health issues – Populer Psikoloji http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/ Sat, 05 Mar 2022 17:58:04 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-01T204530.168-150x150.png health issues – Populer Psikoloji http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/ 32 32 Stigma and withholding mental health treatment http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/stigma-and-withholding-mental-health-treatment/ Sat, 05 Mar 2022 16:32:00 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/stigma-and-withholding-mental-health-treatment/ Source: Photo by Brett Sayles of Pexels Right now, the phrase “it’s ok to not be ok” should be emphasized to everyone. The pandemic and the war between Russia and Ukraine have added to the stress, sadness and difficulties of daily life. In his book Science Above Stigma: Mental Health Education and AdvocacyDaniel Morehead said […]]]>

Source: Photo by Brett Sayles of Pexels

Right now, the phrase “it’s ok to not be ok” should be emphasized to everyone. The pandemic and the war between Russia and Ukraine have added to the stress, sadness and difficulties of daily life.

In his book Science Above Stigma: Mental Health Education and AdvocacyDaniel Morehead said many polls now show that people believe mental health is real, treatable, as important as physical health and nothing to be ashamed of. While these polls have reflected a positive view of mental health and addiction in our society, the reality is that stigma continues to be the number one reason people withhold treatment or drop out of treatment prematurely. .

Morehead further said that less than half of people diagnosed with a mental health condition or addiction receive the treatment they need. For those who do receive treatment, many do not adhere to it and drop out. There are many reasons why people do not seek the help they need, such as financial problems for treatment, access to treatment, transportation to and from therapy, and not having the means to have access to telehealth at home.

In my presentations and workshops on stigma, mental health and addiction, I ask participants to vocalize some of the stigmatizing statements said to people with mental health and/or addiction issues. Examples include being weak, a loser, a failure, etc. It reflects social (public) stigma, negative perception and beliefs towards an individual or a group of people.

Next, we look at self-stigma, which occurs when people affected by mental health or addiction issues internalize negative beliefs and labels from society. This is a big part of why so many people try to ignore, fend for themselves, or hide their sanity and addiction. In these cases, people often hope for it to go away or try to deal with these issues on their own. You’re not alone!

Useful tips:

  • If you hear someone say derogatory things about someone with mental health and/or addiction issues, take a deep breath first. For many, anger or sadness can be overwhelming, especially if they say things that affect you directly.

Know that they may be saying this because they are struggling and they are saying these kinds of statements to create distance between their thoughts and the help they need. Alternatively, they may lack understanding and knowledge regarding mental health issues, addictions, and recovery.

  • Therapy. If you can financially go ahead with the treatment, that is something you should be very proud of. Therapy should not be sought in response to a situation or problem. This can be part of preventive care, in addition to building coping and problem-solving skills. If you’ve tried therapy in the past and didn’t have a great experience, don’t give up. Keep looking until you find the right therapist for you. It could be a game changer.

I often use the following situation as an example. If I go to a restaurant and have a bad meal or bad service, I may not go back to that restaurant, but I will continue to go to other restaurants. The same can be said of therapy. You may have an unpleasant experience, but instead of saying, “I’m done; therapy is not for me,” keep going until you find the one that’s right for you. There are so many excellent therapists and psychologists waiting for you to contact them.

  • Support groups. If you are struggling with mental health and/or addiction issues, many support groups are available. Support groups are often free. Whether you’re looking for 12-step addiction support groups, groups focused on anxiety, depression, grief and loss, and more. These groups can help alleviate feelings of loneliness and disconnection while strengthening how you feel about being part of a mental health/addiction recovery group.
  • National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI). As mentioned above regarding support groups, NAMI offers many support groups for individuals and families affected by addiction and mental health issues. These groups are free and often available in person and on a web platform. In addition to support groups, they advocate for mental health, offering community outreach and education. They offer many events focused on reducing stigma and increasing connection and support for those impacted by mental health and addiction issues.
  • Finally, contrary to the negative comments you hear due to mental health stigma, people who strive to improve their mental health are resilient, strong and empowered!

To find a therapist, visit Psychology Today’s Directory of Therapies.

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hint, it’s not your fault http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/hint-its-not-your-fault/ Sat, 05 Mar 2022 06:55:53 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/hint-its-not-your-fault/ Almost three-quarters of parents worry that their children’s use of mobile devices will be harmful to them or to family relationships – and this is apparent from research carried out before the pandemic. But it is not the fault of the parents or the children. Every time a parent and child try to turn off […]]]>

Almost three-quarters of parents worry that their children’s use of mobile devices will be harmful to them or to family relationships – and this is apparent from research carried out before the pandemic.

But it is not the fault of the parents or the children. Every time a parent and child try to turn off a game or put down a device, they’re not fighting — they’re fighting the invisible army of behavioral design specialists who make tech experiences so hard to pull off.

People who create apps and games use knowledge and experts from an area of ​​psychological research called “persuasive design,” whose researchers seek to understand how to create something that’s nearly impossible to put down.

But it’s important to be careful when trying to get kids hooked on something, as psychologist Richard Freed and I explain in our analysis of the ethical issues of persuasive design for children and adolescents. .


A quick introduction

Simply put, persuasive design combines behavioral psychology with technology to alter human behavior. It’s the answer to the age-old question, “Why are kids so glued to devices?”

The most basic summary is that there are three key mechanisms that together can change a person’s behavior: creating strong motivation, requiring little effort, and frequently inducing users to engage.

Knowing these principles can have productive and useful purposes, such as encouraging people to walk more or eat more fruits and vegetables. However, a common use of persuasive design is to increase the amount of time a person spends using a particular app or game. This increases the number of ads the person will see and the possibility of them buying something in-game, which increases the income of the app designer.

Adults are also influenced by persuasive design. That’s why they binge-watch streaming shows, endlessly scroll through social media, and usually play video games.

But because children’s brains are so malleable, children are especially susceptible to persuasive design strategies. Many parents have observed children’s exceptional enthusiasm for receiving stickers and tokens, whether physical or digital. Indeed, the ventral striatum, the pleasure center of the brain, is more sensitive to dopamine, the brain’s reward chemical, in children’s brains than in adult brains.

This excitement leads them to want to repeat the behavior to experience the neurological rewards over and over again.

In a 2019 survey of teenage screen time, three types of heavy users emerged from the data, all of which are influenced by persuasive design: social media users, video gamers, and viewers.

How it works

Social media sites like Instagram, Facebook, TikTok, and Snapchat are designed to maximize the results of persuasive design. Using “like” buttons and heart-shaped emoticons, these sites provide social signals, like acceptance and approval, that teens are highly motivated to seek out. Scrolling through sites requires very little effort. And apps trigger regular re-engagement through continuous notifications and prompts.

Snapchat, for example, urges users to send Snaps at least every 24 hours to keep their Snapstreak alive. To avoid the stress of missing their friends’ reactions or updates, kids are increasingly checking social media.

