Science psychology – Populer Psikoloji http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 14:03:26 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-01T204530.168-150x150.png Science psychology – Populer Psikoloji http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/ 32 32 Talogy launches modular assessment solutions, offering first-of-its-kind configurability in the market http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/talogy-launches-modular-assessment-solutions-offering-first-of-its-kind-configurability-in-the-market/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 12:53:00 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/talogy-launches-modular-assessment-solutions-offering-first-of-its-kind-configurability-in-the-market/ Customers can continue to leverage Talogy’s 75 years of data experience and scientific expertise in a new and improved way that combines powerful technology with science-based evaluation principles to bring efficiency and efficiency in the hiring process without sacrificing integrity. GLENDALE, CA., June 28, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Unlimited combinations of curated assessment modules that test […]]]>

Customers can continue to leverage Talogy’s 75 years of data experience and scientific expertise in a new and improved way that combines powerful technology with science-based evaluation principles to bring efficiency and efficiency in the hiring process without sacrificing integrity.

GLENDALE, CA., June 28, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Unlimited combinations of curated assessment modules that test specific skills with brilliant digital experiences and the fastest implementation time on the market, while keeping science and data at the heart – it’s Is Talogy’s new end-to-end configurable assessment solutions bring to the table.

Backed by more than ten million data points, 75 years of scientific talent assessment research, and a clear understanding of client needs, Talogy’s configurable talent management technology offers uniquely designed solutions for address unique customer talent challenges.

Using Talogy’s modular technology, organizations can create the perfect assessment journey focused on what’s most important to the job, removing irrelevant or redundant constructs.

Key Benefits:

  • Configurable. Talogy will tailor the assessment specifically to clients’ unique hiring and development needs and can reconfigure the assessment in days to meet the changing demands of the dynamic job market, such as changes in the number of applicants, required skills and the motivations of the candidates.
  • Saving data. Science and validity remain front and center even when uniquely configured for clients, an essential feature not previously seen in configurable assessments.
  • Quick. Candidate workflows integrate with existing applicant tracking systems and implementation takes as little as two days.
  • Efficient. Provides a seamless experience for applicants and provides an effective recruiting experience without reducing the personalized feel that engages participants.
  • Engaging. The modern, mobile-first design works on any device allowing for a variety of assessments, simulations, and job previews while focusing only on the essentials for the high-face-validity role.
  • Predictive, consistent and fair. Flexible digital reports simplify decision-making by sifting through data and identifying critical information.

“Talogy’s modular solutions meet the ever-changing demands of assessment users for job-relevant content, delivered with speed and flexibility, while dramatically improving candidate engagement through modern, mobile experiences. innovative combination of science and technology enables clients to solve a wide range of employment issues and development challenges, and to do so on an ongoing basis,” said Celestial StoneGlobal President of Talogy.

“We couldn’t be more excited to bring the first truly configurable, valid, and accurate modular assessment experience to the market.”

Learn more here.

About Talogy

We are Talogy. Talent management experts. We design solutions that screen, select, develop and engage talent worldwide. Bringing together leading psychologists, data scientists, developers, and HR consultants, we bring together the power of psychology and technology so you can make the best decisions based on data. With over 30 million assessments conducted each year in more than 50 languages, we help our clients discover organizational excellence.




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Depression can prevent people from accepting positive feedback http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/depression-can-prevent-people-from-accepting-positive-feedback/ Sun, 26 Jun 2022 21:46:09 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/depression-can-prevent-people-from-accepting-positive-feedback/ Source: Pexels/FreestocksOrg Those who are depressed tend to hold negative beliefs about themselves. According to cognitive models of depression, these beliefs are often out of step with reality. For example, someone with depression might think, “Nobody really cares about me,” even though they have friends or family members who clearly think so. People with depression […]]]>

Source: Pexels/FreestocksOrg

Those who are depressed tend to hold negative beliefs about themselves. According to cognitive models of depression, these beliefs are often out of step with reality. For example, someone with depression might think, “Nobody really cares about me,” even though they have friends or family members who clearly think so.

People with depression also tend to make overly negative predictions about how things will turn out. They assume that social interactions will be awkward, job interviews won’t lead to offers, and romantic overtures will lead to rejection.

Researchers have suggested that depressed people find it difficult to “update their beliefs” in the face of positive feedback. In other words, a depressed person might expect a job interview to go badly because they don’t believe they are competent. And if they’re offered the job, they might think, “I guess I really cheated the interviewer.” In other words, they fail to use the positive result to update their beliefs about their own competence. New search published in the journal Clinical Psychological Sciences examined whether people with symptoms of depression might view positive feedback about their own performance as less valid, preventing them from using this information to positively update their beliefs about their abilities.

This new research focused on a phenomenon called “cognitive immunization.” Just as a vaccine can make your body less “open” to infection, cognitive immunization can make your beliefs less open to change. The problem is that while we want our bodies to stop infections, we don’t want our brains to stop new evidence.

Imagine two different characters. Sad Sam struggles with depression; Content Chris does not. Sam and Chris both decide they want to learn computer programming and so they sign up for a coding class. Sam and Chris do well on the first assignment and get these comments from the teacher: Great job on your exam! You really seem to have a knack for writing code.

What kinds of thoughts will Sam and Chris have in response to these comments? According to the cognitive immunization approach, it might look like this.

  • Cris: Cool. I guess I’m better at it than I thought I was. Maybe I should consider taking more computer classes.
  • Sat : I guess this mission was really easy if I did it right. Or probably the teacher is just encouraging and telling everyone he did well.

What’s going on here? Chris incorporates the positive feedback into his sense of his own abilities. Sam decides that the positive feedback can’t be valid, so it doesn’t really change his view of his own abilities.

For this new research, the authors recruited people with a wide range of scores on the Beck Depression Inventory, a common self-report measure of depression. Research participants were told that the study would require them to take a test that was very difficult and designed “to be solved correctly by only a few people”.

Before taking this difficult test, participants first predicted how well they would do, by answering questions such as “I will be successful at working on the test tasks”. After taking the test, participants received feedback on their scores.

