety has a better context. “

While this can apply to any anxiety, it applies particularly well to climate change. Reconnect with why you love nature in the first place, especially when going out (which has mental health benefits in itself), can help you associate your negative thoughts with wonderful thoughts.

4. Develop an environmental identity

Many new to eco-anxiety aren’t environmental experts, Doherty says, so he recommends exploring climate issues to create what he calls an “environmental identity.” It is based on your values, your connection to nature, life events and research, the same way people come to understand their gender or cultural identity, he notes. With a firm grip on it, anxiety is much more manageable and personal growth is more likely.

You can use this identity to channel your anxiety into action, whether it’s pressuring your elected officials or your bosses to adopt. greener practices or volunteer with an environmental organization. But you have no mandate to do these things, Doherty. After all, no one can do it all on their own; pace yourself to avoid burnout.

5. Ask for help if you have any problems

Confiding in someone you trust is necessary for all of us, says Rosmarin, whether it’s a loved one, family member or professional. Sharing anxieties, he notes, can help strengthen the bonds between us, leading to happier and more fulfilling lives in general. Plus, verbalizing your thoughts can help you understand them better.

This is an especially important step if you are truly struggling with climate anxiety. “People who cannot think or focus on other things are likely to suffer from an anxiety disorder,” Rosmarin cautions. “If someone can’t control their worries, if they feel like they can’t stop worrying, it’s worth having a conversation with a mental health professional.

Doherty agrees, saying that while “most people” will experience some form of climate anxiety, a smaller group suffers from climate anxiety disorder that requires professional help. (Finding the right one can be difficult, but this guide is a great place to start.) There is a new contingent of psychologists and therapists identified as climatologists like Doherty, but it is not completely necessary to contact one, he notes.

“Thinking of this as a normal 21st century situation is helpful,” Doherty says. “Any good therapist can help people manage their anxiety. “

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Overview of the elections: Anacortes Town Council | Elections http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/overview-of-the-elections-anacortes-town-council-elections/ Thu, 07 Oct 2021 01:00:00 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/overview-of-the-elections-anacortes-town-council-elections/ Country united states of americaUS Virgin IslandsMinor Outlying Islands of the United StatesCanadaMexico, United Mexican StatesBahamas, Commonwealth ofCuba, Republic ofDominican RepublicHaiti, Republic ofJamaicaAfghanistanAlbania, People’s Socialist Republic ofAlgeria, People’s Democratic Republic ofAmerican SamoaAndorra, Principality ofAngola, Republic ofAnguillaAntarctica (the territory south of 60 degrees S)Antigua and BarbudaArgentina, Argentine RepublicArmeniaArubaAustralia, Commonwealth ofAustria, Republic ofAzerbaijan, Republic ofBahrain, Kingdom ofBangladesh, […]]]>


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What the names of Irish children say about us http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/what-the-names-of-irish-children-say-about-us/ Wed, 06 Oct 2021 11:33:34 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/what-the-names-of-irish-children-say-about-us/ Analysis: The strongest indicator that a couple had a large family was whether they chose traditional and common names for their children Through Dylan connor, Arizona State University As you walk down a busy Dublin street, imagine walking past a young boy and girl perched in a stroller. Today, those kids might have names like […]]]>

Analysis: The strongest indicator that a couple had a large family was whether they chose traditional and common names for their children

Through Dylan connor, Arizona State University

As you walk down a busy Dublin street, imagine walking past a young boy and girl perched in a stroller. Today, those kids might have names like Emily and Noah, two of the most popular names among parents last year. If you had walked the same street in 2008, it could have been Chloe and Ryan. Maybe it was Brian and Laura in 1980, James and Margaret in the 1960s, or John and Mary in the 1920s. While each name has its own story, each generation has a set of names that seem distinctive from the previous one.

The social sciences reveal that these names open windows on our psychology. Recent studies on naming provide information on topics as broad as immigration economics, African American health, admission to elite universities and even the size of Irish families. While parents have long been concerned about how their children’s names will be perceived by others, social scientists are concerned about what children’s names tell us about their parents.