In video games, Fortnite lets players know how close they are to beating an opponent. This triggers the “near miss” phenomenon, encouraging people to keep playing because they were so close they might win next time. This is just one of the ways persuasive design has been adapted from adult gaming systems to digital video games for children.

Ethical Concerns

As a specialist in psychology, I fear that psychologists help designers of technologies to use the principles of psychology to manipulate children and adolescents in order to increase their use of an app, game or a particular website.

At the same time, other psychologists are studying the harms of these activities, including anxiety, depression, attention problems, and obesity.

Other psychologists have opened treatment centers to treat Internet gaming disorder and other mental health issues associated with excessive and problematic use, such as anxiety and depression.

In my opinion, the principles of a domain should not both create and address a problem. The American Psychological Association, the largest professional association for psychologists in America, has a code of ethics requiring psychologists to do no harm, to oppose work that does not benefit the well-being of people, and to do especially careful when dealing with young people because they are not yet fully mature.

As such, I believe psychologists have an obligation to protect children from the influences of persuasive technology. Researchers who help social media sites and games may think they’re just trying to help companies create the most dynamic and engaging products possible. But the reality is that they turn a blind eye to the many psychological harms that research has shown these products cause.

Parents and children are rightly concerned about the extent to which games, videos and social media are designed to exploit children’s impressionable minds. Psychologists could strive to explain to parents and children how children’s brains develop and how persuasive design harnesses this process. It can help families stop arguing about spending too much time with their devices and recognize that the biggest threat isn’t the devices themselves, but rather the companies that design these devices and apps for them. that they are so difficult to deactivate.

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Inaugural GRADFlix Contest Winners Announced – The Brock News http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/inaugural-gradflix-contest-winners-announced-the-brock-news/ Fri, 04 Mar 2022 17:27:03 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/inaugural-gradflix-contest-winners-announced-the-brock-news/ It was a clever and apt analogy that ultimately won Caitlyn Gallant (MA 2017) the Faculty of Graduate Studies’ inaugural GRADflix video research competition. In her presentation, Gallant, who recently completed her doctorate in psychology and will graduate from Brock this spring, used the concept of a car stuck in snow to explain how children […]]]>

It was a clever and apt analogy that ultimately won Caitlyn Gallant (MA 2017) the Faculty of Graduate Studies’ inaugural GRADflix video research competition.

In her presentation, Gallant, who recently completed her doctorate in psychology and will graduate from Brock this spring, used the concept of a car stuck in snow to explain how children with complex mental health needs often don’t react not to treatment, despite repeated support and treatment — as if their wheels were turning but they were getting nowhere.

His research examined biological, psychological, and social factors to determine what leads to high program utilization with poor outcomes. She was able to identify markers that can help clinicians identify these cases and, in turn, target mental health issues at an early stage.

Gallant’s impressive entry was one of more than 20 one-minute videos submitted to the competition between November 10 and January 31 by a variety of graduate students and recent graduates showcasing their research.

Close behind Gallant were submissions from Meghan Pellow (BPH ’19), who took second place, and Kim Uyeno, who not only took third place, but was also selected by the public as the winner of the choice of the public of the competition.

Pellow, a community health-focused master’s student in the Faculty of Applied Health Sciences, explored the effectiveness of nicotine replacement therapy for young adults who want to quit smoking. His study found that young adults who use cannabis occasionally were less likely to quit.

Uyeno, a master’s student in Applied Health Sciences, looked at the possible effects of a concussion on the brain and how it can affect sports performance. She used the softball bat to test the swing and reaction times and decision making of softball players who had previously suffered concussions.

Contest entrants were judged on their ability to communicate and conceptualize their research, creativity and visual impact, and technical quality.

The high quality of the entries and the graduate student search made it difficult to select the winners for the judging panel, which included three members of Brock’s senior management team:

  • Robyn Bourgeois, Acting Vice-Rector, Indigenous Engagement
  • Tim Kenyon, Vice President, Research
  • Ken Chan, Vice President, Administration

Kenyon said he learned something memorable from every video he watched.

“I was thrilled to see the creativity and clarity with which Brock graduate researchers explain their incredible research,” he said. “Submissions were accessible and intellectually generous, outlining important avenues of research.”

Winning the meet was the icing on the cake of Gallant’s experience at Brock.

“It was a very nice surprise,” she said. “There were so many creative and engaging video submissions, so entering the contest is an honor and very exciting.”

Gallant is currently a postdoctoral fellow in the Developmental Disabilities and Mental Health Laboratory at York University. She works with Jonathan Weiss and Children’s Mental Health Ontario to help build provider capacity and improve mental health services for children and youth with autism.

To learn more about GRADflix and view the competition video submissions, visit the Faculty of Graduate Studies website.

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Mental health care in prisons ‘ineffective’ due to shortage of psychologists, says auditor general | Canberra time http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/mental-health-care-in-prisons-ineffective-due-to-shortage-of-psychologists-says-auditor-general-canberra-time/ Wed, 02 Mar 2022 01:51:00 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/mental-health-care-in-prisons-ineffective-due-to-shortage-of-psychologists-says-auditor-general-canberra-time/ news, local news, alexander maconochie center, canberra prison, mental health, canberra prison, amc, psychologists, staff, indigenous ACT prison inmates with the most mental health issues are not receiving adequate treatment due to a severe shortage of psychologists at the Alexander Maconochie Centre, a damning report from the Auditor General has concluded. The provision of mental […]]]>

news, local news, alexander maconochie center, canberra prison, mental health, canberra prison, amc, psychologists, staff, indigenous