This is where it gets interesting: Participants were randomly assigned to receive one of three types of mock feedback, regardless of their actual performance. In one condition, participants were told that they scored in the top 50% of all participants; in the second condition, participants were told that they were among the top 10% performers; in the third condition, participants were told that they were among the top 1% scorers. After these comments, participants completed a measure designed to take advantage of “cognitive vaccination”. To this extent, participants indicated whether they trusted the feedback they got about their performance and whether they thought their performance on the test was an exception to their overall level. Finally, participants indicated to what extent they thought they could perform such tasks in the future.

As expected, compared to people with low levels of depression symptoms, people with depression generally believed that they would not perform as well on the difficult test. If we stick to our example above, the researchers basically found that someone like Sam would be inclined to think, “If this is a really hard test, I probably won’t do very well.”

But what happened when participants received positive feedback on their performance? Study results showed that participants with higher scores on the Depression Inventory believed feedback just as much as those with low depression scores. But participants with higher levels of depression engaged in more cognitive immunization. In particular, they didn’t generalize the positive comments about their test performance to what might happen in the future. Instead, they assumed that their positive performance on the task was just an exception. Going back to our example, Chris might be thinking, “Well, I did well on that test, so I guess I’m pretty good at the tough stuff.” But Sam would be more likely to think, “I did well in this specific area, but that’s just a fluke, because I’m pretty bad at the hard stuff in general.”

Essential readings on depression

Michael Burrows/Pexels

Source: Michael Burrows/Pexels

In summary, what this study suggests is that depressed people might believe positive comments, even when they are surprising. But they may struggle to generalize these comments, believing instead that when they do well at something, it’s an exception to the rule. For example, if you’re depressed and someone says, “It was so great meeting you!” I had such a great time,” it’s not that you won’t believe them. It’s that those positive comments won’t do much to change your view of how your social interactions will generally go down in the future. This research suggests a possible cognitive “target” for therapists working to treat people with depression: to help generalize specific items of positive feedback to more general expectations about future events.

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The psychology of phishing attacks http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/the-psychology-of-phishing-attacks/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 20:07:00 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/the-psychology-of-phishing-attacks/ We’re excited to bring back Transform 2022 in person on July 19 and virtually from July 20-28. Join leaders in AI and data for in-depth discussions and exciting networking opportunities. Register today! In cybersecurity, the human condition is the most frequent and easiest target. For threat actors, exploiting their human targets is usually the easiest […]]]>

We’re excited to bring back Transform 2022 in person on July 19 and virtually from July 20-28. Join leaders in AI and data for in-depth discussions and exciting networking opportunities. Register today!


In cybersecurity, the human condition is the most frequent and easiest target. For threat actors, exploiting their human targets is usually the easiest fruition instead of developing and deploying an exploit. Therefore, adversaries often target an organization’s employees first, usually through phishing attacks.

Phishing is a social engineering attack in which threat actors send fraudulent communications, usually emails, that appear to come from a trusted source and give the reader a sense of timeliness. The FBI’s 2021 Internet Crime Report analyzed data from 847,376 reported cybercrimes and found a sharp increase in the number of phishing attacks, from 25,344 incidents in 2017 to 323,972 in 2021.

The growing sophistication of phishing

Early email phishing attacks typically involved a poorly worded fraudulent message to trick users into sending money to fraudulent bank accounts; they have since evolved into sophisticated and well-designed social engineering attacks. In today’s digital world, everyone knows that phishing is bad, but trust is still the main driver of these attacks. Threat actors seek out their targets; they examine public employee profiles and assignments, vendor relationships, and whether an organization’s human resources department uses a specific type of portal to transmit information. The basis for all of these potential phishing attacks is the implicit trust employees have in the pre-existing relationship.

The common nature of these attacks does not reduce their dangerousness. Verizon reported that phishing was the initial attack vector in 80% of reported security incidents in 2020 and was one of the most common vectors for ransomware, a malicious malware attack that encrypts data. Phishing was also the entry point for 22% of data breaches in 2020.

In addition to the implicit trust of coming from a known sender, a successful phishing email exploits the emotions of the reader, creating a sense of urgency by applying just enough pressure to deceive an otherwise diligent user. There are various ways to exert pressure to influence otherwise reasonable employees. Spoofed emails that appear to come from someone in a position of authority use the leverage that bosses and departments such as HR have against the reader. Social situations such as reciprocity, maybe helping a co-worker, and consistency, paying your supplier or contractor on time to maintain a good relationship, can also lead the reader to click on a link in a phishing email.

According to Tessian Research report Psychology of Human Error 2022, a follow-up to their 2020 report with Stanford University, 52% of people clicked on a phishing email because it looked like it was from a senior company executive, compared to 41% in 2020. Additionally, employees were more prone to error when fatigued, something threat actors regularly exploit. Tessian reported in 2021 that most phishing attacks are sent between 2 p.m. and 6 p.m., the crisis after lunch when employees are most likely to be tired or distracted.

Employees may be hesitant to report the phishing incident after realizing they acted out of trust and were duped. They are likely to feel bad and may even fear retaliation from their organization. However, reporting the incident is the best case scenario. Having employees fall victim to phishing attempts and sweeping them under the rug is how a cyber event can turn into a full-scale cyber incident. Instead, organizations should create a culture where cybersecurity is a shared responsibility and foster an open dialogue about phishing and other cyber threats.

Cybersecurity is hard, but learning it doesn’t have to be

Organizations that are successful in discussing cybersecurity make the topic accessible and accessible to all employees. To facilitate open dialogue, organizations should employ a defense-in-depth strategy; it is a combination of technical and non-technical controls that reduce, mitigate and respond to cybersecurity threats. Security awareness training is only one piece of the defense-in-depth puzzle. To truly build a robust security program, many different mitigating controls need to be introduced into a company’s environment.