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From RTÉ’s Nine News, Jack and Grace were the best baby names for 2020

In a recent study, we turned the analysis of names to one of Ireland’s great historical questions: Why were the Irish so reluctant to follow couples elsewhere in downsizing their families? While the average number of live births per married woman in Britain fell from six in 1860 to just two in 1940, Ireland has taken many decades to catch up. The Church’s ban on contraception provides an explanation, but is ultimately unsatisfactory when we recall that generations of couples have delayed motherhood without contraceptives.

In search of a more comprehensive answer, we have used statistics and data science in millions of historical documents on families in Ireland and the United States. Our modeling procedure focused on accurately identifying couples who were raising smaller families. Our reasoning was that by knowing who was limiting their family size, we could get clues as to why. With our goals set on isolation from the strongest influences, we looked at everything from occupation and education to religion and location.

We found something surprising. Many of our earlier expectations were confirmed: professionals had fewer children than workers, families were smaller in cities, and Catholics had more children than Protestants. The strongest indicator that a couple had a large family, however, was whether or not they chose traditional and common names for their children. When parents choose names like Patrick, Mary, and John, they usually have more children. Parents with fewer children relied more on unusual names like Eric, Sam, Hazel, and Irene. Regardless of religion, the denomination was tied to family size and the pattern even applied to the Irish in America.

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From RTÉ archives, Flor McCarthy reports for RTÉ News how Conor and Chloe were the most popular baby names of 1998.

Irish couples were particularly likely to counter trends as they were exposed to cities. Urban couples were not only the first to sharply reduce childbearing, but were also more likely to experiment with new and unusual names. It was a radical departure from the large rural Irish families, where successive generations were named after parents, grandparents, aunts, uncles and cousins. Whether they know it or not, these townspeople were innovators in reimagining the Irish family.

Names speak to us about ourselves because they provide windows into how we think about our children. When we choose names, we are inadvertently expressing who we want ourselves and our children to be, and how we expect names to bear in the future. These early Irish innovators led a shifting mindset, a departure from a world structured around continuity in land, children and surnames. The new world was one of the most individualized aspirations of children, and the names that go with them. Names reflect our goals and aspirations because, in a sense, we imagine the future through the way we name our children.

So what do the names of our children tell us today? Consider the simple statistic of how many Irish children have been given one of the 20 most popular baby names in any given year. In 1900, 7 out of 10 Irish children were given one of the top 20 names. That number fell to 6 in 10 in the 1960s, 4 in 10 in 2000, and was down to 2 in 10 in 2020, signaling a steady growth in name diversity. Our shrinking families and their individual names – processes set in motion by these early innovators – allude to our deepening vision of our children as unique, dare we say precious.

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In RTÉ’s Doc On One, One Hundred Years of Names Goes Behind Top 100 Irish Baby Names Lists, Uncovering A Fascinating Portrayal Of A Changing Country

At the same time, we rejected the names of an older Ireland. Married, the most popular Irish given name of the 20th century, hasn’t made it to the top 10 most popular names since 1989 and hit an all-time low at the 93rd in 2019. Away from traditional names like Mary, we’ve adopted globally popular names like Emily and Amelia, and locally rooted but refreshing names like Finn, Liam and Fiadh.

Ireland’s favorite new names capture our imaginations as outward-looking members of a fresher and more modern Ireland. While each name has its own story, our collective choices still have a lot to say about where we started and where we see ourselves going.

Dr Dylan Connor is an Assistant Professor in the School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning at Arizona State University.