ACT prison inmates with the most mental health issues are not receiving adequate treatment due to a severe shortage of psychologists at the Alexander Maconochie Centre, a damning report from the Auditor General has concluded. The provision of mental health services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander prisoners is inefficient and there are opportunities for greater input from Aboriginal service providers at all stages of the prison mental health care system, revealed auditing. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander prisoners in the ACT are also not effectively screened for mental health issues when admitted to the territory’s prison, due to the lack of involvement of a health worker. Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander. The audit of mental health services at the Alexander Maconochie Center found that mental health services were effective for non-Indigenous inmates under psychiatric or suicide and self-harm ratings. However, care was insufficient for prisoners with less severe mental disorders. But support for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander inmates at risk of psychiatry, suicide or self-harm would be enhanced with input from an Aboriginal service provider. Auditor General Michael Harris released the report on the provision of mental health services in prisons on Wednesday, which says standards have been set under the Corrections Management Act. “Due to ambiguity of purpose, coupled with poor data collection practices and a lack of performance information collected by the agency, the Audit Office was unable to ‘determine whether that standard had been met,’ Mr Harris said in a statement. The audit revealed that there had been no strategic planning for the provision of mental health services at the prison and that planning was limited by poor data collection. “Planning for the release of inmates with mental health issues could also be improved by developing guidance documents outlining the process of such planning and the information needed to inform such planning,” the report states. The Auditor General made 19 recommendations, including that Canberra Health Services should develop a clinical services plan for the provision of mental health services in the prison, in conjunction with ACT Health. Canberra Health Services should also improve its record keeping and reporting lines, as the current arrangements ‘do not provide clear management links between Canberra Health Services and ACT Remedial Services’. Training for guards to better support inmates with mental health issues should be provided, according to the audit. Canberra Health Services should also prepare more information to cover release planning for inmates with mental health care plans. MORE ACT POLITICS NEWS: The 117-page report noted that there was a significant shortage of mental health staff in detention and that its psychologists were in junior positions. “Although funded for a total of 16 [full-time equivalent] staff, ranging from registered nurses to forensic psychologists, the team is just 11.2 [full-time equivalent staff]“, says the report. “The most significant staffing shortage occurs in the number of psychologists; only two of the four budgeted positions have been filled as of April 2021. The two psychology positions that have been filled are the most junior roles. The report also called for greater oversight of the services provided by Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health and Community Services, and a requirement for the service to be consulted in developing release plans for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander detainees. “While this happens informally, there is no established process to ensure advice and support is sought from Winnunga, or any other Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander health care professional, for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander inmates at risk of suicide and self-harm,” the report states. Our reporters work hard to bring local, up-to-date information to the community. That’s how you can continue to access our trusted content:

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More than masks affecting the mental health of young people: letters http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/more-than-masks-affecting-the-mental-health-of-young-people-letters/ Thu, 17 Feb 2022 10:10:05 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/more-than-masks-affecting-the-mental-health-of-young-people-letters/ February 16 — To the editor: At a recent local school board meeting, disturbing statistics about youth mental health were shared. Statistics have indicated an increase in depression, anxiety and suicide rates among young people over the past two years. It is true that children have experienced more depression and anxiety during the pandemic. It […]]]>

February 16 — To the editor:

At a recent local school board meeting, disturbing statistics about youth mental health were shared. Statistics have indicated an increase in depression, anxiety and suicide rates among young people over the past two years. It is true that children have experienced more depression and anxiety during the pandemic. It is also true that suicide rates and suicidal thoughts increased during this time. These trends have certainly been reflected in my practice of psychology, so I wasn’t shocked to hear the statistics.

I was, however, shocked to hear an attempt to reduce the current state of young people’s mental health to a single cause: mask-wearing. To claim that mask-wearing has caused a drastic increase in anxiety, depression, and suicide is misinformed and misleading at best. At worst, it is deliberately misleading and manipulative. The basics of scientific research tell us that two factors being related does not mean that one causes the other. Countless factors have contributed to young people’s mental health issues since Covid began. Separation from friends and family, coping with illness and loss of loved ones, not being able to visit hospitalized family, and anxiety about getting sick are just a few factors I hear speak in my practice that have had an impact on depression and anxiety rates. I have also heard many children say that wearing a mask has contributed to their difficulties over the past two years. That said, for some children who wanted to feel safer interacting and learning in person with their peers, wearing a mask helped alleviate anxiety and depression. It is clear that the complex experiences our children have endured during the pandemic cannot be reduced to simple causal relationships. They’ve been through a lot, and each child has gone through the past two years in a unique way.

As Covid numbers continue to improve in our area, it looks like mask mandates will soon be lifted. I look forward to a time when our children can interact safely without being masked. We will take a step closer to our pre-pandemic way of life. When that time comes, it will be important to recognize that our children have been through a difficult time in which countless variables have impacted their mental health. Wearing a mask, while certainly a factor, wasn’t the only cause of anything. Viewing mask-wearing as the root cause of their distress is misguided and risks downplaying other factors that have impacted our children over the past two years.

Christopher W. Griffith, Psy.D

Certified psychologist

Resident and relative of Newfields

Get to know the Rye Town and School Candidates February 24

February 15 – To the editor:

February 24 at 7 p.m. the Rye Civic League and the Rye Public Library are once again hosting a Candidates Night for all five races run in 2022. The Library still has a Covid capacity limit, so only Candidates will be in person, everyone else can see the streams of City Hall or the Zoom link (on your Rye Civic News and Rye Civic League website).

Questions should be submitted to the Rye Civic League (civicnews@ryecivicleague.org) by the 24th as they will be printed for city moderator Bob Eaton. Time permitting, additional questions can be submitted via Zoom chat.

The contested races are Joanne Meyer and Karen Oliver for the role of six-year supervisor of the role of the checklist. Victor Azzi and John Hart are competing for the only seat on the library’s board of trustees. Three people, Jennifer Madden, John Mitchell and Sandra Chororos, are competing for the one-year seat on the Zoning Board of Adjustment. For Select Board, Bill Epperson and Cathy Hodson are competing for the three-year post. The school board has two vacant seats and three competing candidates, Katherine Errecart, Danielle Maxwell and Susan Ross.

The Rye Election will be held March 8 from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. at Rye Elementary School.

Steven Borne

Rye

Vote for Epperson, Rye Board of Selectman!

February 12 – To the editor:

I worked on town councils and committees with Bill Epperson for a decade – on the beach committee, long range planning and the planning board. This is only a small part of his commitments to the city. He has also served on the Heritage Committee, the Capital Improvement Plan Committee and is currently Chairman of the Board.

Protecting and maintaining critical water sources, such as aquifers, wetlands and coastlines, is a priority. It creates and supports strict regulations to ensure that these resources will be there not only for our children, but also for our child-children. He focuses on this not for personal gain, but for the betterment of our community.

We reviewed and rewrote many aspects of the city master plan. In doing so, it emphasizes the integration of known facts, science, education, research and experience. It also ensures consistency with the opinions expressed by citizens across the city.

Bill was patient throughout the planning board process. Many applications require months of consideration. Throughout, he remains focused on legal compliance, obligations and fairness. I often find myself looking through the prescriptions, only to have Bill quote the layout of the memory code.

His institutional knowledge of the City is, at present, unmatched. He has lived in Rye for 44 years. Throughout this time, he has been involved, passionate and thoughtful. I often joked with him that his civic responsibilities require more time than a full-time job, it’s a way of life.

Vote for Bill Epperson for Rye Board of Selectman!

Katy Sherman

Rye

Pease cargo facility will negatively impact the lives of Seacoast residents

February 13 — To the editor:

I was impressed with Dr. Clinton Miller’s paper (February 8) on the negative effects of a freight facility at Pease.

It would no doubt be ‘noisy, dirty and negatively affect Portsmouth’s quality of life’.

Please reconsider this project.