Annual security awareness training does not adequately address the human element exploited by phishing attacks. An example of an engaging training program is that of security awareness organization, Curricula, which uses behavioral science techniques like storytelling to impact employee training. The goal of Curricula’s storytelling approach is to impact employees and enable them (or influence them, to borrow from threat actors) to remember and recall information for use in real world scenarios. Their approach has merit — a Reported customer resume that after launching a phishing simulation and training program, they saw a reduction in click-through rate from 32% to 3% among more than 600 employees in six months.

When properly armed with tools, knowledge, and resources, previously distracted and disengaged employees can be your best line of defense – a human firewall against phishing, ransomware, and malware.

To be successful, management must be involved in the process — and the training

Part of understanding the human condition is understanding that you will need the budget and tools to secure the technical resources that prevent, mitigate, and transfer digital risk to optimize your security culture. Organizations can feel a false sense of security when passing a security audit or certification. Yet, as recent years have shown, digital risks are constantly evolving and threat actors will not hesitate to take advantage of national or global tragedies to turn cybercrime into profit. Threat actors routinely target organizations for their poor technology choices and disregard factors such as industry, size, or the type of data they are protecting.

Additionally, C-level executives are not immune to successful phishing attacks. Spear phishing or whaling attacks target specific organizational executives. In 2017, it was announced that two technology companies, widely assumed to be Google and Facebook, was the victim of a $100 million spear-phishing attack. US attorney Joon Kim called the event a wake-up call that anyone could be a victim of phishing.

The digital economy continues to transform at a rapid pace. IDC reportedthat by 2023, 75% of organizations will have comprehensive roadmaps for implementing digital transformation, up from 27% today.

For organizations to truly thrive and withstand the next phase of digital risks that will accompany these transformations, they must first create a strong culture of security and equip employees with the tools to recognize, respond to, and report phishing attacks and others. Additionally, layering the right tools such as multi-factor authentication, endpoint detection and response, and even a strong cyber insurance partner can create a layered defense-in-depth strategy. This layered defense approach will help organizations prevent a cyber event such as phishing from escalating into a business-disrupting cyber incident such as a data breach or ransomware attack.

Tommy Johnson is a cybersecurity engineer at Coalition.

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Elon University / Performing Arts / About Elon Dance Science http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/elon-university-performing-arts-about-elon-dance-science/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 07:20:49 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/elon-university-performing-arts-about-elon-dance-science/ Combining the art of dance with scientific principles The mission of the Dance Science degree program is to prepare students to acquire a broad knowledge of the sub-disciplines of Dance Science and to enable students to reach their highest technical and creative potential in a variety of dance forms. Emphasis is placed on the practical […]]]>

Combining the art of dance with scientific principles

The mission of the Dance Science degree program is to prepare students to acquire a broad knowledge of the sub-disciplines of Dance Science and to enable students to reach their highest technical and creative potential in a variety of dance forms. Emphasis is placed on the practical application of scientific principles to improve dance and movement performance, improve dance training, reduce injury, and contribute to the overall well-being of dancers. The Dance Science program uniquely combines elements of the exercise science curriculum with the Dance Performance and Choreography curriculum and encourages study abroad opportunities and undergraduate research projects.

Interdisciplinary curriculum

Dance science is an emerging field that combines the study of dance with the application of scientific principles to dance. The degree incorporates courses that already exist in the Department of Exercise Science and the Dance Program in the Department of Performing Arts. It draws only eight credit hours from biology, 20 from exercise science courses, and 20 from dance and allows the student to choose eight credit hours of electives from ESS, DAN, or other approved courses. This offers the student the opportunity to create a sub-specialty of their choice. The requirements for the Dance Science degree can be completed in three years, allowing freshmen who arrive at Elon without a clear major the opportunity to experience this field, interview the program coordinator their freshman year, and then to start the study program in the second year.

Expert and accessible faculty

At Elon, students learn from dedicated faculty who have years of expertise in their fields and in academia. Small classes provide students with unique access to faculty and one-to-one instruction. All faculty maintain professional contacts in their fields, so they are able to help students identify suitable graduate and professional schools, internships, and career opportunities.

Excellent facilities and equipment

Dance science majors work at the Center for the Arts, home to three state-of-the-art dance studios with somatic equipment, and Elon’s Koury Athletic Center, home to a full range of health, training, and fitness facilities. exercise and sports. . The Health and Human Performance Laboratory has instruments to access body composition, aerobic fitness, muscle strength, endurance and athletic performance. The lab also includes new electroencephalography (EEG) and electromyography (EMG) equipment.

I’ve always excelled in science, but when it came to choosing a major, my passion for dance was undeniably stronger. With Elon’s new degree in Dance Science, I am able to marry the two fields without having to give up or dedicate less time to my innate passion for movement. Classes in the dance science major helped me become a better dancer by giving me an understanding of the physics, anatomy, and psychology of dance. I even had the chance to conduct my own research comparing the activation of eight different muscles at and away from the bar. No other undergraduate dance program could have prepared me for such a rare opportunity.

Colette Dong, BFA Dance Performance & Choreography and BS Dance Science ’14

Learning outside the classroom

One of the hallmarks of an Elon education is hands-on learning, and dance science is no exception. Putting the skills, approaches and theories of the discipline to the test in real-life situations is essential for a full understanding of the subject. This can be achieved through internships and undergraduate research experiences.

Dance science majors are strongly encouraged to complete an internship and participate in undergraduate research projects. Both provide invaluable opportunities for students to hone their skills, observe how the industry works, gain experience working with people, build confidence and make valuable contacts in the industry. industry.

Career options

The Dance Science program is designed to provide an academic pathway for students interested in studying dance science to pursue careers as dance teachers, fitness and fitness coaches, physical therapists, and researchers in a variety of fields, including biomechanics, physiology, somatics, and psychology. This degree prepares students for graduate study in a variety of disciplines, including physical or occupational therapy, dance education, dance science, exercise science, and medicine.