The opinions expressed here are those of the author and do not represent or reflect the views of RTÉ




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One in three children with food allergies report being bullied because of their condition http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/one-in-three-children-with-food-allergies-report-being-bullied-because-of-their-condition/ Wed, 06 Oct 2021 00:31:47 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/one-in-three-children-with-food-allergies-report-being-bullied-because-of-their-condition/ Living with a food allergy can have a huge impact on a child’s daily life, whether it’s limiting their participation in social activities or being treated differently by their peers. While previous research indicates that many children are bullied over food allergies, a new study in the Journal of Pediatric Psychology found that offering children […]]]>

Living with a food allergy can have a huge impact on a child’s daily life, whether it’s limiting their participation in social activities or being treated differently by their peers. While previous research indicates that many children are bullied over food allergies, a new study in the Journal of Pediatric Psychology found that offering children with food allergies a multi-item assessment provides a more accurate picture of the magnitude and extent of the problem.

When asked a simple “yes” or “no” question about food allergy bullying, 17% of children said they had been bullied, teased or harassed about their food allergy. But when asked to respond to a multi-item list of victimizing behaviors, that number rose to 31%. What’s more, researchers at Children’s National Hospital found that only 12% of parents said they were aware of it. Reported bullying ranged from teasing or verbal criticism to more overt acts such as an allergen being waved in their face or intentionally put in their food. Researchers say it is essential to identify accurate assessment methods for this problem so that children can get the help they need.

“Bullying related to food allergies can have a negative impact on a child’s quality of life. Using a more comprehensive assessment, we found that children with food allergies were bullied more than originally reported and parents may be in the dark about it, ”explains Linda Herbert, Ph.D., Director of the Clinical and Psychosocial Research Program in the Division of Allergy and Immunology at Children’s National and one of the researchers in the study.

“The results of this study demonstrate the need for more food allergy education and awareness of food allergy harassment in communities and schools where food allergy harassment is most likely to occur.” produce, ”adds Herbert.

The study examined food allergy-related harassment among a diverse patient population and assessed parent-child disagreement and methods of assessing harassment. It included 121 children and 121 primary caregivers who completed questionnaires. The children were aged 9 to 15 and were diagnosed by an allergist with at least one of the eight major IgE-mediated food allergies – peanuts, tree nuts, cow’s milk, egg, wheat, soy, shellfish, and fish.

Of the 41 youth who reported being bullied over food allergies:

  • 51% said they had experienced overt physical acts such as an allergen being addressed to their face, thrown at them or intentionally put in their food.
  • 66% reported experiences of bullying that are categorized as overt acts of non-physical victimization, including verbal teasing, remarks or criticism about their allergy, and verbal threats or bullying.
  • Eight reported relationship bullying, such as spreading rumors of people talking behind their backs and being intentionally ignored or excluded due to their food allergy.

The researchers also note that food allergy bullies included, but were not limited to, classmates and other students, and the bullying most often occurred in school.

The authors found that only 12% of parents said their child had been bullied because of their food allergy and of these, 93% said their child had reported bullying to them. Some parents said they made fun of themselves or laughed at themselves because of concerns about their child’s food allergy.

“It’s important to find ways for children to open up about bullying related to food allergies,” Herbert said. “Asking additional specific questions about peer experiences during clinic appointments will hopefully help children and caregivers get the help and support they need. “

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Materials provided by National Children’s Hospital. Note: Content can be changed for style and length.


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100 students, 100% of whom apply for 20 places at the DU college; 99 from Kerala http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/100-students-100-of-whom-apply-for-20-places-at-the-du-college-99-from-kerala/ Tue, 05 Oct 2021 06:00:15 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/100-students-100-of-whom-apply-for-20-places-at-the-du-college-99-from-kerala/ Of the ten programs offered by the University of Delhi, the BA (Hons) in Political Science is the one that requires a 100 percent cut-off for unreserved places. Delhi University received over 30,000 applications on the first day of admissions opening. Photo file. Hindu College received more than a hundred applications for its Honors BA […]]]>

Of the ten programs offered by the University of Delhi, the BA (Hons) in Political Science is the one that requires a 100 percent cut-off for unreserved places.

Delhi University received over 30,000 applications on the first day of admissions opening. Photo file.