Anne Donaldson

Portsmouth

Preferential Choice Voting Would Be Good for New Hampshire

February 13 – To the editor:

The NH House Election Law Committee is considering a bill to introduce Preferential Choice Voting (RCV) to New Hampshire. This is an enabling bill that would allow municipalities to opt in to the use of RCV for their elections and would allow parties to opt in to the use of RCV for primary elections, including the presidential primary.

The objective of the RCV is to elect a candidate who receives more than 50% of the votes. Voters can rank candidates in order of preference. For example, in a race with multiple candidates, you can select your first, second, and third choice, and so on. If a candidate wins more than 50% of the vote, that person wins. However, if no candidate wins more than 50% of the vote, the election proceeds to an instant ballot. The candidate with the fewest votes is eliminated. If this candidate was your first choice, then your second choice counts. If, again, no candidate wins more than 50%, the candidate with the fewest votes is eliminated, and if that was your next choice, then your third choice will count. This continues until one candidate wins over 50% of the vote.

RCV is an improvement over the “first-past-the-post” system we currently use, as it allows voters to vote according to their conscience, rather than voting for the perceived party favorite or the lesser of two evils. It gives voters more choices and more votes. This system is already in use in many countries and in many jurisdictions, US courts have consistently upheld CVR as constitutional. Courts have ruled that RCV gives every voter an equal vote. “Each voter has the same opportunity to rank the candidates when they vote, and in each round, each voter’s vote has the same value.”

The RCV is more representative of the will of the people than our current system. It eliminates voice splitting and the spoiler effect. This discourages negative campaigning and allows the political process to focus on what unites us rather than what divides us. Ultimately, RCV can help heal a divided society. To show your support for RCV, please sign the petition at www.nhrankedchoice.org For great artwork, visit www.fairvote.org

Jeanne Hambet

Portsmouth

State Representative NH Rockingham District 31 (Greenland, Newington, North Hampton, Portsmouth Ward 3)

Collective guilt? No. Collective responsibility? Yes.

February 15 – To the editor:

Germany, on the 50th anniversary of the Holocaust, struggled to come to terms with its violent and racist history with historical exhibitions, theater and art productions, books and talks. The unofficial slogan of the citizens’ groups organizing the educational effort was “Collective guilt? No! Collective responsibility? Yes!”

Today, teaching the subject of the Holocaust is compulsory in German schools. Additionally, almost all students have visited a concentration camp or a Holocaust museum. The effort to learn, take responsibility and move forward continues.

One hundred and fifty years after the Emancipation Proclamation, America continues to whitewash and make excuses for its racist history by limiting discussion of it in our public schools. NH is one of six states that has passed bills limiting how teachers can discuss racist and systemic inequalities, while directing them to promote the story of our exceptional goodness as a nation.

It is not a program that will serve our students well. Wounds from unexamined pasts tend to fester and prevent healing in the present. Although it is not always comfortable, in order to prepare our young people for a better future, we must be honest about our past and continue the tentative steps we take towards justice and reconciliation.

Teachers should be allowed to teach facts, rather than idealized versions of them that only serve the interests of a particular group.

Cynthia Muse

Rye

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Luke named first Horowitz professor of social policy – The Source http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/luke-named-first-horowitz-professor-of-social-policy-the-source/ Wed, 16 Feb 2022 06:01:00 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/luke-named-first-horowitz-professor-of-social-policy-the-source/ Douglas Lukea leading researcher in public health policy, systems science, and tobacco control at the Brown School of Washington University in St. Louis, has been named the first Irving Louis Horowitz Professor of Social Policy . An installation ceremony was held on October 12 at Hillman Hall. “Doug’s tireless work in systems science and tobacco […]]]>

Douglas Lukea leading researcher in public health policy, systems science, and tobacco control at the Brown School of Washington University in St. Louis, has been named the first Irving Louis Horowitz Professor of Social Policy .

An installation ceremony was held on October 12 at Hillman Hall.

“Doug’s tireless work in systems science and tobacco control is helping to improve lives around the world,” said Mary McKay, vice provost for interdisciplinary initiatives and former dean of the Brown School. “His efforts make evidence-based public health policy immediately effective for all of us.”

“Doug Luke is a renowned tobacco regulatory and health policy expert who tackles important public health issues in his work,” said Chancellor Andrew D. Martin. “It is fitting that he is the first holder of a chair named in honor of Irving Louis Horowitz, whose lifelong research focused on pressing problems of social policy.”

Luke directs work primarily focused on the evaluation, dissemination and implementation of evidence-based public health policy.

Over the past decade, he has used systems science methods, in particular social network analysis and agent-based modeling, to solve important public health problems.

He published the first review articles on network analysis in public health in 2007 and on systems science methods in public health in 2012. He has written books on multilevel modeling and analysis of network.

Luke

Luke runs the university Public Health Systems Science Center. Under his leadership, the center used network analysis to study the diffusion of scientific innovations, to model the formation of organizational collaborations, and to study the relationship between mentorship and future scientific collaboration.

In addition to his appointment at the Brown School, Luke is a member of the Public Health Institutedirector of evaluation for the Institute of Clinical and Translational Sciences and founding member of the Washington University Network of Dissemination and Implementation Researchers. He served on a panel for the Institute of Medicine that produced a national report on the use of agent-based modeling for tobacco regulatory science.

According to a 2019 PLOS Biology bibliometric analysis, Luke ranked in the top 1% of scientists in the world based on the number of most-cited papers.

Luke received a bachelor’s degree with honors in psychology and German for the arts and sciences from Washington University in St. Louis in 1983. At the University of Illinois, he received a master’s degree in 1988 and a doctorate in 1990 , both in psychology.

Horowitz’s Legacy

The Irving Louis Horowitz Professorship in Social Policy was established in 2020 by Mary Curtis Horowitz to honor her late husband’s contributions to the advancement of social policy and to support ongoing research and teaching in this area.

“Professor Luke exemplifies the kind of social science that Irving championed throughout his life: research based on evidence, not ideology, and research focused on pressing questions of social policy, rather than an ivory tower,” said Mary Curtis Horowitz. “Doug Luke tackles real-world problems and unravels what works and what doesn’t and uses innovative approaches to address important public policy concerns. It’s the kind of work that inspires confidence in what we social scientists can do, and it’s the kind of work that will guide us all to a better world.

Visit by Luke and Mary Curtis Horowitz before the installation ceremony. (Photo: Whitney Curtis/University of Washington)

Irving Louis Horowitz (1929-2012) was the Hannah Arendt Emeritus Professor of Sociology and Political Science at Rutgers University. Throughout his career, he taught at many institutions around the world, including the University of Washington from 1963 to 1969. He served as chair of the sociology departments at Hobart and William Smith colleges, University of Washington and Rutgers University. Horowitz also served as Chairman of the Board and Editorial Director of Transaction Publishers.

A prolific writer, Horowitz is the author of more than 50 books, many of which have appeared in translation and multiple editions, as well as hundreds of articles and essays. He has published books on a range of topics from political theory, education and academic affairs to public policy and publishing affairs. He was widely considered the authoritative voice on Cuban communism. Horowitz has received numerous awards for his contribution to public life.