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Gender, through the eyes of a primatologist | Lifetime review http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/gender-through-the-eyes-of-a-primatologist-lifetime-review/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 16:00:00 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/gender-through-the-eyes-of-a-primatologist-lifetime-review/ Pronouns, language, hairstyles, social roles and expectations surrounding gender identity have historically defined who we are. But is gender a uniquely human construct? Frans de Waal, primatologist and author of the 2005 bestseller “Our Inner Monkey: Renowned Primatologist Explains Why We Are Who We Arehas spent decades studying animal behavior, particularly in our closest evolutionary […]]]>

Pronouns, language, hairstyles, social roles and expectations surrounding gender identity have historically defined who we are. But is gender a uniquely human construct?

Frans de Waal, primatologist and author of the 2005 bestseller “Our Inner Monkey: Renowned Primatologist Explains Why We Are Who We Arehas spent decades studying animal behavior, particularly in our closest evolutionary cousins, bonobos and chimpanzees, which may hold the key to understanding our own behavior, identity and biological differences.

“Gender diversity is not something that we kind of invented or is superficial,” says de Waal. “I think it’s inherently present in other primates.”

Dive deeper into life, philosophy and what makes us human by joining the Life Examined discussion group on Facebook.

De Waal is Professor of Psychology at Emory University and director of Living Links Center to Yerkes National Center for Primate Research in Atlanta, Georgia. He has published numerous books and articles on animal behavior. In his latest book,Different: gender through the eyes of a primatologistde Waal focuses on the differences and similarities between male and female primates. Are these behaviors learned or genetically hardwired?

Jonathan Bastian talks with de Waal about his research and what we can learn from animals about gender. Are there specific male and female roles or traits? Does gender even exist in the animal world?

“Sometimes a mother dies, all of a sudden there is an orphan. And then male chimpanzees show a potential that we rarely see: they have nurturing tendencies,” de Waal explains. “A male adopts one of these orphans, not just for two days or so, but sometimes for five years.”

Primologist and author Frans de Waal. Photo by Catherine Marin. Book cover “Different: gender, through the eyes of a primatologist »

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Katie Witkiewitz named director of UNM Center on Alcohol, Substance Use and Addiction : UNM Newsroom http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/katie-witkiewitz-named-director-of-unm-center-on-alcohol-substance-use-and-addiction-unm-newsroom/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 23:00:42 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/katie-witkiewitz-named-director-of-unm-center-on-alcohol-substance-use-and-addiction-unm-newsroom/ After a nationwide search, Ellen R. Fisher, vice president of research at the University of New Mexico, named Professor Katie Witkiewitz director of the Center on Alcohol, Drug Abuse and Addictions (CASAA). Witkiewitz will succeed J. Scott Tonigan, who will retire effective June 30. Tonigan has served as Director and Acting Director of CASAA since […]]]>

After a nationwide search, Ellen R. Fisher, vice president of research at the University of New Mexico, named Professor Katie Witkiewitz director of the Center on Alcohol, Drug Abuse and Addictions (CASAA). Witkiewitz will succeed J. Scott Tonigan, who will retire effective June 30. Tonigan has served as Director and Acting Director of CASAA since 2017 and has been affiliated with CASAA since its inception in the late 1980s, working with CASAA’s Founder and UNM. Emeritus Professor William Miller.

“My dream is for CASAA to be an organization with a culture of appreciation, openness to diverse research methods and different worldviews, and where every CASAA member is committed to team science, engaged work in the community and the shared vision.” – Katie Witkiewitz, professor at UNM

“We are very pleased to welcome Dr. Witkiewitz as the new Director of CASAA, an important role at UNM and for New Mexico,” Fisher said. “She brings an excellent track record of funding, publications and mentorship, and I look forward to working with her and the staff and researchers at CASAA to bring one of UNM’s flagship centers to the next level. superior. I truly appreciate all the time, energy and dedication that the members of the Main Campus and Health Sciences Center Search Committee put into making the search for this important position a success.

Witkiewitz was recruited to UNM in 2012 as a tenured associate professor in psychology and a cross-appointment to CASAA. She was promoted to professor in 2017 and regents professor in 2018. She earned her doctorate in psychology in 2005 from the University of Washington, a master’s degree in psychology in 2000 from the University of Montana, and her bachelor of arts in psychology from the State University of New York at Potsdam in 1999. Witkiewitz is also a first-generation graduate.

“My lived experience as a first-generation college student, who experienced significant socio-economic and rural disadvantage throughout my childhood, also shaped my commitment to helping the people of New Mexico and my willingness to helping mentees from historically disadvantaged communities succeed and thrive,” she says.

His research program examines and treats substance use disorders, with an emphasis on harm reduction, recovery processes, and the application of advanced quantitative research methods to better understand changes in behavior. alcohol and drug use over time. Witkiewitz is also a licensed clinical psychologist with 20 years of experience treating people with substance use disorders and has worked extensively developing, evaluating, and disseminating mindfulness-based treatments for substance use disorders. She trains clinicians to deliver mindfulness-based treatments for substance use in New Mexico, nationally and internationally.

“I am deeply committed to improving access to treatment and improving the quality of treatment for substance use disorders,” Witkiewitz said. “My clinical work and research has focused on prevention, treatment, dissemination and implementation with specialization in the treatment of alcohol use disorders, substance use disorders opioids and polysubstance use, as well as precision medicine approaches for substance use disorders.”

Witkiewitz has published six books, over 265 peer-reviewed publications, and 25 book chapters. Her research and scholarship have been cited over 17,000 times and she has given over 70 invited lectures at national and international meetings. Additionally, Witkiewitz has provided professional training in the United States, as well as in Canada, Brazil and Australia.

Since beginning his career at UNM in 2012, Witkiewitz has submitted more than 80 grant applications to the National Institutes of Health as a principal investigator, co-investigator, or consultant, with 11 applications submitted as a principal investigator. Of these applications, 45 grants were funded and nine of the 11 grants she submitted to UNM as Principal Investigator were funded. Witkiewitz recently co-led a team with Matthew Pearson, associate research professor at CASAA, UNM researchers at CASAA and the Health Science Center, successfully receiving the UNM IMPOWR grant from the National Institutes of Health Center which will focuses on the treatment of opioid use disorders and chronic pain. The UNM IMPOWR Center will provide over $10 million in total costs to CASAA over the next five years.