Hindu College received more than a hundred applications for its Honors BA in Political Science on Monday, October 5 at 5 p.m. All applicants have a score of 100 percent, and all but one are from Kerala.

The college has a total of 20 places in the first year in this course, and the University of Delhi, which began admissions on Monday, cannot under the rules refuse the application of students who meet this criterion. exclusion.

On the first day of accepting applications, the DU approved over 2,200 applications. A large number of candidates who obtained one percent came from the Kerala State Board. Of the ten programs offered by the DU, the BA (Hons) in Political Science is the one that requires a 100 percent cut-off for unreserved places.

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A faculty in the political science department said it received applications from 33 unqualified applicants, 62 OBCs, 4 SCs and 3 EWSs. The nominations are “either in the process of being approved or in the process of being approved,” the faculty member said.

The official added, “Because all of these students meet the general threshold, they will all be considered general admissions and the number of places reserved will need to be increased proportionately. The problem of our institutions and classrooms being stretched beyond their capacity, with skewed student-teacher ratios, will continue. “

Read also: The AU publishes an award list, 100% cut-off in computer science, psychology

Miranda House does not require a 100 percent cut for any program, the highest it gets is a 99.75 percent cut in political science. Director Bijayalaxmi Nanda said that the political science program received 20 applications which got 100% perfect score and again came from the Kerala board.

Meanwhile, SGTB Khalsa College has not received any applications for its BCom program, which also has a 100% high selection criteria for its first list. Director Jaswinder Singh said: “The cut will go down a bit in the next list.” The college approved 60 of the 110 applications received on day one.

Ramjas College also has a general threshold of 100% for the first list of BA political science (Hons) and BSc physics (Hons) courses. They have approved 50 admissions to date, 90 percent of which are in reserved categories.

The admissions process which started yesterday was put on hold for a few hours as some state boards included both grades 11 and 12 in the scoring sheets. Later it was decided to consider only class 12 marks. Of the 30,554 requests received by the DU, 2,286 of them were approved and 795 paid their fees by 7pm yesterday.


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The social costs of seeking loneliness http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/the-social-costs-of-seeking-loneliness/ Mon, 04 Oct 2021 12:57:56 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/the-social-costs-of-seeking-loneliness/ In 2014, an article published in Science found that many people would rather experience a painful electric shock than be left alone with their own thoughts (Wilson et al., 2014). But this does not apply to everyone. People differ in the extent to which they tolerate (and even enjoy) spending time alone. While some people […]]]>

In 2014, an article published in Science found that many people would rather experience a painful electric shock than be left alone with their own thoughts (Wilson et al., 2014). But this does not apply to everyone. People differ in the extent to which they tolerate (and even enjoy) spending time alone.

While some people find loneliness painful and boring, others find loneliness enjoyable and interesting. But those who enjoy seclusion – those of us who prefer a quiet evening at home to a night with friends in a noisy bar – are often treated as outliers in modern life. In our research, we found that there can be negative social consequences for people seeking loneliness.

People differ in the way they like solitary activities.

Source: ryanniel-masucol-1503495 / Pexels

In a new paper, led by Dr Dongning Ren, we conducted a series of studies to study how people judge and act towards those who enjoy loneliness (Ren & Evans, 2021). We have found that people are more likely to ostracize people who enjoy loneliness. In other words, people seeking solitude are more likely to be excluded from groups and teams. This happens because people assume that everyone involved (both the excluded and the excluded) will be better off if the solitude seekers are left on their own. But ostracism can be a dangerous thing, even for people who like to spend time alone. And that means people seeking solitude face additional challenges at work and in life.

Leave me out of this

When we first meet someone, we form an impression of that person and use that impression to judge what activities they might enjoy and how we should treat them. In our studies, we looked at how people judge (and treat) those who enjoy loneliness. If someone is seen as a loneliness seeker (the kind of person who enjoys spending time alone), people make a lot of assumptions based on this information. They assume that solitude seekers don’t care much about belonging to groups; that they are unpleasant and difficult to live with; and they are, to put it bluntly, no warm. Above all, these negative impressions have consequences. People are more likely to exclude and avoid interacting with those seeking solitude.