In 2010, Penn State University announced that the “Irving Louis Horowitz Publishers Archive – Transaction, 1939-2009” was open for public search in the Historical Collections and Penn State Labor Archives of the Special Collections Library of the Eberly Family, University Libraries. The archives document the expansion of social science research over the past half century.

Mary Curtis Horowitz leads the Horowitz Foundation for Social Policy as president and is also one of its trustees. The foundation supports the advancement of social science research with a policy focus. Its specific mission is to award scholarships to aspiring doctoral students who support their thesis research. Since its creation in 1997, the foundation has granted grants to 250 researchers in more than 100 universities around the world.

She also sits on the board of a human rights organization, the Center for a Free Cuba, and is committed to literacy advocacy and other public service activities. In the past, she has served on the board of MIT Press, the board of the Society for Scholarly Publishing, and various publishing industry committees.

Under the name of Mary E. Curtis, her professional name, she worked for 45 years in academic publishing. Until 2017, she was President and Chair of the Board of Transaction Publishers. Previously, she was vice president at Wiley Publishers, where she led its journal publishing division, and was editorial director of an academic publishing unit at CBS Publishing.

A 1968 graduate of the University of Washington, she found ways to support the institution that put her on her path. She serves on the Brown School National Council and sponsors a series of lectures on social policy at the school. It also provided support to university libraries and endowed an arts and science scholarship.

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Just five more minutes, mom http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/just-five-more-minutes-mom/ Sun, 13 Feb 2022 20:04:00 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/just-five-more-minutes-mom/ Lisa L Lewis THE WASHINGTON POST – We already know this pandemic has been horrific for teens and their mental health. Last month’s mental health advisory from the Surgeon General of the United States (USA) underscored the scale of the problem, as feelings of hopelessness and even suicidality have increased in recent years in this […]]]>

Lisa L Lewis

THE WASHINGTON POST – We already know this pandemic has been horrific for teens and their mental health.

Last month’s mental health advisory from the Surgeon General of the United States (USA) underscored the scale of the problem, as feelings of hopelessness and even suicidality have increased in recent years in this group of age, with the pandemic only adding to teenagers. ‘ stress levels.

But there’s another element that plays an important role in teen mental health, especially now: sleep and the role it plays in improving mental health and emotional resilience. As children and teens readapt to the world in the wake of pandemic isolation, sleeping well can be a protective factor, said Lisa Meltzer, a pediatric psychologist at National Jewish Health in Denver.

“When you’re not sleeping well, emotional regulation is one of the first things to do,” she said.

“Insufficient, poor quality or poorly timed sleep – each of these factors can worsen mental health problems.”

According to many sources, including the National Sleep Foundation and the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, teens should get between eight and ten hours of sleep per night. But less than a quarter of high school students are meeting even the minimum, according to results from the most recent National Youth Risk Behavior Survey, conducted every two years by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

From a mental health perspective, aiming for more than the eight-hour minimum can be very helpful, experts say. In one study, teens who slept 8 3/4 to nine hours a night had the lowest levels of mental health problems, including mood swings, feelings of worthlessness, anxiety and depression.

In a recently published study examining college students’ sleep and mood, Tim Bono, associate professor of psychological and brain sciences at Washington University in St. week also had the highest increases in happiness and well-being throughout the semester.

This was true even for students who had lower baseline happiness levels at the start of the study.

Students with the most irregular sleep schedules were unhappy nearly twice as often, according to the study. Key sleep best practices, including consistency, appear to “significantly (affect) the trajectory of students’ psychological health,” Bono said.

When teens don’t get enough sleep during the week, they often sleep late on weekends to make up for the lack, perpetuating the cycle.

Getting enough sleep can provide an emotional buffer to help teens deal with everyday stressors, research shows.

Tiffany Yip, chair of the department of psychology at Fordham University, has studied how sleep affects adolescents’ ability to cope with discrimination-related stress.

A study she co-authored found that a good night’s sleep helped teens cope with discrimination and discrimination-related stress the next day.

Specifically, adolescents who had slept well the previous night were better able to select effective coping strategies, such as asking for help and not ruminating or obsessing over what had happened, he said. she declared. “When teenagers sleep well,” she said, “they are better able to cope with the stresses that await them tomorrow.”

And what about teenage sleep after a stressful day? It provides an emotional reset, helping them bounce back so there’s less fallout the next morning.

The researchers documented this “rebound” effect, finding that when teens slept more, they had a more positive overall mood the next morning, much like their mood after a low-stress day.

A “dose-dependent” association also exists between the amount of sleep adolescents have and their mood and self-harming behaviors. An analysis of youth risk behavior survey results found that high school students who reported sleeping less on school nights were proportionally more likely to report feeling sad or hopeless.

Compared to teens who slept for at least eight hours, those who slept for six hours or less were more than three times more likely to have considered suicide, made a plan, or attempted to , according to the analysis.

Meltzer characterizes the relationship between sleep and mental health as “intertwined”: sleep loss can negatively affect mood and emotional resilience, and mental health issues can affect sleep.

“We know that for different mental health diagnoses, anxiety and depression in particular, sleep can be both a symptom and a negative outcome of the disorder,” she said. “If we can improve sleep, some of the mental health symptoms will improve. But simply treating the sleep problem won’t necessarily cure depression or anxiety.

Instead, she recommended that both sides of the equation — sleep issues and mental health issues — be addressed simultaneously. (She also notes that teens sleeping too regularly — more than 10 hours a night — can be a sign of depression).

Meltzer emphasized the importance of sleep regularity for teens, as well as good sleep habits and best practices upon waking.

“Being exposed to bright light and getting out of bed in the morning is really essential,” she said. “For circadian rhythm regulation, it’s really important to have darkness in the evening and bright light in the morning.”

She also recommended teens not linger in bed, especially if they spend that time ruminating or using electronic devices.

“When we talk about sleep and mental health, those are the three takeaways: one, a consistent schedule; two, bright light in the morning; and three, only being in bed when sleeping,” Meltzer said.

Here are some other suggestions for promoting better sleep in teens:
– Moderate caffeine consumption: Caffeine is consumed by about 80% of teenagers and is a quick and effective stimulant, but caffeine in the afternoon or evening can make it more difficult to fall asleep that night. (As neuroscientist Matthew Walker notes in Why We Sleep, caffeine has a half-life of about five to seven hours, which means that even at bedtime half the caffeine will still be in your body. system).

– Be strategic when it comes to napping: Teenagers who nap too late in the day and/or too long can end up in a bad cycle.

– Exercise: Moderate to vigorous physical activity, such as walking, running, or playing basketball, can help set the stage for better sleep that night.