Witkiewitz said she is focused on the future of CASAA, which has hired several promising early-career researchers and postdoctoral fellows over the past few years.

“We have been working to recruit several new investigators to CASAA, and I want them to have everything they need to succeed as the next generation of phenomenal CASAA investigators who are making major contributions to the field of substance abuse. “Witkiewitz said. “Furthermore, I have personally achieved everything I could have hoped to accomplish as an individual scientist. I see the next phase of my career as ‘climbing lift’ and doing whatever I can to support the incredible group of scientists we have recruited to CASAA in recent years, as well as supporting those who will be recruited in the future through the T32 Training Grant and the UNM IMPOWR Center.

“Katie and CASAA will play an important role in continuing to study the ravages of the opioid overdose epidemic in New Mexico and nationally.” – Ellen R. Fisher, UNM Vice President for Research

Prior to being named Director, Witkiewitz served as Director of Training for a National Institutes of Health T32 Training Fellowship and served as primary or secondary mentor to six postdoctoral fellows and six predoctoral fellows. Four of the postdoctoral fellows and four of the predoctoral fellows she mentored through this project received career development and training fellowships funded by the National Institutes of Health. Witkiewitz currently leads the Grand Challenge of Substance Use Disorders Student Scholars Program, which provides funding to UNM graduate students from multiple disciplines focused on the study of substance use disorders and health equity issues in New Mexico.

“This is a very exciting and important time to be a researcher in the field of addictions and to be a scientist at CASAA and New Mexico. I believe Katie has a unique opportunity to position CASAA to successfully maintain her status as a center at the forefront of addiction research with increased funding for substance use disorders,” says Fisher. “Katie and CASAA will play an important role in continuing to study the devastation of the epidemic of opioid overdose in New Mexico and nationally, as well as the impacts of the recent legalization of recreational cannabis in New Mexico.”

Witkiewitz said she’s okay with it, but that she won’t just maintain CASAA’s status as a leader in addiction research, and that she has her sights set on the CASAA “upgrade”.

“My dream is for CASAA to be an organization with a culture of appreciation, openness to diverse research methods and different worldviews, and where every CASAA member is committed to team science, engaged work in community and shared vision My long-term goal is for CASAA to be a resource for all New Mexicans, to be strongly integrated into the communities we serve, and to be an international leader in harm reduction research and education,” she said. “My short-term goals are for CASAA to be successful in renewing our T32 Training Grant and UNM IMPOWR Center Grant, and to apply for a larger grant to National Institutes Health Centers over the next two years Dr. Matthew Pearson and I are also currently planning several grant applications for CASAA to serve as a resource for organizations. recovery support organizations in our community and to serve as a coordinating center for further National Institutes of Health-funded research on harm reduction approaches to substance use disorders. .”

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UB to Host 2022 Positioning Theory Conference – UBNow: News and Views for UB Faculty and Staff http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/ub-to-host-2022-positioning-theory-conference-ubnow-news-and-views-for-ub-faculty-and-staff/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 18:01:19 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/ub-to-host-2022-positioning-theory-conference-ubnow-news-and-views-for-ub-faculty-and-staff/ Scholars, researchers and students from around the world interested in Positioning Theory – a concept in social psychology that characterizes the interactions between individuals – are invited to attend the Positioning Theory 2022 Conference to be held next month at ‘UB. Organized by the Graduate School of Education’s Center for Literacy and Reading Instruction, the […]]]>

Scholars, researchers and students from around the world interested in Positioning Theory – a concept in social psychology that characterizes the interactions between individuals – are invited to attend the Positioning Theory 2022 Conference to be held next month at ‘UB.

Organized by the Graduate School of Education’s Center for Literacy and Reading Instruction, the international conference will allow researchers and practitioners at all career stages to share in-depth research and discuss the use of positioning theory in social science disciplines.

The three-day conference is scheduled for July 24-27. Guests can attend in person at Clemens Hall on North Campus or virtually. In-person participation includes access to on-site and virtual sessions. The conference is open to everyone, but pre-registration is required by June 22. To register, visit the conference website.

“Even if someone else’s discipline is unrelated to yours, you still have something to say because you share that interest in positioning theory,” says Mary McVee, professor of learning and teacher and director of the Center for Literacy and Reading Instruction. “That’s what makes small conferences like this so special: you can have these interesting conversations.”

Positioning theory addresses individual rights, duties and obligations and explores the mechanisms by which roles are assigned or denied, to oneself or to others. Theory describes the scenarios and agency that determine the boundaries of future actions and the meaning of what people say and do.

Research on the theory suggests that positioning can have direct moral implications. A person’s or group’s position can lead to identification as trustworthy or distrustful, or “with us” or “against us”. Additionally, multiple positions can be identified in a way that helps move beyond binary approaches to problems.

“I used positioning to see how predominantly white teachers talk about race and how they position themselves and the multiple positions they occupy,” says McVee. “If we think of the positions as multiple, it allows us, in any field and with many different research problems and disciplines, to explore the multifaceted parts that exist.”