It’s easier for everyone that way

Why do people exclude those seeking solitude? We found that two beliefs helped explain our results.

  • First, self-interest: people believe that it would be difficult or unpleasant to spend time with people seeking solitude. When we exclude those seeking solitude, we make it easier for ourselves by avoiding potentially awkward social situations.
  • Second, the loneliness seeker’s concern: People believe that loneliness seekers actually don’t want to be included and that they wouldn’t enjoy interacting with others. When we exclude those seeking solitude, to some extent we might think that we are doing them a favor.

The problem is, these beliefs, especially the idea that people seeking loneliness want to be excluded, are probably wrong.

Everyone is suffering

People assume that those seeking solitude are immune to the pain of social exclusion. We assume they don’t want to join our parties or work with us on new projects. But almost everyone doesn’t like to be left out. Even subtle forms of exclusion, such as being snubbed by an anonymous stranger in a lab experiment, can elicit a strong emotional response (Wesselmann et al., 2012). While we haven’t tested this directly in our studies, our hunch is that even die-hard lonely seekers would react negatively to exclusion.

When we learn about the personality traits of others, it is quite natural to try to predict what they will appreciate and how they wish to be treated. The problem is, it’s hard to make predictions about people, especially when you’re trying to predict the reactions of someone you don’t know well. You should think twice before socially excluding those seeking solitude.

They might be happy to be invited to your next party (or to work with you on your next project), and you might be happy to have them join them.


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People who have suffered in the past are more likely to be praised for their good deeds in the future: study http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/people-who-have-suffered-in-the-past-are-more-likely-to-be-praised-for-their-good-deeds-in-the-future-study/ Sun, 03 Oct 2021 16:23:47 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/people-who-have-suffered-in-the-past-are-more-likely-to-be-praised-for-their-good-deeds-in-the-future-study/ A team of researchers from the University of Missouri found that people tend to praise someone for good deeds as an adult after finding out that this person also had to overcome adversity or suffering earlier in the day. life, such as child abuse and neglect. The results of the study were published in the […]]]>

A team of researchers from the University of Missouri found that people tend to praise someone for good deeds as an adult after finding out that this person also had to overcome adversity or suffering earlier in the day. life, such as child abuse and neglect. The results of the study were published in the ‘Journal of Experimental Social Psychology’.

Philip Robbins, associate professor and chair of the philosophy department at MU College of Arts and Science, said the findings may help narrow a knowledge gap found in both psychology and philosophy, two disciplines that study human behavior. “Historically, psychology and philosophy have focused more on the ‘dark’ side of human behavior, such as moral wrongdoing, and less attention has been paid to studying the ‘light’ side of human behavior, such as acts of altruism, ”said Robbins, the project’s principal investigator.

“This research aims to better understand a relatively neglected aspect of human psychology, the human mind, and the human condition, which concerns how people process and respond to positive behaviors, such as praising,” added Robbins. The research is based on the results of a survey of a total of 974 participants. It builds on the researchers’ previous conclusion that people tend to think that an adult who has committed a crime is less guilty and deserves less punishment when told that the accused has suffered serious harm in the process. his childhood.

Robbins said the team’s findings are also relevant for thinking about criminal convictions, especially in capital punishment trials. Defense counsel often present evidence of suffering and victimization of clients in their early years, and previous and current studies by the authors support this practice. He added that the findings point to a broader issue with how people judge others without knowing who they really are as individuals, because knowing what a person has been through in life can change the way we do. let us evaluate his good deeds and his bad deeds.

“It is important that we pay attention to human beings not only as creatures that harm one another, but also as creatures that do good for one another,” Robbins said. “Part of what’s remarkable about our species is our ability to behave in prosocial ways, like cooperating and helping others, as well as antisocial ways, like competing and harming them,” Robbins concluded. . (ANI)

(This story was not edited by Devdiscourse staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)


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