Again, timing is important: Late-night exercises can make teens feel more alert. (If evening practices and the like cannot be avoided, being intentional about winding down before bed can help counteract this).

Bono described sleep as an “investment”. As he told students, “Yes, it takes away the number of waking hours you have, but it ensures that during the hours you’re awake, you’re at your peak performance for happiness, for connect with other people and for well-being.”

Although it’s not a panacea, he says, “it’s a simple thing that can go a long way.”

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Dr. Julie Smith: “Mental health is no different from physical health. No one is safe’ | Psychology http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/dr-julie-smith-mental-health-is-no-different-from-physical-health-no-one-is-safe-psychology/ Sat, 12 Feb 2022 21:36:00 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/dr-julie-smith-mental-health-is-no-different-from-physical-health-no-one-is-safe-psychology/ Dr Julie Smith, 37, is a clinical psychologist who has a private practice in Hampshire and spent 10 years working for the NHS. In November 2019, she started make TikToks containing clear and engaging advice on various mental health issues. She has more than 3 million followers and in January published her first book, Why […]]]>

Dr Julie Smith, 37, is a clinical psychologist who has a private practice in Hampshire and spent 10 years working for the NHS. In November 2019, she started make TikToks containing clear and engaging advice on various mental health issues. She has more than 3 million followers and in January published her first book, Why hasn’t anyone told me this before?which spent four weeks at the top of bestseller lists.

There are many self-help books published; why do you think yours struck a chord?
I think people like that it’s evidence-based. I’m a clinical psychologist, so the things I put in there have been vetted with the latest research and they’re things that are taught to people in therapy, depending on why they’re going to therapy. These are also life skills that we can all use.

Everyone has had days when their mood is lower than they would like or days when they deal with more stress, grief or anxiety – all those normal human feelings that can hold us back or be difficult. to manage if we don’t have the right skills. Also, we just went through a pandemic and I think a lot of people are asking, “How can I get out of this?”

How did you transition to social media and TikTok?
When I offered psychological therapies, I found that many people were unaware that part of the therapy was educational. You talk a lot and work through your problems, but you also learn a bit about how your mind works, how you can influence your mood and emotional state, and how you can then affect your mental health on a day-to-day basis.

People found this educational aspect so empowering that there was a change in their ability to manage their mental health on a day-to-day basis. So I would come home and say to my husband that this stuff should be more available, that people shouldn’t have to come to me to find out the basics, and he said, “Well, come on. y, make it available. Put it on YouTube or something like that.

Giving people tools is cognitive behavioral therapy, right?
There is a mix in there. I tried to save it for everyday tools. I was very careful about this distinction: “It’s the educational element of therapy, it’s not therapy.” These are tools you can use today and tomorrow, but the book is not a therapist.

Social media is often blamed for young people’s mental health issues, especially self-esteem and anxiety
Part of my videos were to remind people that what they see on social media isn’t always real. Being aware when they spend time with certain content of how they feel and using social media to enhance their lives rather than deprive them of it.

Social media behavior such as ghosting, trolling or blockage can be painful. What advice do you give to people who find being online quite brutal?
It’s about recognizing that you have the power to choose. You have a choice of how much time you spend online, you have a choice of who you follow and who you don’t, and what content you engage with. When you embark on a mindless scroll, you may feel like you have no choice.

So my videos are really about reminding people and helping them realize – that if it’s affecting you in a negative way, you’re one step away from something different.

There’s a line that runs often that generation Z and millennials are more prone to mental health issues than they are basically snowflakes. How about that?
It’s not something I would engage with at all. Mental health is, for me, no different from physical health. No one is immune. If you take someone and start messing with their core defenses, like sleep, routine, social connections, nutrition, and exercise, that person will become vulnerable to physical and mental health issues.

I think more and more people are starting to realize this now and it helps to fight the stigma around mental health. It’s a much healthier way to look at it.

So people are just better at naming things these days, rather than actually being more fragile?
You are not more physically fragile to talk about your physical wounds. There are no more broken legs just from being cast now. It’s going in the right direction, but you’ll always have backlash, that’s how change happens.

“Metacognition” is the key concept of your book; why is it important?
It is a kind of reflection on your thoughts. This is one of the main tools we use in therapy – being able to step back from your thought processes and observe them. By doing this, you get to see them for what they are.

People often think of therapy as changing your thoughts. In fact, you can’t decide what thoughts will pop into your head – it just happens. The little you can choose is how much airtime you give to each thought.

You seem to have a weakness for positive thinking. Is positive thinking a bad thing?
Positive thoughts are good, they are not bad. But there is this kind of movement online around only positive vibes; don’t let the negative thoughts be there. If you have this standard for yourself, as soon as negative thoughts that you cannot control begin to appear, you begin to feel like you are failing or not being positive enough. That you are not enough in general. It makes you feel worse.

So therapy is often about accepting thoughts as they come, and then making choices about what to do with them. If I spend time with these thoughts, will it help me get where I want to go? Or if I spend time with these, what different impact does it have? This allows your brain to find whatever it comes up with and then choose what to do next.

There’s a chapter in your book called “How do you get yourself to do something when you don’t feel like it?”. We have all been there. What is the answer?
There are always things you don’t want to do. There is something that is taught in a therapy called Dialectical Behavior Therapy, DBT for short, which is the opposite action. Mindfulness is a really helpful part of that, where you become aware of the urges to take action. Thus, each feeling will give you a desire to do or not to do something. And often you’ll feel the feeling and you’re going to do the thing and you haven’t really separated the want and the action – you’re doing it all at once.

Julie Smith has 3 million followers on TikTok. Photography: @drjuliesmith/tiktok

But what you can do is start to become aware of a craving and start to recognize that you don’t have to act on it: you can act on the opposite of it. It becomes a tool you can use in those little moments that seem insignificant, but add up.

How do you think your content might change as we (hopefully) leave the pandemic behind us?
I don’t imagine for a minute that because the lockdowns ended the psychological fallout. People face huge losses. Not only where people have lost family members and friends, but also where they have lost their livelihoods, their jobs, their financial security, their homes, a sense of security when they go out. There are tremendous amounts of change that will continue for people.

The cost of the therapy puts it out of reach for most people and its availability is limited on the NHS. How do you reconcile that with the increase in the number of people showing up?
That’s part of why the book seemed like such a timely thing to do. I can’t give everyone individual therapy, but I can do something. I can share basic education as widely as possible.

I had no interest in being a public person or being on social media – it was really about sharing this information. And it was hard to do. I have three kids and a job and what kept me going was the feedback. It’s just overwhelming. Every day, people send a message saying, “Thank you very much. It makes a difference. It’s not an ideal world and I don’t have all the answers, but I can help.