Speakers will represent 13 countries and a wide range of disciplines, including education, political science, linguistics, business, communication studies and international relations. Keynote speakers include:

  • Luk Van Langenhove, teacher-researcher and academic curator at the Free University of Brussels. Langenhove is one of the founding theorists who helped establish what is now known as positioning theory.
  • Michael Bamberg, professor of psychology at Clark University. Bamberg is known for his work on storytelling and identity, and how short stories are used as general strategies for creating meaning and building identity.
  • Bo Allesøe Christensen, associate professor of communication and psychology at Aalborg University in Denmark. Christensen’s academic interests include media studies, cultural psychology, and philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein.
  • Pasi Hirvonen, visiting researcher at the United Nations University Institute for Comparative Studies on Regional Integration in Belgium. Hirvonen is an expert in the use of positioning theory and conversational analysis in the study of small groups and organizational change.
  • Mary McVee, professor of learning and instruction at UB and director of the Center for Literacy and Reading Instruction. McVee’s work focuses on racial positioning in teachers’ discussions and multimodal positioning in children’s engineering literacies.
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Pacific.scoop.co.nz » Fulbright NZ Cohort 2022 Announcement http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/pacific-scoop-co-nz-fulbright-nz-cohort-2022-announcement/ Sun, 12 Jun 2022 23:20:08 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/pacific-scoop-co-nz-fulbright-nz-cohort-2022-announcement/ Press release – Fulbright EN WELLINGTON, NEW ZEALAND, Monday June 13, 2022 – Fulbright New Zealand is delighted to announce the 2022 New Zealand Fulbright Scholarship winners. The new cohort will be honored at the Fulbright Awards Ceremony at the Library Wellington National…WELLINGTON, NEW ZEALAND, Monday, June 13, 2022—Fulbright New Zealand is delighted to announce […]]]>

Press release – Fulbright EN

WELLINGTON, NEW ZEALAND, Monday June 13, 2022 – Fulbright New Zealand is delighted to announce the 2022 New Zealand Fulbright Scholarship winners. The new cohort will be honored at the Fulbright Awards Ceremony at the Library Wellington National…
WELLINGTON, NEW ZEALAND, Monday, June 13, 2022—Fulbright New Zealand is delighted to announce the 2022 Fulbright New Zealand Scholarship winners. The new cohort will be honored at the Fulbright Awards Ceremony at the National Library in Wellington on Monday June 27, hosted by the Honorable Aupito William Sio, Minister for Pacific Peoples and Minister for Courts.

Penelope Borland, Executive Director of Fulbright New Zealand, said: “This year we are delighted to be able to announce and honor a full cohort of New Zealand Fulbright Scholars who will soon receive their awards in person in the United States. Each year, I am heartened to see such a talented group of people receive these life-changing awards. It is particularly gratifying to see the wide range of disciplines represented this year, from molecular engineering to music to performative poetry. I know that, regardless of research area, all new grantees will adhere to the key mission of the Fulbright Program: to enhance global and cross-cultural understanding and advance the public good.

Established in the United States in 1946, the Fulbright program is one of the largest and most important educational exchanges in the world. Fostering academic excellence and connection between people, the Fulbright program seeks to “bring a little more knowledge, a little more reason and a little more compassion into world affairs”.

This year there are 27 Fulbright New Zealand Award winners in total. They are:

Fulbright NZ Postgraduate Scholarships in Science and Innovation

Anna Clark de Hurunui will study potential outcomes of genetic pest control at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, for a PhD at the University of Otago. Anna completed a BSc in Genetics in 2017 and an MSc in Genetics in 2021 from the University of Otago.

Melody Yunjeong Kim from Auckland will research childhood trauma and youth mental health at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts towards a PhD at the University of Auckland. Melody graduated with a BSc in Psychology in 2020 and a BSc (Hons First Class) in 2021 from the University of Auckland.

Alehandrea Raiha Manuel (Ngāti Pōrou) will research equity and telehealth in Indigenous ear and hearing care at the University of Arizona in Tucson, Arizona and the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences in Little Rock, Arkansas for a Ph.D. at the University of Auckland. Alehandrea obtained a BHSc and PGDipPH (Distinction) in 2012 from the University of Auckland, and a MAudSt in 2014 from the University of Queensland.

Aya Morris de Kaitaia will research sustainability and resilience in coastal communities at Columbia University in New York, New York toward a master’s degree in Sustainable Development Goals at Massey University. Aya obtained a BA in Psychology in 2013 and a PgDip Ed (Ed Psych) in 2016 from Massey University, and a Diploma in Te Aupikitanga ki Te Reo Kairangi in 2018 from Te Wānanga o Aotearoa.

Sophie Oliff of Wellington will complete a Master of Science in Clinical Service Operations at Harvard University in Boston, Massachusetts. Sophie obtained a BHSc (Hons) in Population Health in 2013 from the University of Auckland and a BPharm in 2016 from the University of Otago.

Briana Steven from Christchurch will complete a Master of Engineering in Bioengineering at the University of California, Berkeley, CA. Briana graduated with a BE (Hons First Class) in Mechanical Engineering in 2021 from the University of Canterbury.

Georgia Third from Auckland will complete a PhD in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of California in Santa Cruz, California. Georgia graduated with a BSc in Marine and Environmental Science in 2020, PgDipSci in Marine Science in 2021 and MSc in Marine Science in 2022 from the University of Auckland.

Mattias Tolhurst of Wellington will complete a doctorate in molecular engineering at the University of Washington in Seattle, Washington. Mattias completed a BSc in Mathematics and Biotechnology and a BBMedSc in Pharmacology and Medicinal Chemistry in 2020, and a BSc in Biotechnology (Hons First Class) in 2021 from Te Herenga Waka Victoria University, Wellington.

Rebecca White from Auckland will complete a Master of Arts with a concentration in Science at Columbia Journalism School in New York, New York. Rebekah earned a BA in English and Comparative Literature in 2009 from the University of Auckland and a postgraduate degree in Journalism from Auckland University of Technology in 2010.

Rachael Yielder from Auckland will study people’s mindsets towards disease and medication and their influence on health outcomes at Stanford University in Palo Alto, California, for a PhD at the University of Auckland. Rachael obtained a BA in Psychology and Sociology in 2013 from the University of Auckland, a BA (Hons First Class) in Music Business from the University of Sussex at BIMM Manchester in 2017 and an MHealthPsych (First Class) from the University of Auckland. in 2022.

Fulbright NZ General Scholarships

Isabelle Gregoire from Christchurch will complete a Master of Music in Flute Performance at Rice University in Houston, Texas. Isabella obtained a BMus (Hons First Class) in Classical Performance and a BA in Religious Studies in 2021 from Te Herenga Waka Victoria University of Wellington.