  • Why hasn’t anyone told me this before? by Dr Julie Smith is published by Michael Joseph (£14.99). To support the Guardian and Observer order your copy at guardianbookshop.com. Delivery charges may apply

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Can mobile phone apps improve your mental health? http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/can-mobile-phone-apps-improve-your-mental-health/ Tue, 01 Feb 2022 01:49:51 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/can-mobile-phone-apps-improve-your-mental-health/ The mental health apps industry is booming, but scientists and clinicians are questioning whether these apps are safe and effective. A meta-review of mobile phone-based interventions for mental health shows limited evidence of their overall effectiveness, but the results are “strongly suggestive” of some benefits. Other research shows that when used appropriately, some mental health […]]]>

  • The mental health apps industry is booming, but scientists and clinicians are questioning whether these apps are safe and effective.
  • A meta-review of mobile phone-based interventions for mental health shows limited evidence of their overall effectiveness, but the results are “strongly suggestive” of some benefits.
  • Other research shows that when used appropriately, some mental health apps can enhance the therapeutic process.

Venture capitalists and online developers are taking advantage of the growing demand for therapeutic apps and other mobile phone interventions for mental health.

In fact, the mental health apps market is expected to exceed $3.3 billion by 2027, marking an annual growth rate of 20.5% from 2021. According to the American Psychological Association (APA)the growing interest of private equity firms investing in mental health apps has been largely fueled by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Recent reports suggest up to 20,000 Mental health apps exist today, with Headspace and Calm among the most widely used options.

But whether mental health apps and text-based interventions actually work remains to be seen.

A meta-review published in January 2022 looked at the effectiveness of mobile phone-based interventions for mental health symptoms, including:

The review included the results of 14 meta-analyses with 47,940 participants in 145 randomized controlled trials. The authors looked at a wide range of mobile phone-based interventions, such as:

Virtual therapy visits with mental health professionals were not part of the study.

Based on the data analyzed, the researchers found no convincing evidence that cellphone-based interventions effectively treated people’s symptoms.

However, the results showed “highly suggestive evidence” that cellphone-based interventions had the potential to improve anxiety, depression and stress. They also suggested that SMS interventions could help people quit smoking. The researchers recommended that more research be conducted to explore these avenues.

Simon B. GoldbergPhD, assistant professor in the Department of Counseling Psychology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and lead author of the study, said that while previous research suggests some benefits for smartphone-based interventions, the therapeutic alliance between client and advisor continues to be beneficial for overall efficiency.

“I suspect that humans simply react more strongly to interpersonal influences from living humans than to fully or partially automated technology,” Goldberg told Psych Central.

“Human connection is especially powerful, especially when dealing with mental health issues.”

As the technology for smartphone-based interventions continues to develop, Goldberg said the methods may yield better results. For example, machine learning-based algorithms could personalize content to tailor an individual’s therapeutic experience.

“It’s also possible that these interventions are only moderately effective on average,” Goldberg said, adding that some interventions, like CBT-based applications, may be more effective than others.

“It still allows for the possibility that some people will benefit a lot (while others will benefit very little), as well as the possibility that the technologies will be a useful first line of assistance or prevention.”

C.Vaile WrightPhD, senior director of healthcare innovation at APA, said one of the biggest challenges in the field of mental health apps is the lack of standardization and regulation, which includes research, rigorous testing and verification.

As such, some critics have called the mental health app industry “Wild West therapy.”

“As a consumer, it can be really difficult to figure out what’s good and what’s not, and then what’s effective and what’s not effective,” Wright said over the phone.

Many mental health apps aren’t grounded in psychological science, with some spreading false mental health information or leading to undesirable results.

According to Wright, possible risks associated with mental health apps can include anything from increasing symptomatology to disabling the therapeutic process.

“That would probably be our biggest concern — not that it doesn’t help at all, but that it actually hurts,” Wright said.

Goldberg’s study notes that mobile phone-based interventions could be considered a cost-effective way to reduce mental health symptoms and help people quit smoking.

He also notes that more research is needed to determine the effectiveness of these interventions for today’s digitally-focused youth.

According to Wright, mental health apps might be more helpful to “digital natives,” like young people and teens, compared to some adults. She said other groups who are less likely to seek traditional therapies, such as men, could also benefit.

“Similarly, for individuals in communities of color, this could be an intervention that connects some of that health equity gapadded Wright. “But I don’t think we know that right now.”

Other advantages

With mental illness affecting Tens of millions in the United States each year, mental health apps have the potential to reach wider populations than traditional psychotherapy.

Wright said that even before the pandemic, the field of mental health care was facing a labor shortage, leading to a large number of unmet needs for mental health interventions.

“We need to think more innovatively about how we are going to approach the public health of our country – and I think technology is a clear path for us to do that because it is more accessible; because it can be more affordable,” she said.

Like a recent APA article notes, mental health apps may also get more people into therapy.

Wright said mental health apps could also help break down stigma-related barriers because you can use them with a degree of anonymity, compared to a visit to a psychotherapist’s office.

It’s important to note that mental health apps are not designed to replace a conversation with a therapist or medical treatment. Some people use both together, and research from 2020 suggests that mental health apps can enhance the face-to-face therapeutic process with a professional.

Wright said as a consumer, it’s a good idea to do your homework before trying any mental health apps. Websites like One Mind Psyber Guide Rate and review different mental health apps to provide you with more information than just relying on star ratings in the app store.

You may also want to know how a mental health app will use your data and if it is sold or protected.

“The wellness app space is an unregulated area,” Wright said. “That means nobody tells them they have to protect your private health information from hackers, so it becomes really critical that consumers read the fine print.”

Despite the volume of existing research, therapeutic applications and other text-based technologies are still relatively new and constantly being improved.

While the overall effectiveness of these technologies for mental health issues remains questionable, there are also consistent evidence that they can provide a modest benefit.

“This could still have a major impact on public health, although a certain proportion of users need more intensive intervention to benefit,” Goldberg said.

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Getting an ADHD diagnosis just got easier online. Is this a good thing? http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/getting-an-adhd-diagnosis-just-got-easier-online-is-this-a-good-thing/ Sat, 29 Jan 2022 16:00:11 +0000 http://www.populerpsikoloji.com/getting-an-adhd-diagnosis-just-got-easier-online-is-this-a-good-thing/ Carol Yepes/Getty Images Has TikTok Convinced You That You Have ADHD? That you’ve probably had it since childhood and only recently understood the source of your inattention or forgetfulness? In a video on ADHD TikTok, a creator tells us what it’s like to get diagnosed later in life. “Imagine for a moment that you’re driving […]]]>

Carol Yepes/Getty Images

Has TikTok Convinced You That You Have ADHD? That you’ve probably had it since childhood and only recently understood the source of your inattention or forgetfulness?

In a video on ADHD TikTok, a creator tells us what it’s like to get diagnosed later in life.

“Imagine for a moment that you’re driving a shitty 1989 Chevette – shifter,” she explains. “Then one day you come across an article about Teslas, and you go and test drive a Tesla. And it runs like butter.”

Not only have other people had better “tools” to fix their cars when they break down, she explains, but they’ve been driving Teslas all the time. Unfortunately, getting that Tesla, aka an ADHD diagnosis and treatment, isn’t always easy. Lack of access to care, cost, or even having a doctor who won’t refer you for a test can get in the way.

In response to growing awareness of mental health and growing demand for telehealth and better access to care, ADHD diagnosis and treatment services are emerging online, promising users rapid diagnosis through a quick consultation with a professional (or even just an assessment). This allows them to skip the long process of finding a provider who can diagnose ADHD, which can put them on a waiting list for weeks or even months, and can also cost nothing less than an arm and a leg. But while online ADHD tests fill an important gap, they also come with notable risks, like misdiagnosis.

Difficulties in getting diagnosed

ADHD or Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder is one of the most common mental health disorders diagnosed most often in children, and in boys in particular. ADHD can present primarily as an inattentive or distracted type (someone struggles daily to focus or complete tasks, for example), a hyperactive or impulsive type (someone feels constantly restless and acts in a impulsive), or a combination of both.

Since ADHD is such a common diagnosis among school children and often comes with a prescription for a stimulant, some fear that ADHD is overdiagnosed in children. On the flip side, however, efforts to break down the stigma surrounding mental health have found their way to social media, where users on TikTok and other platforms share their stories and inspire others to get better. aid. This has prompted some adults to seek treatment for ADHD that might have been overlooked when they were younger because they did well enough in school, had enough support to function (or had found the tools to make that old Chevette work), or that they never acted “hyperactive”.

The fact that girls and women with ADHD are less likely to appear hyperactive is one theory as to why it is often missed in people designated as female at birth. According to Children and Adults with Attention-Defict/Hyperactivity Disorder (CHADD), an ADHD non-profit organization, women often only recognize ADHD in themselves. after the diagnosis of their own children with the highly hereditary condition.

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“I think it’s really, really wonderful that mental health is being de-stigmatized to a point where people can feel comfortable talking about it and sharing their experiences,” said Dr Adrian Jacques Ambrose, director from the Psychiatry Faculty Practice Organization at Columbia University. But getting an accurate diagnosis is essential.

ADHD is a very specific neurodevelopmental condition with not always specific symptoms, says Ambrose. ADHD affects the executive part of a person’s brain, including working memory, and can cause a lot of “noise.” But the symptom of “not being able to concentrate” is not always synonymous with ADHD, and concentration problems can be caused by depression, for example. If someone is diagnosed with ADHD after a quick consultation, stimulant therapy may not work as well for them.

It’s also important to analyze everyday distractions that we might all answer “yes” to in an ADHD survey from patterns that have negatively impacted your life, relationships and your self-esteem.

“Like everything else in medicine and certainly in mental health, the way we diagnose a disorder is to assess how much interference or hindrance it is causing in your life,” says Hafeez.

Getting Diagnosed with ADHD – Quickly

For a one-time diagnostic fee (prices vary, but most sites stay around the $150-$200 mark), a person who suspects they have ADHD can be diagnosed through a quick consultation with a provider in online through sites like Klarity and Done, and prescription drugs. if applicable or advice, depending on the site.

Then, users can pay a lower monthly fee to maintain their ADHD medication prescription by seeing a provider every month or so. Availability varies by state, as does insurance coverage: Done says the company doesn’t accept insurance for vendor appointments, while Klarity says it only networks with no supplier, but that she will help you get your money back.

Another online testing site, ADHD Online, does not require a video consultation with a provider. Instead, patients fill out a self-assessment that can be taken at your home, and it’s then reviewed by a PhD-level psychologist who will tell you whether or not you have ADHD. The assessment is available in all 50 states, but treatment options vary by state. ADHD Online says it will provide medication management “very soon”.

These services are much faster (and also potentially cheaper and easier to access) than going through the referral, diagnosis and testing process the traditional way, so they are good options for people with ADHD. . If left undiagnosed, ADHD can lead to a myriad of other problems, including substance abuse, feelings of depression and anxiety, as well as relationship and work issues.


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Cerebral is another website that offers quick diagnosis and treatment for ADHD, but also offers treatment for other mental health issues, including depression or anxiety. Clients screen for the disorder they think they have and are able to put a treatment plan in place that includes medication, therapy, or both. Although the monthly out-of-pocket costs may be higher (however, you may be able to use your insurance), this is a more comprehensive approach for someone who has never been diagnosed with a mental health issue before. . Prescriptions are available in all 50 states, but the therapy depends on your state.

But having a telehealth consultation or assessment to diagnose someone with ADHD is “atypical” for a standard of care, Ambrose says. In a clinical diagnosis, providers will meet with patients to review their family history, observe their nonverbal cues, and they are regulated for standard care practices — which may not be fully trained in a single brief telemedicine visit.

Hafeez says that while she’s “skeptical” about the accuracy of someone’s diagnosis online (whose concern we’ll address below), she also recognizes the increased demand for mental health treatment and considers sites rapid diagnosis as “preliminary” steps that can help set someone up for further evaluation.

An ADHD assessment, she says, is not enough. “We don’t take into account all of the comorbidities that may parade under the name ADHD.”

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When Symptoms Overlap and a Diagnosis Becomes Dangerous

People who are diagnosed with ADHD often have other mental health issues or comorbidities. The risk of an anxiety disorder in an adult with ADHD, for example, can be as high as 50%, according to a 2017 report published in BMC Psychiatry. Mood disorders such as depression or bipolar disorder are also more common in children and adults with ADHD.

Hafeez says she frequently sees patients who have been diagnosed and are being treated for ADHD, but who actually have another mental health condition. A missed diagnosis of bipolar disorder that is treated with ADHD medication is especially dangerous. (Brain says it can treat bipolar disorder.)

“The stimulants they use to treat ADHD can actually create a very intense mood response in people with a mood disorder,” Hafeez says, resulting in mania, depression, or even moodiness. suicidal thoughts. Generally speaking, people with bipolar disorder may be at 10 to 30 times higher risk of death by suicide than the general public.

For this reason, Hafeez exercises caution when treating patients seeking care for ADHD when she suspects they may also have bipolar disorder. While bipolar disorder is the most dangerous disorder to misdiagnose as ADHD, it is one of the most common, behind anxiety, depression, and learning disabilities.

As telemedicine continues to grow and more people become involved in their own mental health, we hope that the provision of accessible treatments and safe diagnoses can follow.

“I want to be aware that people are hurting, people are hurting, and it’s not reasonable or fair to say that the current wait time is three to six months, and you just have to wait three to six months to get this care,” says Ambroise. “I think it’s extremely unfortunate that as a health care system we are not able to meet this need.”

The information in this article is for educational and informational purposes only and is not intended to constitute medical or health advice. Always consult a physician or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have about a medical condition or health goals.

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