Ngarangi Haerewa (Te-Whanau-to-Apanui) de Whangaparāoa will complete a master’s degree in public policy specializing in development at the University of California, Berkeley, California. Ngarangi graduated with a BA in Communication (Hons First Class) from the University of Otago in 2015.

Jordan Hamel de Timaru will complete an MFA in Creative Writing at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Michigan. Jordan graduated with a BA/LLB in 2015 from the University of Otago.

Jack Harre from Christchurch will complete a Master of Music in Jazz Performance at New York University in New York City. Jack graduated with a BMus (Hons First Class) in Jazz Performance from Te Kōkī School of Music, Te Herenga Waka Victoria University of Wellington in 2021.

Zoë Henry (Ngāpuhi, Ngāti Kahu, Makefu – Niue) from Auckland will research Indigenous understandings of punishment at the University of California, Los Angeles for a PhD at the University of Auckland. Zoë obtained a BA in 2014, a BA (Hons Second Class) in History in 2016 and an MA (First Class) in History in 2018 from the University of Auckland.

bronze heron de Taranaki will complete an MFA in Creative Writing at The New School in New York. Bronte obtained a BFA (Hons First Class) in 2016 from the Elam School of Fine Arts and an MA in Creative Writing in 2021 from the International Institute of Modern Letters at Te Herenga Waka Victoria University of Wellington.

Rayhan Langdana of Wellington will complete a master’s degree in electoral law at the University of California in Berkeley, California. Rayhan graduated with an LLB (Hons) and BA in History and Politics in 2018 from the University of Auckland.

Pete McKenzie of Wellington will complete a Master of Arts in Journalism at Columbia University in New York, New York. Pete graduated with an LLB (Hons First Class) and BA in Political Science and Mandarin in 2022 from Te Herenga Waka Victoria University, Wellington.

Leola Meynell from Palmerston North will study how climate change affects women’s reproductive decisions at the University of California Riverside in Riverside, California, toward a doctorate in psychology at Massey University. Leola graduated with a BA (Hons First Class) in Psychology in 2017 and an MSc in Psychology in 2020 from Massey University.

Dexter Stanley-Tauvao, (Vailoa Faleata, Tāga i Savai’i) de Wellington will complete a Master of Music in Jazz Studies at the Aaron Copland School of Music, Queens College in New York. Dexter graduated with a BMus (Hons First Class) in Jazz Performance in 2018 and a BA in German from Te Herenga Waka Victoria University.

Liam Wooding, (Ngāti Hinearo, Ngāti Tuera/ Te Ati Haunui-a-Paparangi) de Whanganui will research music performance at the University of California, San Diego, California, in preparation for a DMA at the University of Waikato. Liam graduated with a BMus in Classical Performance from the University of Auckland in 2013, an MMus (Hons First Class) from the University of Waikato in 2017 and completed the Professional Performance Program at the Australian National Academy of Music in 2019.

Joseph Xulué (Siloé – New Caledonia, Lufi Lufi, Fagamalo – Samoa) from Auckland will complete a Master of Laws in Criminal Justice Reform and Indigenous Peoples’ Rights at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Joseph obtained a BCom and an LLB in 2016 from the University of Auckland.

Fulbright-Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga Graduate Scholarship

Nikki Barrett (born Haereroa) (Ngāti Hauā, Ngāti Poru) of Kirikiriroa will research the revitalization of traditional Indigenous knowledge and practices of childbirth for a PhD at the University of Waikato. Nikki obtained a BSpLS in 2009 and an MSpLS in 2016 from Te Whare Wānanga o Waikato – University of Waikato.

Fulbright NZ Scholarships

Apo Aporosa de Kirikiriroa will study both kava-related hepatotoxicity and culturally appropriate therapeutic interventions to reduce post-traumatic stress disorder in post-combat soldiers at various institutions in Hawai’i. Apo is a lecturer and researcher at Te Huataki Waiora School of Health and Te Kura Whatu Oho Mauri School of Psychology at Te Whare Wānanga o Waikato – University of Waikato.

Tago Mharapara from Auckland will study the integration of research evidence into health policy-making
process at Brown University’s Policy Lab in Providence, Rhode Island. Tago is a research lecturer at Auckland University of Technology.

Rachel Simon Kumar from Auckland will be researching a feminist political science project called “Ethnic Minority Women in New Zealand Politics Project” at Georgetown University in Washington DC. Rachel is an Associate Professor at the University of Auckland.

Fulbright-Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga Scholarship

Will Flavell (Ngā Puhi, Ngāti Whatua, Tainui, Ngāti Maniapoto) from Te Atatū South, Tāmaki Makaurau will explore how language, culture, and identity figure into the school experiences of young Native Americans in Massachusetts. Will is the Kaihautū Māori of Te Hononga Akoranga COMET Auckland and elected to the local council of Henderson-Massey.

For more information, visit www.fulbright.org.nz

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]]> Why Ignoring Genetic Differences Between People Exacerbates Inequalities http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/why-ignoring-genetic-differences-between-people-exacerbates-inequalities/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 16:00:00 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/why-ignoring-genetic-differences-between-people-exacerbates-inequalities/ It’s no wonder many people are suspicious of behavioral genetics. The field, which examines how the DNA we are born with affects our behaviors, has been hijacked by eugenicists, white supremacists and mainstream bigots as a way to justify inequality for minorities, women, the poor and other disadvantaged groups for more than a century. But […]]]>

It’s no wonder many people are suspicious of behavioral genetics. The field, which examines how the DNA we are born with affects our behaviors, has been hijacked by eugenicists, white supremacists and mainstream bigots as a way to justify inequality for minorities, women, the poor and other disadvantaged groups for more than a century.

But anyone interested in egalitarian goals shouldn’t shy away from the field, argues psychologist Dr. Kathryn Paige Harden. Instead, they should embrace it as a tool to inform policies that promote equality.

What are behavioral genetics?

Each person is born with a set of genes inherited from their biological parents. These genes carry information that shapes each person’s characteristics, such as physical appearance, personality, and medical conditions.

Humans, regardless of race or origin, are more than 99% genetically identical. But this remainder less than 1% represents significant differences between people. As Harden told Big Think:

“A lot of the psychological, behavioral, and physical differences between us are tied to that tiny fraction of our genome that differs between us… Your risk of schizophrenia, your risk of depression, how far you go in school.”

Behavioral genetics is the study of these differences and how they predict life outcomes.

Importantly, your genes alone do not determine life outcomes. Even the strongest relationships between genes and psychology – like those of intelligence and schizophrenia – only count for around 50% or less variance.

Instead, our genes constantly interact with our environment. Epigenetic research even reveals that our genes can essentially be turned on or off by a myriad of factors, including malnutrition, environmental pollutants and psychological stress. And while genes create a framework that influences our physiology and psychology, the environment provides opportunities for learn, adjust and shape behaviours.

Genetic research has been misunderstood and misused

There’s a long history of people misusing genetic research to justify societal inequality.

Based on designs from “hard heredity” – which (wrongly) assumes that genes determine outcomes independent of environmental factors – some have used genetic research to argue that social inequality is due to immutable genetic differences. And because poverty and life outcomes are ingrained in every person’s genes, logic dictates that social policies are futile.

Genetic research has even been used to justify eugenics: the belief that genetics indicates a natural human hierarchy that determines one’s social value and status. Eugenicists have advocated sterilizing or attempting to eradicate individuals or entire cultural groups believed to be genetically inferior or “unfit” because of their genes.

Behavioral genetics can be a tool for positive change

In response to this historic misappropriation, many people and organizations with egalitarian values ​​have chosen to ignoring, degrading or prohibiting funding for research on genetic and biological differences.

Dr. Harden takes the opposite position. Despite – or perhaps because of – this historical abuse, she argues that those interested in equality cannot ignore genetic differences. Doing so would allow the misinterpretation and the abuse of genetic research to go unchallenged.

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Instead, genetics should be used as a tool for positive change and improving equality.

Genetics is luck, not value. First, Harden points out, genetics is not a measure of human worth, but rather represents simply chance-based reasons why people differ. Two parents can have children with any of the more than 70 trillion possible genetic combinations. No one has control over the DNA they are born with.

Moreover, this genetic lottery influences inequalities ranging from health to level of education. So, according to Harden, people who care about fairness should care about genes.

“If we care about the inequality that comes from the accidents of people’s birth, the kind of fluke they have no control over, then we should care about the genetic inequality,” Harden told Big. Think. “Because it’s one of the main sources of inequality in this country.”

Genetics can guide the construction of better environments. In addition, identifying genetic differences helps to ensure that significant differences are taken into account and can be used to ensure that everyone can maximize their success in life.

Remember that genes alone do not determine life outcomes, but rather interact with the environment; and the environment can be changed. Harden exemplifies vision. Poor vision is largely caused by genes, but as a society we do not devalue those with poor eyesight or deny them meaningful life activities. Instead, scientists developed glasses, policymakers and corporations made them readily available, and our myopic friends became some of the most successful people in the world.

Conversely, lucky genes—for example, for extreme athleticism or exceptional math ability—are only beneficial in environments that value them and allow them to thrive, such as areas with athletic programs or those where everyone has access to quality education.

In short, recognizing genetic differences can help society create more individualized and supportive environments.

I think a lot of the power of genetics is a tool to help us understand the environment,” Harden told Big Think. “What are the social environments, school contexts, parental environments that can activate or deactivate genetic risk?

Policies and environments must be adapted to ensure that everyone, regardless of their genes, has the opportunity to succeed and fully participate in society. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is a successful example. The ADA recognizes that some people have physical disabilities and in turn creates environments (with elevators, Braille, etc.) that everyone can use, regardless of their physical differences.

The anti-eugenics framework for more equality

Genome blindness – that is, ignoring genetic variation – ignores meaningful differences between people and how they experience life. This in turn can exacerbate inequalities.

As such, people who care about equality should be anti-eugenics, not anti-genetics. To improve equality, Harden argues that they should support research on how to improve and adapt school, family and community environments. They should defend social policies who support everyone to maximize their potential.

By integrating science and values, we can create a more equal world.

“Science doesn’t fit neatly into ideology,” Harden told Big Think. “What we need to do is think about our values, what the science says, and then take those two things seriously when developing policy.”

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Physician Mood Linked to Medical Negligence Claim Risk http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/physician-mood-linked-to-medical-negligence-claim-risk/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 08:52:28 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/physician-mood-linked-to-medical-negligence-claim-risk/ New research published by scientists at the University of Melbourne in the British medical journal found a link between a doctor’s mood and their risk of being investigated for professional conduct. Disgruntled or overworked doctors were more likely to be sued for medical negligence, while those working in rural areas were also at high risk […]]]>

New research published by scientists at the University of Melbourne in the British medical journal found a link between a doctor’s mood and their risk of being investigated for professional conduct.

Disgruntled or overworked doctors were more likely to be sued for medical negligence, while those working in rural areas were also at high risk of professional investigation.

Researchers analyzed the responses of more than 12,000 doctors to the Medicine in Australia Balancing Employment and Life survey between 2013 and 2018.

The questionnaire included questions on age, personality, health, life satisfaction and working conditions.

Slightly more than one in 20 physicians said they had suffered a medical negligence claim during the study period.

The analysis found that overtime, working at a regional center, and recent personal injury or illness were linked to higher rates of medical negligence claims.

Physicians who performed poorly on life satisfaction or had increasing job demands were also more likely to face lawsuits.

In contrast, physicians who had pleasant personalities were slightly less likely to face a medical negligence claim.

Dr. Owen Bradfield pointed out that identifying risk factors related to professional conduct claims could provide valuable information to employers, regulators and healthcare practitioners caring for sick physicians.

“We need to reduce physician fatigue by addressing long working hours. We also need to create supportive work environments and target interventions that improve overall physician well-being, such as through healthy lifestyles. and a positive psychology program. This could reduce the risk of doctors being sued, and improve patient safety,” he said.

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